Pedego Trike Review

2017 Pedego Electric Trike Review
2017 Pedego Trike
2017 Pedego Trike Integrated Spanninga Trendo LED Headlight
2017 Pedego Trike Removable 36 Volt 11 Amp Hour Battery Pack
2017 Pedego Trike Lcd Control Panel Twist Throttle
2017 Pedego Trike Grip Twist Shifter Parking Brake Levers
2017 Pedego Trike 250 Watt Dapu Geared Hub Motor
2017 Pedego Trike Rear Disc Brake Finger Adjustable Avid Bb7
2017 Pedego Trike Mechanical Avid Bb7 Disc Brakes 160 Mm Rotors
2017 Pedego Trike Velo Oversized Comfort Seat With Back Rest
2017 Pedego Trike Plastic Storage Bin Bucket With Drain Holes
2017 Pedego Trike 30 Inch Width Fits Through Doors
2017 Pedego Trike 3 Speed Shimano Nexus Drivetrain Right Wheel Drive
2017 Pedego Trike Manual Charger Pedals Touch Up Paint
2017 Pedego Electric Trike Review
2017 Pedego Trike
2017 Pedego Trike Integrated Spanninga Trendo LED Headlight
2017 Pedego Trike Removable 36 Volt 11 Amp Hour Battery Pack
2017 Pedego Trike Lcd Control Panel Twist Throttle
2017 Pedego Trike Grip Twist Shifter Parking Brake Levers
2017 Pedego Trike 250 Watt Dapu Geared Hub Motor
2017 Pedego Trike Rear Disc Brake Finger Adjustable Avid Bb7
2017 Pedego Trike Mechanical Avid Bb7 Disc Brakes 160 Mm Rotors
2017 Pedego Trike Velo Oversized Comfort Seat With Back Rest
2017 Pedego Trike Plastic Storage Bin Bucket With Drain Holes
2017 Pedego Trike 30 Inch Width Fits Through Doors
2017 Pedego Trike 3 Speed Shimano Nexus Drivetrain Right Wheel Drive
2017 Pedego Trike Manual Charger Pedals Touch Up Paint

Summary

  • A custom designed electric trike with large plastic cargo bin at the back, three-speed internally geared hub can be shifted at standstill and is more durable than a traditional derailleur
  • Two mechanical disc brakes provide good stopping power, max speed limited to 7 mph in throttle mode, up to 11 mph in pedal assist with three power levels to choose from
  • Large LCD display panel is easy to read and navigate, there's a USB charging port at the base of the display and the trike comes with an integrated LED headlight and back light as well as reflective tires for safety
  • Heavier and more difficult to move than a traditional two-wheel ebike but much more stable, I hit my heels on the tub when pedaling at times, no reverse drive mode

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Pedego

Model:

Trike

Price:

$2,995

Body Position:

Upright Relaxed

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Urban

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

2 Year Comprehensive, Lifetime Frame

Availability:

United States, Canada, Mexico, Australia, New Zealand, Europe

Model Year:

2017

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

73.6 lbs (33.38 kg)

Battery Weight:

5.8 lbs (2.63 kg)

Motor Weight:

6.17 lbs (2.79 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminum Alloy

Frame Sizes:

13 in (33.02 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

13" Seat Tube Length, 29.5" Reach, 13" Stand Over Height, 73" Length, 30" Width

Frame Types:

Step-Thru, Trike (Cantilever Style)

Frame Colors:

Metallic Blue

Frame Fork Details:

Rigid Steel, 10 mm Axle with Nuts

Frame Rear Details:

10 mm Independent Axles with Nuts

Attachment Points:

Bottle Cage Bosses, Welded Rear Rack with Spring Latch

Gearing Details:

3 Speed 1x3 Shimano Nexus Internally Geared Hub, Chain Tensioner

Shifter Details:

microSHIFT inter Grip Twist on Left

Cranks:

Alloy 165 mm Crank Arms, 39 Tooth Chainring with Integrated Torque Sensor

Pedals:

Pedego Branded Wellgo Aluminum Alloy Platform

Headset:

Threadless External Cup Sealed Bearing, 1-1/8"

Stem:

Tool-Free Adjustable Angle, 0° to 80°

Handlebar:

High-Rise, 28" Width

Brake Details:

Avid BB7 Mechanical Disc with 160 mm Rotors, Tool-Free Adjustable Calipers, Tektro Levers with Motor Inhibitors and Parking Brakes

Grips:

Padded Stitched, Black

Saddle:

Velo Oversized Comfort with Back Rest and Rubber Bumpers

Seat Post:

Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

300 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

28.6 mm

Rims:

Double Wall Aluminum Alloy, Paint Matched, 36 Hole

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 13 Gauge with Brass Nipple, Silver

Tire Brand:

Schwalbe Big Ben, 20" x 2.15"

Wheel Sizes:

20 in (50.8cm)

Tire Details:

30 to 55 PSI, Performance Line RaceGuard Puncture Protection, LiteSkin Reflective Sidewall Stripe

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve, Pre-Slimed

Accessories:

Paint Matched Steel Chain Guard, Paint Alloy Matched Front Fender, Integrated Plastic Rear Fenders, Plastic Bucket with Drain Holes, Parking Brake Pins on Both Brake Levers, Integrated Spanninga Trendo or Luxo LED Headlight (15 Lux and 40 Lux), Integrated Spanninga Rear LED Light, (Press the Power Button Once When On to Activate Lights), Flick Bell on Right, Optional Rain Fly to Cover Bucket

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack, Quick-Connect Modular Throttle and Motor Cables for Easy Repair or Replacement, 1.8 lb 2.5 Amp Charger

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Dapu

Motor Type:

Front-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

250 watts

Motor Peak Output:

650 watts

Motor Torque:

30 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Panasonic, 18650

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

11 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

396 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

4 hours

Estimated Min Range:

25 miles (40 km)

Estimated Max Range:

30 miles (48 km)

Display Type:

Fixed, Monochrome, Backlit LCD

Readouts:

Speed, Assist Level (1-3), Battery Level (5 Bars), Time, Odometer, Trip Meter

Display Accessories:

5 Volt Standard Sized USB Port (Hold Set and + to Activate)

Drive Mode:

Twist Throttle, Torque Sensing Pedal Assist

Top Speed:

11 mph (18 kph) (7 mph Throttle Only)

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Written Review

Pedego introduced their first electric trike in late 2013 and I got to test and review it at a shop called Rocket Electrics in Austin Texas. This was one of the first ebike tricycles I had ever seen and the custom design was inspiring and exciting. Rather than use a sharp rattly steel basket, Pedego had developed a paint-matched plastic bucket of sorts and its polished curved lines looked radically different. More like a side-car on a motorcycle or the rumble seat of an old fashioned car… Three-wheeled bicycles tend to easier to mount and more stable to ride than those with just two wheels. They are well suited to cargo hauling, like groceries or books, but without electric assist their heavier weight and comfort-oriented geometry can make them difficult to pedal. Notice how the cranks on Pedego’s trike are positioned forward and the saddle has a back rest built in. The handle bars are raised up and swept back and there’s a tool-free adjustable stem. It’s a “one size fits all” platform that’s sold exclusively through dealers where you can get fitted and go for a test ride. Of course, the price is a bit higher at nearly $3k but you get a solid warranty and end up with some upgraded components and accessories. For me, the internally geared three-speed hub (that can be shifted at standstill), reflective tires, integrated batteries and disc brakes are stand outs. This is a trike with pedal assist and throttle mode but no reverse (likely to keep the control interface simpler and more intuitive).

Driving the trike is a modest 250 watt internally geared hub motor spoked into the front wheel. The peak output is around 650 watts and it’s made by Dapu which is a higher-end brand with zippier performance. One thing I noticed with their new hub design is that the motor power cable comes down through the axle vs. out the end. This keeps it tucked away, reducing snags and bends that can eventually ruin the motor. Rather than 20 mph or even 15 mph the Pedego Trike is speed limited to 11 mph in pedal assist and 7 mph in throttle mode. Trikes are more stable when mounting and loading but they can get up onto two wheels at higher speed when taking sharp turns. The lower top speed here might be a nod to safety and it probably also improves range. You can hear it operating at full power but overall, I’d say the motor is quiet… complimenting the now quieter plastic tub, front fender and chain cover. For a trike with all of these extras added on, I was also impressed with the 73.6 lb curb weight.

Powering the motor, backlit display and LED lights is a very average sized battery. But again, the lower top speed helps to extend range and LED lights don’t take much juice… The pack offers 396 watt hours (36 volts, 11 amp hours) of capacity and uses high quality Panasonic cells that should last. Unlike the older trike, this battery is easy to reach and remove if you’d like. It’s right there in the frame tubing which helps to bring weight forward on the trike (improving front wheel traction) and locks on securely with a key. Some electric trikes make you leave the key in while riding, like the ignition on a car, but not this one. It would be in the way and vulnerable to being kicked if so. Basically, they did the battery right. You can charge it on-frame using a port on the left side of the frame or take it off and charge it inside. The pack has a folding handle to give you a solid grip (dropping batteries is not good) and there’s even a little LED charge level indicator built in so you know how full it is even if it’s not mounted to the bike.

Operating the new Pedego Trike is very easy… Once the battery is charged and locked in place, just press and hold the power button on the brilliant LCD display for a few seconds. It flickers to life showing battery capacity, speed, assist level and trip stats and it starts in zero. This is a good thing because the twist throttle could get bumped if the trike started in level 1-3 and take off on you. I recommend sitting down on the trike before powering it on, then arrow up one, two or three clicks and begin pedaling. Note that this electric trike uses a fancy torque sensor vs. a cadence sensor. I’m not sure I love the choice because it required more leg power than expected during my test rides. I was consistently in the highest level of assist but still opted to use the twist throttle most of the time to get going. The combination of a “shift anytime” internally geared hub, three levels of assist and the throttle option make the experience great and I suppose that cadence sensors (which tend to have an on/off jerky feeling) wouldn’t be as smooth. And so, maybe down the line the controller will be adjusted so you don’t have to pedal as hard to get the motor to respond and note, this was a pre-production build of the trike which had been used for demos. I recommend visiting a dealer to try for yourself :)

There’s a lot to love about the new Pedego Trike. Part of me misses the glossy red of the original but I appreciate the thought that went into their new black cargo bin which won’t smudge or scratch as easily. The metallic blue would look good with a male or female rider and all of the comfortable, adjustable touch points are there to make it enjoyable to ride. I especially like the large metal pedals which grip your foot but do not have sharp pins on them! They are partially rounded so as not to scrape legs and shins if you lose traction. Paul Auclair, an engineer product manager at Pedego, even mentioned the possibility of a rain fly cover for the cargo bin at some point in the future. There’s a lot of thought that went into the cables, frame design and gearing of this trike. Very few options even exist in this space and many upright neighborhood designs like this do not have disc brakes for example. Overall, I was very impressed and had a great time. I didn’t feel like the limited top speed was a deal killer and I loved how maneuverable the trike was. This would be an excellent platform for someone with limited balance who still enjoys cycling and might also want some utility for shopping. My Grandfather, for example, has a limited license which does not allow for driving after dark but with the Pedego Trike he could visit friends or dash to the store easily and stretch his legs in the process.

Pros:

  • A purpose built (from the ground up) electric trike with color matched wheels, chain guard and front fender
  • Comfortable and stable yet narrow enough to fit through most doors (it measures 30″ wide), the oversized seat with back rest and high-rise swept back bars offer an upright body position
  • Feet-forward design allows for lower seating position and easier mounting, the deep step-thru frame is very easy to step onto and sit down on
  • Both brake levers have locking pins so you can steady the bike when loading/unloading and have it stay put when not in use (trikes don’t usually have kickstands so this feature is important)
  • Unique plastic cargo bin in the rear looks sleek, is textured with “orange peel” tread to hide blemishes and has drains in the bottom for easy cleaning, I like that it doubles as a fender for both rear wheels
  • The battery pack on this e-trike is relatively easy to access and doesn’t require that your keys be left in to operate, you don’t have to bend way down or reach under the cargo bin to get at it… if you do take it off, there’s a plastic handle on top making it easier to move around
  • Top speed is limited to ~7 mph in throttle mode and ~11 mph in pedal assist for safety, these speeds are more stable on a trike and should extend your range as well
  • I like the adjustable stem, it doesn’t require tools and is designed to bring the handle bar up or down to provide a more comfortable fit for riders of different sizes (the trike only comes in one size)
  • This electric tricycle has disc brakes! I was really impressed to see two discs and found that they stopped fairly well and were easier to use than some band brakes and linear pull brakes
  • Integrated LED lights (that run off the main battery) keep you safe, aren’t going to get lost and aren’t as easy to leave on accidentally as after-market lights, I like the positioning of them and appreciate that the headlight is aimable… note the reflective sidewall tape on the tires for an even larger visual footprint for cars to see
  • In addition to the LED lights, there’s a standard sized USB port at the base of the display so you can run an extra light, charge your phone or bring some speakers or string lights for fun :P
  • I absolutely love that you can shift gears at standstill thanks to the internally geared three-speed hub, this makes starting from rest easier (especially on an incline) if you forgot to shift down earlier when moving
  • Dapu hub motors are well designed and tend to be zippier than the competition in my experience, the power cable does not come out the end of the axle (where it could get snagged or bent if the trike tipped), it comes down and tucks near the fork arm
  • The original Pedego Trike had a rear-mounted battery which added to the weight of the two wheels and bucket… for the new one, having the battery up front makes the frame more balanced and allows for more space in the bucket

Cons:

  • As with many front-wheel-drive trikes, the hub motor is zippy and powerful enough to spin out a little if you blast the power on, I usually ease in using the twist throttle gently so as not to wear the tires or damage some types of terrain
  • There’s no reverse mode on the trike, some competing products let you go backward which can be useful for parking and moving (especially when the cargo bin is fully loaded)
  • To me, the torque sensor felt weak and required more leg effort than expected. Considering there are three levels of pedal assist, I would have expected the highest level to be more powerful… I ended up using the throttle most of the time as a result
  • Several times when trying to pedal, I snagged my heels on the plastic bucket shell, I wear 9.5 shoes (so my feet aren’t especially large) and feel that the shell of the bin should not protrude so far… it’s just the plastic cover, not the inner box that snagged me so I feel like they made it long for style vs. function and maybe you could cut adjust it yourself if you snag your feet too
  • Pedego products are sold through dealers and come with a great warranty but that makes them a bit more expensive, for $2,995 you get a pretty custom setup here so it’s not too bad
  • The trike is much heavier than a two-wheel electric bike and could be difficult to transport after purchase, consider a small trailer for your car from Harbor Freight and remove the battery and seat to reduce weight
  • Pedego introduced another trike several years ago that used more wires, had a louder cargo bin at the rear and just wasn’t polished… this oone still has some noise from the plastic bin but is much quieter, I prefer plastic to metal which can cut and sometimes get rusty if it’s a steel basket
  • All of your pedal power and rear braking goes to one wheel, not both, so the right tire might wear out faster and if you slam on the brakes the stop might pull you to the right a little
  • This is more of a warning than a con, be careful with the chain cover because it’s easy to kick and bend when mounting and riding the trike

Resources:

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Shaggy
11 months ago

This would be perfect for my senior citizen mom who one day will stop driving. Senior citizens who are not driving can have a way to get around, not be shut-in, and be happily independent – this is very important to self-esteem. Groceries could fit in the back. Interestingly, I believe trikes are more stable and steer better if the two wheels are in the front. In that arrangement, the rear single wheel could use a large hub motor to drive several hundred pounds or so. At my work, I could see these used by Facilities workers which would avoid gasoline and require less parking space. I really think 3-wheeled designs offer a lot of promise in multiple contexts. More power seems needed, especially to push a rider with cargo, add copious throttle because it could be too much weight to pedal for most except the physically most fit. Something trike-like between this Pedego design and the recumbent-style SunSeeker would be exciting evolution.

Reply
Court Rye
11 months ago

Good thoughts Shaggy, thanks for sharing! I agree that it’s nice to have a few choices emerging and that electric trikes can bring back independence and fun for people who might be stepping away from more conventional options. My Grandfather lives in a retirement community and many of his friends drive golf carts around :)

Reply
Lee
7 months ago

Shaggy,,,Your review is good. I am living in a cottage behind my kids house. I do have a car, but rarely use it. My kids bike or ELECTRIC skateboard daily. I want to go with them on their rides. The only thing that bothered me was the limit on speed. I am seriously looking to buy this trycycle in next week or so. MUST give some thought to the speed. Thanks for your review. Any Seniors on here to put in their two cents. Would love to hear from you.

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ronnie421
21 hours ago

My name is Ronnie. I am a first time e-bike POTENTIAL buyer. I am recently disabled, spinal stenosis, weak legs, weak knees, nerve damage in both legs. I was forced to convert from a traditional touring bike (had a Cannondale Touring 2 bike and was injured on a training ride in preparation for a cross country bike tour). BUT I'm stubborn and found a way (I think) to make my dream come true. I have recently discovered the Pedego Stretch. Lots of space for my gear and a heavy load cap since I have gained lots of weight since my injury. It will also allow me to carry extra batteries to accomplish 80 to 100 miles per day and my 55 pound Triaxe foldable mobility scooter (of course the mobility scooter is for off-the-bike days). First of all... any ideas or input about a cross country e-bike tour? Second... Anyone want to join me for a summer 2019 departure? Thanks for your input! Ronnie, Corpus Christi, Tx.

Over50
1 day ago

Howdy. I was born in Lubbock but living in Michigan these days. How about total budget in addition to intended use?

One option you might consider if you want to have the support of a local shop: most towns have a Trek dealership and I believe Trek owns Electra. The Electra Townie line has some nice options. If you have confidence in your local Trek shop and they have a good reputation for service after the sale, it might be worth it to consider a slightly higher priced bike. I'm in a larger metro area and my local Trek shop stocks quite a few of these Townies.

Maybe worth a pre-arranged trip to Austin as well to try out some bikes? Pre-arranged in that maybe an Austin dealer could have quite a few bikes lined up for you all to test out on a given day. Ann who is the moderator of this forum could probably help you there. I used to live in Amarillo and I doubt they would have much in the way of e-bike sellers. Midland or Hobbs? Probably not.

But yes it will help us to know total budget and intended use in order to make some better recommendations. Here's a link to the Townie line:

http://www.electrabike.com/bikes/townie-go/townie-go-8i?g=stepthru

bob armani
1 day ago

[INDENT]Hello-Sounds like you are new to ebikes. Things you might want to consider before purchase:[/INDENT]

[*]First, we would need to know what you will be using the bike for (ie: commuting to work, trail riding, leisure, etc).
[*]It is usually recommended that you find a dealer nearby that offers demo bikes to try so you can get a feel for the bike and see if the power of the bike is something you are comfortable with.
[*]There are many component options available and price points to consider.
[*]If you buy online without a test ride, you may be blind to some unforeseen issues you may have overlooked when choosing your bike.
[*]Can I suggest that you view some of the videos on this forum for the Rad Power and Juiced to become familiar with components and options available.
[*]Perhaps there are others that can chime in with their thoughts that I may have missed. Good Luck and please keep us all posted!

Rich Baum
1 day ago

As I am a big fan of users / Owners groups on Facebook I have made one for my new E-Glide S/T

In the past Owners groups like Rad ams Pedego have really helped me not only learn about the specific brand but also E Bikes in general.
So I invite anyone interested in learning more about E-Glides but E Bikes in general.
This new group will also be a place to review ans suggest accessories and additions to your bike.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/EGlide/

Vicki
1 day ago

Hi .I am from Lubbock - TX and thinking to buy an e-bike for my self and for my mom. My inital plan was to go with a Pedego but the price tag is little high for me to buy 2. I see lot of good comments about Rad Power and Juiced. Can you share me how the after sales and warranty works with them ? As buying online seems only option.

Scooteretti
3 days ago

Here is a video by one of our customers who built himself a trailer with panels. His video will show you what his real life experience was with a solar panel trailer that he built himself for his Pedego City Commuter.

Bruce Arnold
4 days ago

Well, 108 miles. ;)

I had some trouble with a chain link that was too tight. Took it in to the LBS and got that fixed. They fine-tuned the rear derailleur too. It now shifts so well. Being able to effortlessly get it into the right gear is a real joy. Before, it would hesitate, sometimes shift 2 gears instead of one, stuff like that. This is not a Juiced Bikes problem, I've seen it on other bikes also. Regardless, the shop only charged me $16; well worth it.

I'm still fine with riding in the 18-20 mph range. My rationale is this: being a heavy guy (me plus gear = ~300 lbs), I'm already putting a certain amount of stress on the bike, primarily the wheels. The frame itself is built plenty strong. You smaller guys, hitting the same bumps and holes in the pavement at maximum speed are putting the same stress on the system. As Trek says in their manual, "The most significant variable in durability is the manner in which you ride ... If you ride hard or aggressively, you should replace the bicycle and/or its parts more often than riders who ride smoothly or cautiously."

That being said, I haven't had any problems with the spokes. That was an issue for many riders when the CCS first came out. It seems that the move to the 13 gauge Sapim spokes has fixed that. So much of the spoke breakage was within the first 100 miles. I've had none at all. I was sort of leery about this at first, but other than occasional inspection of the wheels for proper spoke tension (which we should all be doing anyway), I'm just not worried about it.

As I get in better condition, I find that I use level 1 less and less for recreational riding. Eco does the job for me at all speeds up to 20 mph, and I rarely even use 9th gear (although it's fun to sail down hills for bursts of up to 25 mph in 9th.) For commuting, Level 2 and 3 are great so I arrive without being sweaty and out of breath.

Using combinations of the pedal assist levels and the gears is becoming more and more automatic. At first I had to think about it. Now it's getting natural. Totally awesome to move from Eco to 1 to climb a hill in the same gear, for instance, without having to give it any thought.

As I've said elsewhere in the forum, I'm not worried about the "charging to 80%" thing. I charge when it drops to around 44 volts, and take it off the charger at around 53 volts. This gets me over 50 miles, without losing any significant performance. This may not absolutely maximize the battery life, but will provide many years and thousands of miles of riding enjoyment. I'm sure I'll want one of those 52 volt batteries Tora just started selling, long before this battery bites the dust.

My wife's Pedego doesn't have the cruise control or the boost function. I'm really glad the CCS has 'em. I use them both all the time. I don't find myself using the throttle a whole lot, except for the boost. With the cruise control, I just don't need it.

Another degree of rake would suit my riding style better. I mentioned this soon after getting the bike. It's just fine the way it is, but a little more stability over nimbleness would be welcome.

I'm very happy with the Marathon Plus tires. I've read that some people feel they are too heavy or stiff or something. To me they give a comfortable ride, with the added security as well. As tech reviewer Flossy Carter says, "One a scale of one to ten, this is a major win."

I really appreciate the advanced read-out on the LCD panel. I wish the font were bigger -- which would require a bigger display unit overall -- but that may be just a function of 65-year-old eyes. The information provided is so helpful. Again, my wife's Pedego doesn't provide this level of information, which I find both interesting and helpful. The only thing I'd add would be a trip odometer. My workaround for that is that I've added the https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=de.rooehler.bikecomputer.pro&hl=en app to my Android. It has a lot of great features. I added a https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B074XST5G2/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 to the top tube to carry the smartphone. It has some basic bike tools in the side pockets also. The red and black version looks great on the red CCS.

I've ordered a https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000BR4NIC/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 and https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B007FRCIDI/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 to make my commuting safer and more efficient.

The CCS is, for me, a perfect platform for commuting and recreation. Thank you, Tora and the rest of the team at Juiced Bikes!

Bruce Arnold
4 days ago

Chris, I've ordered a MirrCycle mountain bike mirror. If it doesn't fit my CCS, it will fit my wife's Pedego. I'll post here when I know something. Supposed to arrive next Tuesday.

Dewey
4 days ago

It's about to get easier to buy a https://pedegoelectricbikes.com/pre-loved/ ex-rental with a 1 year warranty on the battery!

mbrown
4 days ago

I think issue isn't about they are made in china but rather lack of quality control. There are several brands made in china which i will trust such as BH, Pedego, Giant but they have a strict qc. What you experienced is really annoying. If you paid with paypal you can ask your problem to be solved by seller.

mbrown
4 days ago

I will definitely go with Dapu motor. I tried several Dapu motors such as Pedego, BH and Bafang versions. I will focus not on torque rather than watt power (as it is not telling much about power alone. It is showing the efficiency of the motor ). You can also check Ariel Rider which also uses Dapu motors and they have a discount as i see on their facebook page. You can get one around $1700 (with hydraulic brakes I guess but not sure. You better contact them and ask details. As with a high power motor hydraulic brakes really make a big difference. For e-glide I see they have suspension fork which is a very good point but i didn't see much about components such as if they have torque sensor, what kind of display, etc... And if you are not going to wear only shorts, not having a chain cover on a bike can be really annoying. Anyway my two cents of advice is go with Dapu motor especially if you are looking for a geared hub motor.

Rich Baum
5 days ago

I am about to pull the trigger on a new S/T and while I was doing my research I found there was no Facebook Group for E-Glide so I took the liberty of starting a user group.
Personally I found both the Pedego and Rad Owners groups to be extreemly helpful in my research process so I am confident this will be a great resource for people to share ideas, suggestions, fixes, photos and story's around this great bike and company.
I look forward to seeing your requests to join this new Facebook group.. and I am very excited to join all the other E-Glide owners..

https://www.facebook.com/groups/EGlide/

miro
6 days ago

Anxiously waiting for the release of the Pre-order. Thanks

johnstol
1 week ago

I promised a report in December but I have been abroad without my Shimano STEPS recumbent trike for several weeks.

The shop who fitted the STEPs to my trike did some tests and adjusted the orientation of the crank sensor. After four weeks of riding, totalling 350 km, I've had no recurrence of the problem.

One strange effect I have noticed is that when using the high assistance setting, and travelling at 25-26 km/hr, the power seems to ebb and flow slightly, like a tandem stoker who gives a sudden push on the pedals and then relaxes.

I hope others who have this E20 E10 problem eventually get satisfaction from Shimano. It mirrors other multinational giants like Apple, whose customers have to rely on user forums to get their expensive equipment sorted out.

Mike's E-Bikes
2 weeks ago

Your fork on your breezer could very well be steel, while your frame is aluminum. Try using a magnet on it. if it sticks, its steel or chromoly. For the GEO, due to its design you won't need torque arms anyway, so even if your is aluminum, the GEO will be fine. Regarding the tires, they are solid core, but these guys knew all the issues surrounding foam tires. Seems like they've worked them out. They need some break in time, but for your needs, this GEO is still pretty much your only option. Any decent kit is going to be more expensive, and it will take someone who knows what they are doing to install one. With step through you'd have to likely go with rear battery mount. And to have something removable like you want, your standard conversion kit, front or wheel, will not be easy or conducive to removing for the purpose you describe. Hence why I suggest the GEO. I've done all sorts of conversions, front hubs, mid drives, rear hubs, and on nearly every conceivable bike style. Step throughs, fat tires, recumbents, trikes, fixies, 24 speeds, aluminum, carbon frames, folding bikes, and tandems.

MikeDD
4 weeks ago

We use the Mirrycle MTB Mirror on my Mini and the wife's Liberty Trike. It is also easy to remove if you fold the bike or haul in inside a small cargo trailer like we do.

https://www.amazon.com/Mirrycle-MTB-Mountain-Bicycle-Mirror/dp/B0009R96YK/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1516914268&sr=8-1&keywords=mirricycle

Nirmala
4 weeks ago

Another update from ShareRoller today with another delay, but also lots of new details about and images of the device:

Hello ShareRoller Indiegogo backer:

First off, our apologies for the long delay in getting out this Update - we have been absolutely scrambling over the past two months trying to get every component shipped to us before our China suppliers shut down for the Chinese New Year (CNY) holiday, which falls on Feb 16th this year. The Chinese New Year is a 3-week+ shutdown for ALL factories that we were trying our hardest to avoid...

Unfortunately, we didn't make it and now several suppliers will not be able to deliver components until after the break, namely our Battery Pack and Wireless Controller suppliers. This means it will be the end of February at the earliest before we can expect to receive these components, and more than likely will slip into March, given the slow start-up that is common after this holiday. This is an enormously frustrating scheduling impact for us, and we understand it is equally painful for our Backers as well. Please accept our apologies for this further delay and know that we are doing everything we can.

Several main issues pushed us past the CNY holiday shutdown:

Wireless Controller Waterproofing: During wet weather testing, we discovered that our wireless controller housing was not adequately protected from water ingress. Given the multitude of controls and ports on our remote (Single-axis joystick, two buttons, two switches, and a Micro-USB port), a standard rubber seal was not effective enough. So we had to go back to the drawing board and design a custom latex bladder to enclose all the electronics, and move to an IP67-rated Micro-USB port since that needs to be exposed.

Wireless Controller FCC Certification: We had understood that FCC certification was already completed by our wireless controller supplier, since the base wireless architecture is already in commercial use. Unfortunately, we've learned that Chinese suppliers often complete only CE certification for wireless, since the FCC process is so expensive and time-consuming. So we've had to pay for complete FCC certification on our own, and it's not just expensive but also time-consuming. Hence the delay.

Battery Pack Mold Tooling : We've been unbelievably frustrated at how long it has taken to start the tooling for the battery pack molds. Believe it or not, we paid our deposit for these molds back in April 2017 (!), and we've expected the mold to start month after month after month since then. So we haven't been misleading you when we've said the tooling was about to begin, again and again. To our great frustration, there has been one change request after another from the molding engineers in China, and many of them have not been acceptable, so we've had to go through prolonged back and forth design iterations to find a workable solution. I can count nearly 500 emails this year alone between us and our battery supplier! BUT, at long last the design has passed final approval on both sides and the molds will start tooling this week. Our supplier is doing their best to expedite the lengthy tooling process (normally 6 weeks), so we're hoping to have it done by the end of February, and then Battery Pack assembly can begin (a much quicker process).

Given all of the delays with the Battery Packs, we've unfortunately had to postpone production of the Ultra size packs. However, with the advances in Lithium battery cell tech over the past two years, and the fact that we're using the highest-quality cells on the market (and most expensive!), our Standard packs now have 300 Watt-hours of capacity, nearly 40% more than we originally promised for the Standard pack, and 75% of the range of the original Ultra spec. Regardless, we will still offer partial refunds for all of our Ultra pack Backers, which of course could be applied to extra packs if you wish! And some good news for all the 'Mini' Backers out there too - the final capacity spec is 130 Watt-Hours for the Mini packs, almost 20% more range than originally promised!

Now that all the disappointing news is out of the way, at long last we can show you ALL the glorious details of the final design. We're very sorry to have kept you in the dark for so long on exactly what you would be getting (!), so we're thrilled to finally share all of the pics and details below. We are in the process of updating our website for Pre-Orders, but the photo and video shoots are taking much longer than expected. So in the meantime here is a sneak-preview of the all-new SR4 -apologies for the renders only, but we should have photos soon and will share them with you as soon as do.

First off, here's how the SR4 looks when assembled and carried: the Mini is shown below - it really is tiny:

And here is an annotated pictogram of the assembled SR4 package: Battery Pack + Motor Module + Wireless Remote (again, the Mini version is shown below)

And here is a close-up annotated pictogram of the SR4 Motor Module alone- the feature-packed heart and soul of ShareRoller:

And here are the key measurements of the Mini vs Standard combinations.

And since it's hard to see every detail with two pics, here's a rotating pictorial of the Motor Module so you can see it from every angle:

Now for some detail on SR4's groundbreaking new Automated Traction Control System (ATCS) with Motorized Normal Force Control. This Patent-Pending technology transforms the century-old technology of Friction Drive, making it finally competitive with more common E-Bike powertrains. We've described this to you previously, but here is a LOT more detail - hopefully this will make you appreciate the significance of this advance (and all the work it has entailed!):

Here's a small video animation to sum up how it all works:

And now on to our completely custom wireless controller. We looked at all the available E-Bike and E-Skate throttle systems on the market, and none of them came close to what we wanted for a truly removable and portable system. And none had the feature-packed functionality we desired. So we designed our own implementation (using existing wireless tech), creating a completely unique form factor that gives vastly more versatility in mounting options, and significantly better control options than anything else on the market.

With a dual-direction infinitely variable 'joystick' controller for Throttle and Brake, a second 'Throttle Mode' switch, and two separate buttons, this controller offers way more 'control' than anything else out there. It also works in tandem with our optional PAS sensor (coming soon), so you can easily adjust assist levels on the fly, activate Regen Braking, and control Drive Motor engagement as well (for when you want to pedal without any motor assistance and eliminate drag).

With a built-in rechargeable battery and Micro-USB port plus two battery/signal LEDs, you'll find it incredibly convenient to use as well. And we've also figured out a clever way to attach the throttle to the battery pack using a high-strength magnetic attachment point. It's super-quick to snap on/off and makes the whole Install/Remove for SR4 as fast and easy as possible.

This has taken a ton of work, and for competitive reasons we've kept it under wraps for as long as possible, but at long last we're ready to share it with our Backers. We hope you like it!

And finally, an update on mounting options: if you recall, we've told you previously that the new SR4 design supports multiple mounting options, including both front and rear wheel installations (as a reminder, you will still be given a chance to update your mount options prior to shipment). So let's look at all the mount options more closely:

Zooming in on some close-ups - first of the Front Universal Mount (note that we have Front U-Mounts that fit both Suspension and Non-Suspension forks, as well as both V-Brakes, Disc Brakes, and Side-pull brakes):

And a perspective view of the Rear Wheel Kickstand Bracket U-Mount - we were thrilled to validate that the SR4 will fit between the pedal cranks and chainring of most bike types:

And finally, of the Rear Wheel Seatpost U-Mount and Rear Wheel Topeak MTX Rack Mount. Note that both of these mounts also offer the option to attach the Battery Pack to the mount itself, making for a 'one-piece' ShareRoller installation. And since they are both Quick-Release designs, these can be installed in seconds even for the first installation, and without a single tool! A great option for Rental Bikes or other situations where you want to ride a 'loaner' bike:

[IMG]https://ci3.googleusercontent.com/proxy/9z7VlSjP3avUZbKAJ6_6AkG2jdq5k8dXlHkBLUuh7MXAlZdw12P-EZzSBH-bqpsBdnQuUlNEeysBxld9JfvSlRkwOQJcwNZyj2S4FFhxGWQoHkH3fjQsnvQ2189kRSAY62zyt590DNOvVrbhs5HlivR2s0lP0oWoRbTQsCnBBg=s0-d-e1-ft#http://media.campaigner.com/media/64/643200/SR4%20Seatpost-Topeak%20UM%20Perspectives.jpg?g=1516602706343[/IMG]

Keep in mind that our Front Universal Bike Mount will also work on any other platform with V-Brakes, including many Folding Bikes (Dahons for example), Kick Bikes (Sidewalker, KickBike America, Amish) and some Kick Scooters (like the Sidewalker Micro we have here in our office).

In addition to the amazing new set of Universal Bike Mounts, we also are busy with our 3D Scanner finalizing Custom Mounts for unique folding bikes, trikes, and scooters. Here's a partial list of what we're developing - if anyone has any specific requests, please let us know:

Folding Bikes:
- Brompton
- Strida

Trikes:
- Trikke T78

Kick Scooters:
- Hudora Big Wheel Air Dual-Brake
- KickPed
- Razor A5/A6
- Micro PedalFlow

To give you a sense of how our Custom Mounts work, here's an image of 3D-scanned Brompton with a Custom Mount (we hope our Brompton backers are as thrilled as we are that the new SR4 can remain on the bike when folding without any interference!):

[IMG]https://ci3.googleusercontent.com/proxy/w81Vp35okTVpOM4A3J-VsF6sDNhk7hZaYsL_q3Kr3WM3jwlOfiqshLHtyMiwKS8lJw9XpbG2ir622BNtwdHLPl1dCzUEacZ83ZR4lH22rRrADPR8vGWFGROKFbKGjVkuApomMYVsUwcVzBiLCEMnCg=s0-d-e1-ft#http://media.campaigner.com/media/64/643200/Brompton%20Mount%20_%20SR4.jpg?g=1516606712215[/IMG]

And one last detail: here is how our quick-release mount for the Battery Packs works (you've probably been wondering how we could keep the sub-10 second install/remove of the 1-piece ShareRoller when moving to a separate, frame-mounted Battery Pack). The solution? It uses the Topeak QR CageMount removable water bottle mounting system - a robust and affordable system that's easy to install on every bike you own. Here's how it works:

[IMG]https://ci6.googleusercontent.com/proxy/8VrhDF4eP2nqyglNHlWo1EL8DAKCezVhneelQlrRZlKDKDRDjKkDXVw6amnFzGH14Gtz3tSph-q-q3uYwygAa4ezRc-6-k9xWQiRmda1rnd-zfWAIQCeHTN5cSuwbp-v0NG8kBr0h1-ZeKOm4fqPz3AJOHmF3DztZgA=s0-d-e1-ft#http://media.campaigner.com/media/64/643200/SR4%20Topeak%20Batt%20Pack%20System3.jpg?g=1516657872485[/IMG]

And since it mounts to the bike using standard water bottle braze-ons, if your bike (or scooter) doesn't have braze-ons, many off-the-shelf products are available to easily add them on (secured via velcro, zip-ties, or clamps - we'll provide a list of our favorites later).

And if you want to use ShareRoller on a compatible bike share system (please consult your system operator first), you'll prefer our Multi-Mount Battery Pack option. It's a little bit bulkier, but allows you to have both bike share triangle pockets as well as a Topeak QR CageMount bracket disposed on the same Battery Pack:

[IMG]https://ci6.googleusercontent.com/proxy/IWNpzzAwm-SM67mAFySale3RsAXisw_3GDkMZnRuf5qIdVE3_acaJTjfM1w1wxPzcSN1ci-S_qO8xRB9auVFvA1a9M70g1-HizeviPLnIQCbeNOR2GIOMIkde5PCH_-Uzs5zT-p5tuAaje4MWUBzNCoPll21X1wanhs=s0-d-e1-ft#http://media.campaigner.com/media/64/643200/SR4%20BP%20Multi-Mount%20Comparison3.jpg?g=1516657926447[/IMG]

Whew, that's it for now. We hope this gigantic email made its way into your Inbox successfully. And that you found the time to read it all!

We'll keep you posted as we finish photo and video shoots and move to re-launch http://www.shareroller.com - so there's lots of great content on the way. And of course we will keep you updated on the progress of our last straggling supplier deliveries.

Thank you again for your patience and support.

Jeff Guida & The ShareRoller Team

Nirmala
4 weeks ago

Another update from ShareRoller today with another delay, but also lots of new details about and images of the device:

Hello ShareRoller Indiegogo backer:

First off, our apologies for the long delay in getting out this Update - we have been absolutely scrambling over the past two months trying to get every component shipped to us before our China suppliers shut down for the Chinese New Year (CNY) holiday, which falls on Feb 16th this year. The Chinese New Year is a 3-week+ shutdown for ALL factories that we were trying our hardest to avoid...

Unfortunately, we didn't make it and now several suppliers will not be able to deliver components until after the break, namely our Battery Pack and Wireless Controller suppliers. This means it will be the end of February at the earliest before we can expect to receive these components, and more than likely will slip into March, given the slow start-up that is common after this holiday. This is an enormously frustrating scheduling impact for us, and we understand it is equally painful for our Backers as well. Please accept our apologies for this further delay and know that we are doing everything we can.

Several main issues pushed us past the CNY holiday shutdown:

Wireless Controller Waterproofing: During wet weather testing, we discovered that our wireless controller housing was not adequately protected from water ingress. Given the multitude of controls and ports on our remote (Single-axis joystick, two buttons, two switches, and a Micro-USB port), a standard rubber seal was not effective enough. So we had to go back to the drawing board and design a custom latex bladder to enclose all the electronics, and move to an IP67-rated Micro-USB port since that needs to be exposed.

Wireless Controller FCC Certification: We had understood that FCC certification was already completed by our wireless controller supplier, since the base wireless architecture is already in commercial use. Unfortunately, we've learned that Chinese suppliers often complete only CE certification for wireless, since the FCC process is so expensive and time-consuming. So we've had to pay for complete FCC certification on our own, and it's not just expensive but also time-consuming. Hence the delay.

Battery Pack Mold Tooling : We've been unbelievably frustrated at how long it has taken to start the tooling for the battery pack molds. Believe it or not, we paid our deposit for these molds back in April 2017 (!), and we've expected the mold to start month after month after month since then. So we haven't been misleading you when we've said the tooling was about to begin, again and again. To our great frustration, there has been one change request after another from the molding engineers in China, and many of them have not been acceptable, so we've had to go through prolonged back and forth design iterations to find a workable solution. I can count nearly 500 emails this year alone between us and our battery supplier! BUT, at long last the design has passed final approval on both sides and the molds will start tooling this week. Our supplier is doing their best to expedite the lengthy tooling process (normally 6 weeks), so we're hoping to have it done by the end of February, and then Battery Pack assembly can begin (a much quicker process).

Given all of the delays with the Battery Packs, we've unfortunately had to postpone production of the Ultra size packs. However, with the advances in Lithium battery cell tech over the past two years, and the fact that we're using the highest-quality cells on the market (and most expensive!), our Standard packs now have 300 Watt-hours of capacity, nearly 40% more than we originally promised for the Standard pack, and 75% of the range of the original Ultra spec. Regardless, we will still offer partial refunds for all of our Ultra pack Backers, which of course could be applied to extra packs if you wish! And some good news for all the 'Mini' Backers out there too - the final capacity spec is 130 Watt-Hours for the Mini packs, almost 20% more range than originally promised!

Now that all the disappointing news is out of the way, at long last we can show you ALL the glorious details of the final design. We're very sorry to have kept you in the dark for so long on exactly what you would be getting (!), so we're thrilled to finally share all of the pics and details below. We are in the process of updating our website for Pre-Orders, but the photo and video shoots are taking much longer than expected. So in the meantime here is a sneak-preview of the all-new SR4 -apologies for the renders only, but we should have photos soon and will share them with you as soon as do.

First off, here's how the SR4 looks when assembled and carried: the Mini is shown below - it really is tiny:

And here is an annotated pictogram of the assembled SR4 package: Battery Pack + Motor Module + Wireless Remote (again, the Mini version is shown below)

And here is a close-up annotated pictogram of the SR4 Motor Module alone- the feature-packed heart and soul of ShareRoller:

And here are the key measurements of the Mini vs Standard combinations.

And since it's hard to see every detail with two pics, here's a rotating pictorial of the Motor Module so you can see it from every angle:

Now for some detail on SR4's groundbreaking new Automated Traction Control System (ATCS) with Motorized Normal Force Control. This Patent-Pending technology transforms the century-old technology of Friction Drive, making it finally competitive with more common E-Bike powertrains. We've described this to you previously, but here is a LOT more detail - hopefully this will make you appreciate the significance of this advance (and all the work it has entailed!):

Here's a small video animation to sum up how it all works:

And now on to our completely custom wireless controller. We looked at all the available E-Bike and E-Skate throttle systems on the market, and none of them came close to what we wanted for a truly removable and portable system. And none had the feature-packed functionality we desired. So we designed our own implementation (using existing wireless tech), creating a completely unique form factor that gives vastly more versatility in mounting options, and significantly better control options than anything else on the market.

With a dual-direction infinitely variable 'joystick' controller for Throttle and Brake, a second 'Throttle Mode' switch, and two separate buttons, this controller offers way more 'control' than anything else out there. It also works in tandem with our optional PAS sensor (coming soon), so you can easily adjust assist levels on the fly, activate Regen Braking, and control Drive Motor engagement as well (for when you want to pedal without any motor assistance and eliminate drag).

With a built-in rechargeable battery and Micro-USB port plus two battery/signal LEDs, you'll find it incredibly convenient to use as well. And we've also figured out a clever way to attach the throttle to the battery pack using a high-strength magnetic attachment point. It's super-quick to snap on/off and makes the whole Install/Remove for SR4 as fast and easy as possible.

This has taken a ton of work, and for competitive reasons we've kept it under wraps for as long as possible, but at long last we're ready to share it with our Backers. We hope you like it!

And finally, an update on mounting options: if you recall, we've told you previously that the new SR4 design supports multiple mounting options, including both front and rear wheel installations (as a reminder, you will still be given a chance to update your mount options prior to shipment). So let's look at all the mount options more closely:

Zooming in on some close-ups - first of the Front Universal Mount (note that we have Front U-Mounts that fit both Suspension and Non-Suspension forks, as well as both V-Brakes, Disc Brakes, and Side-pull brakes):

And a perspective view of the Rear Wheel Kickstand Bracket U-Mount - we were thrilled to validate that the SR4 will fit between the pedal cranks and chainring of most bike types:

And finally, of the Rear Wheel Seatpost U-Mount and Rear Wheel Topeak MTX Rack Mount. Note that both of these mounts also offer the option to attach the Battery Pack to the mount itself, making for a 'one-piece' ShareRoller installation. And since they are both Quick-Release designs, these can be installed in seconds even for the first installation, and without a single tool! A great option for Rental Bikes or other situations where you want to ride a 'loaner' bike:

[IMG]https://ci3.googleusercontent.com/proxy/9z7VlSjP3avUZbKAJ6_6AkG2jdq5k8dXlHkBLUuh7MXAlZdw12P-EZzSBH-bqpsBdnQuUlNEeysBxld9JfvSlRkwOQJcwNZyj2S4FFhxGWQoHkH3fjQsnvQ2189kRSAY62zyt590DNOvVrbhs5HlivR2s0lP0oWoRbTQsCnBBg=s0-d-e1-ft#http://media.campaigner.com/media/64/643200/SR4%20Seatpost-Topeak%20UM%20Perspectives.jpg?g=1516602706343[/IMG]

Keep in mind that our Front Universal Bike Mount will also work on any other platform with V-Brakes, including many Folding Bikes (Dahons for example), Kick Bikes (Sidewalker, KickBike America, Amish) and some Kick Scooters (like the Sidewalker Micro we have here in our office).

In addition to the amazing new set of Universal Bike Mounts, we also are busy with our 3D Scanner finalizing Custom Mounts for unique folding bikes, trikes, and scooters. Here's a partial list of what we're developing - if anyone has any specific requests, please let us know:

Folding Bikes:
- Brompton
- Strida

Trikes:
- Trikke T78

Kick Scooters:
- Hudora Big Wheel Air Dual-Brake
- KickPed
- Razor A5/A6
- Micro PedalFlow

To give you a sense of how our Custom Mounts work, here's an image of 3D-scanned Brompton with a Custom Mount (we hope our Brompton backers are as thrilled as we are that the new SR4 can remain on the bike when folding without any interference!):

[IMG]https://ci3.googleusercontent.com/proxy/w81Vp35okTVpOM4A3J-VsF6sDNhk7hZaYsL_q3Kr3WM3jwlOfiqshLHtyMiwKS8lJw9XpbG2ir622BNtwdHLPl1dCzUEacZ83ZR4lH22rRrADPR8vGWFGROKFbKGjVkuApomMYVsUwcVzBiLCEMnCg=s0-d-e1-ft#http://media.campaigner.com/media/64/643200/Brompton%20Mount%20_%20SR4.jpg?g=1516606712215[/IMG]

And one last detail: here is how our quick-release mount for the Battery Packs works (you've probably been wondering how we could keep the sub-10 second install/remove of the 1-piece ShareRoller when moving to a separate, frame-mounted Battery Pack). The solution? It uses the Topeak QR CageMount removable water bottle mounting system - a robust and affordable system that's easy to install on every bike you own. Here's how it works:

[IMG]https://ci6.googleusercontent.com/proxy/8VrhDF4eP2nqyglNHlWo1EL8DAKCezVhneelQlrRZlKDKDRDjKkDXVw6amnFzGH14Gtz3tSph-q-q3uYwygAa4ezRc-6-k9xWQiRmda1rnd-zfWAIQCeHTN5cSuwbp-v0NG8kBr0h1-ZeKOm4fqPz3AJOHmF3DztZgA=s0-d-e1-ft#http://media.campaigner.com/media/64/643200/SR4%20Topeak%20Batt%20Pack%20System3.jpg?g=1516657872485[/IMG]

And since it mounts to the bike using standard water bottle braze-ons, if your bike (or scooter) doesn't have braze-ons, many off-the-shelf products are available to easily add them on (secured via velcro, zip-ties, or clamps - we'll provide a list of our favorites later).

And if you want to use ShareRoller on a compatible bike share system (please consult your system operator first), you'll prefer our Multi-Mount Battery Pack option. It's a little bit bulkier, but allows you to have both bike share triangle pockets as well as a Topeak QR CageMount bracket disposed on the same Battery Pack:

[IMG]https://ci6.googleusercontent.com/proxy/IWNpzzAwm-SM67mAFySale3RsAXisw_3GDkMZnRuf5qIdVE3_acaJTjfM1w1wxPzcSN1ci-S_qO8xRB9auVFvA1a9M70g1-HizeviPLnIQCbeNOR2GIOMIkde5PCH_-Uzs5zT-p5tuAaje4MWUBzNCoPll21X1wanhs=s0-d-e1-ft#http://media.campaigner.com/media/64/643200/SR4%20BP%20Multi-Mount%20Comparison3.jpg?g=1516657926447[/IMG]

Whew, that's it for now. We hope this gigantic email made its way into your Inbox successfully. And that you found the time to read it all!

We'll keep you posted as we finish photo and video shoots and move to re-launch http://www.shareroller.com - so there's lots of great content on the way. And of course we will keep you updated on the progress of our last straggling supplier deliveries.

Thank you again for your patience and support.

Jeff Guida & The ShareRoller Team

Hugh
1 month ago

Here are 3 pictures of the tailbox. First shows a side view with it off the trike, you can see the main body in the background raised up in the background. 2nd shows the inside of the box, you can the cutouts that allow acess to the storage area on the sides and the small battery box built for the 12V power for the lights and the 3rd shows a picture of the start of the Dacron covering. It has been glued at the top and still needs gluing along the sides and bottom then ironing and paint.
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Skyhawk4754
1 month ago

At Last my quest which started 5 months ago to get a electric assist trike that could climb hills ( real ones). the learning curve was at times sharp and expensive mistakes were made by me relying on "Bicycle shops to know the answers. In the long run I now feel very confident in this build. The trike takes on a 14-18% grade increase totting 300 lbs plus up the hill with ease and strength.
At the end of the day, if you have the wiliness to learn and you are a DYI person, it is less expensive to go the DYI route. If you have a good bike or trike and want to do a Electric assist converssion, do alot of reading and find a good builder ( who also has some of the parts you will need) ask alot of questions and you will do GREAT!!!!

What a JOY this has been to build and I have met a lot of truly great and honest people along the way.
Thank you to West Coast Ebikes and Green Werks for all your encouragement.
Willie

Dewey
1 month ago

No way around it you’ll stick out, http://bikearlingtonforum.com/showthread.php?9519-ELF-pedal-electric-car-on-W-amp-OD early adopter tried using an elf on the bike trails in the northern Virginia suburbs and attracted a lot of adverse attention from regular cyclists. He reports he mostly tries to stick to the road shoulder now, kind of like the straight story, but he’s reported a recent http://bikearlingtonforum.com/showthread.php?12467-ELF-and-Car-collide-on-Route-7 where he was side swiped by a car turning into a gas station. I suggest you would be better off on a regular ebike with a velotop or a good cape if you want to stay dry, and an electric trike if you want the recumbent seat and a trike will be much narrower than an elf and accepted on bike trails.

MikeDD
1 month ago

Liberty Trikes is online only. They also have a user's Facebook page. I believe the current price is $1499 including shipping. They may still be backordered. The frames are made in the US. The trikes are assembled in Philadelphia. We live on a hill which prevented my wife and me from ridding a bike due to our age and her MS. I have a Rad Mini and she can climb any hill I climb. She cannot go off road though.

MikeDD
1 month ago

My wife has a Liberty Trike. Because of the stability of any trike in turns, she keeps her speed under 10 mph on downhills. We have found that Liberty Trike is very responsive to any questions or problems. They also have a facebook page.

1600wattScott
1 month ago

Thanks. My wife had a Greenspeed with a 500w Das-kit, rack mount battery before. When I planned her new Catrike Dumont my goal was high torque and low center of gravity. I mounted the Bafang 750w motor on the bottom of the boom and the 14ah battery way down on the frame just behind the seat. She says it's perfect, handles like a Lamborghini with Cadillac smooth ride. I have built quite a few trikes this way for customers and it's a real hit.

Richard D
4 days ago

Jeez, I don't think most of these things work, every vid I click on it's folks standing there talking about them! I want to see them go, fast! And why do they all cycle them with the pedals at the same time, even down hill? That's the whole fecking point about an e bike isn't it, no pedalling?

Flavio Symes
3 weeks ago

Dude........love your reviews! Plus you are so cute.....love ur energy.

TheSolidPlaya
3 weeks ago

hello,fun...... lol, does it even have an exclamation mark 11 mph, also you know you can get 1000w, even 2000W motors that can operate at 250W, 11 mph, jesus, i think mine does about 45 mph , i dont know how those store brands can thrive when china is selling motors for 200 and batteries for 200 aswell but here we are!

MrPOFEG
3 weeks ago

High quality and GREAT fun trike and superb video.Thank You, fall in love in this device

David Macdonald
4 weeks ago

Slow overpriced, and what's the clattering noise as the wheels go round click click click click

Derek Thompson
1 month ago

Front wheel motors I think are dangerous as its putting all the stress on the front wheel now a MID-MOUNT (pedal crank motor) is far more stable as the motor is in a lower centre of gravity and the battery on the down tube as well is the best place to put it particularly if you use that ridiculous 750 watt motor limit in the USA (way too much power on a tricycle) which I think is mostly designed for Seniors or people with balance problems.

JOE ESTEP
2 months ago

What a jerk. The trike is the star.

Ronald Scott
2 months ago

Great video! I just purchased a custom work trike that I'm having a hard time being able to balance it, which I wasn't expecting. It's outfitted with a cabinet between the two back wheels--which appear to be of similar width as yours. For a beginner, what would you recommend? I kinda wanna widens the rear axle for better stability. Any help is greatly appreciated. Thanks!

wingplum
2 months ago

INo rear differential, I think the German made is better.

brian mci
3 months ago

I like...

NWforager
3 months ago

my Dad Needs something just like this bad

Sohail Mohmed
3 months ago

Very very nice

Eye on art
3 months ago

They have three wheeled motorcycles that do not tip!

Eye on art
3 months ago

11 miles per hour. lets see I live 11 miles to store 11 miles back 30 minute shopping so that means two and a half hours! no wayl not worth $3.000 dollars.

Al Pepitone
4 weeks ago

It is to a disabled person.

Eye on art
3 months ago

Oh yea $2995 for this for that price it should have wings!

Eye on art
3 months ago

Price to high it is not a car. not affordable for everyone. greed pricing! waiting for Sondors to make one that will be affordable for everyone!

Dennis Gaffney
3 months ago

Capitalism is a predatory system

Eye on art
4 months ago

$3,000 this is not a car, that price is price gouging. lower price sells more high price sells less I hope Sondors comes out with an affordable one for everyone

David trueslayor
4 months ago

1 more thing about the speed of these is the battery size what depicts the speed or is the battery strictly for run time ? What does affect speed ? And since you do reviews what if someone who didn't feel he could balance a 2 wheeler but wanted some balls with His bike where would he look ? Thanks again David

David trueslayor
4 months ago

My question was about its power, then I saw a discussion below but didn't answer my question, Do you give up power/mph with the Trike compared to the 2 wheeler version ?
I am 6"4' 250 but have lupus & severe neuropathy so I am looking for a why to get out , anyways can this be outfitted with a sun shade/roof etc. ? Thanks David