20,000 Kilometer Check-In

Eric Kuyper

New Member
In my previous post, I quipped that my Electric Bike Company Model S (Step Thru) was calibrated in Kilometers so that the odometer "flips" at 10k kilometers, not 10k miles, so I decided to just give in and try to start working in Kilometers. We will eventually join the rest of the world, right?

I've had the bike just under 2 years now, and the bike has remained very mechanically sound. I've had to replace the (might use wrong terms) bottom bracket, the thing that connects the pedals as there was some play in it, but the mechanic said that's normal wear and tear at that distance. Changed break pads a few times, literally have not had to unseal or touch the hydraulic portion of the breaks. Tires/tubes as applicable. No issues with the electronics. So how about the battery after arguably 500ish cycles?

I figured since I was going to cross the 20k mark, I might as well try for my personal best in time and distance. So I'm up at the crack of dawn for a trip from Costa Mesa to Venice, CA. And back. Google and Strava say 116 miles, the odometer say's 113, but either way it was 10:15 time in the seat with level 1 power assist. Both the bike and I were on our last breaths coming up the driveway. I personally estimate the battery is at about 85-90% of what it was originally, but whatever it was at the beginning, it's still plenty now for getting around town.

Look at their website and they tout what amounts to a cute beach cruiser, which it can be too, but beyond that it's a tough urban bike that can handle the worst streets of Wilmington and Carson and Harbor City, and then back to the ocean and scenic bike paths.

 
Eric, that's an impressive day in the saddle. Congrats!

There are the majority of the days when we just set out to do our bike runs close to home. These runs make up that bulk of mileage accumulated on the odometer. Then there are those days when we set out to do something alot more challenging; a ride into that unknown testing our limits of endurance and mental toughness. To put our bikes to the limit, as well. Everything is the same, yet different on those long rides. The cool thing about ebiking (or standard bicycling for that matter) is that a personal best can be anything we want it to be, from doing that first 10 mile bike ride to what you just pulled off with your own ebike.
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
In my previous post, I quipped that my Electric Bike Company Model S (Step Thru) was calibrated in Kilometers so that the odometer "flips" at 10k kilometers, not 10k miles, so I decided to just give in and try to start working in Kilometers. We will eventually join the rest of the world, right?

I've had the bike just under 2 years now, and the bike has remained very mechanically sound. I've had to replace the (might use wrong terms) bottom bracket, the thing that connects the pedals as there was some play in it, but the mechanic said that's normal wear and tear at that distance. Changed break pads a few times, literally have not had to unseal or touch the hydraulic portion of the breaks. Tires/tubes as applicable. No issues with the electronics. So how about the battery after arguably 500ish cycles?

I figured since I was going to cross the 20k mark, I might as well try for my personal best in time and distance. So I'm up at the crack of dawn for a trip from Costa Mesa to Venice, CA. And back. Google and Strava say 116 miles, the odometer say's 113, but either way it was 10:15 time in the seat with level 1 power assist. Both the bike and I were on our last breaths coming up the driveway. I personally estimate the battery is at about 85-90% of what it was originally, but whatever it was at the beginning, it's still plenty now for getting around town.

Look at their website and they tout what amounts to a cute beach cruiser, which it can be too, but beyond that it's a tough urban bike that can handle the worst streets of Wilmington and Carson and Harbor City, and then back to the ocean and scenic bike paths.

Fantastic!
When you start crossing 5 digit ODO numbers on an E-bike, these things will blow away every other vehicle on the market for efficiency and benefits.
If someone does only 500-1000 miles a year, the benefits are still there but not significant. Considering the cost depreciation, battery degradation, technology growth, you wonder if its worth $4K for an E-bike.
But, once you start crossing 6-7K miles a year, the benefits becomes significantly more (exponential, I would say) and investment is paid off in a short time.
Better physical and mental health, less wear and tear on your other vehicles, lower risk of cardiac malfunction, for me... the best is... I could eat 10 cinnabons and still not see any change in my weight :)
 

Citycrosser

Active Member
Eric, in your other post you mentioned that your wife has the same bike. I’m thinking of getting the Model S for my daughter but I’m concerned about the weight of the bike. My daughter is 5’4” and 120 pounds. She runs track and cross country and bikes a fair bit too but this bike seems heavy at 60 pounds. Your thoughts on the weight?
 

Eric Kuyper

New Member
My daughter is almost exactly the same size, maybe an inch taller, and has no problems with handling the bike. She used to borrow it often when she worked near the beach and driving was inconvenient. Based on her height, I'd say that she's about the height minimum that I'd recommend for the bike

However, as you say she's a track runner and bicyclist, she will find the bike comfortable to ride with proper leg extension, easy to mount with the S style frame, and while she will need to extend her feet at stops; any cycle with a seat properly adjusted will suffer the same fate.

If she only wanted to use the throttle and ride around town, she could lower the seat to to point where she was flat-footed at a stop, but that of course means a less aggressive position.

I like my daughter riding it because it's just like a beach cruiser that she's used to, only with more get up and go. Best luck and safe travels to your daughter.