2019 Raleigh Redux IE Step Over -First 70 miles commuting

NorthWestRider

New Member
My previous ebike experience: None, other than a dozen test rides of other bikes.

Purpose: Commuting. About 17 miles each way, 1.5 miles of which are gravel. A couple very big hills.

My first impression is that it looks pretty plain Jane looking which is exactly what I wanted. My second choice bike would have been the Trek Super Commuter+ 8s but that flashy red paint and higher price tag pushed me over to the Raleigh. I expected the Fit and Finish of the bike to be better but after breaking down the cost of the Kiox, Bosch Performance motor, and 500w battery, there's not a ton of budget left for the bike. Don't get me wrong, it feels solid on the road but little things like the battery fitment and the plastic plug housing for the charging port feel cheap. The plastic plug housing actually fell off the first time I opened the rubber plug cover...I might flag it to be fixed if it keeps falling off because I know I will lose it. Anyways, enough with my gripes about the bike.

First commute: Of course there was a light rain (I am in Seattle after all) but that didn't deter me from riding in. The fenders did an amazing job keeping 99% of the splatter off me. I only got a tiny bit shooting out the front of the front fender and back at me. I would have been soaked if I was riding my mountain bike which has minimal fenders. I didn't have any worry about loss of traction and the bike felt planted on the road and gravel trail, even at 45mph+ down my steep loose gravel portion of my commute. I call this hill my cup of coffee.

Battery life and power: I'm using about 55% of my battery each way in Turbo mode so I am glad I picked up a second charger to keep in the office. I always keep my lights on as well. I'm still amazed at how "natural" the feeling is with the motor assisting. I thought it would feel more mechanical and jerky but that's not the case at all. Even when I go over that 28mph threshold I hardly notice. I have to look down at the speedo to tell most of the time when going downhill. I didn't realize how much faster I am getting to work and home until I compare my stats with my non-assisted bike. I'm cutting my times both ways almost in half. 11mph avg unassisted and 21mph assisted. The e-bike also allows me to ride all the way to work without getting sweaty. For me this matters since I do not have showers at work. My only option with my unassisted bike is to take the bus to work, but then ride the full way home. If my work provided showers I probably wouldn't have ventured into ebikes.

Conclusion: I'll still commute with my FSR 29er a couple days a week as I love my urban jumps, stairs, and drops, but the Raleigh is my new daily driver. There is plenty of summer left so hopefully I can put 1000+ miles in before winter and provide another update. It's great to be a part of this community and I've been a lurker learning from y'all for longer than I'd like to admit. Comparing EBR reviews along with real user reviews has probably consumed every idle moment of my life so far this year.
 

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Mtl_Biker

Active Member
Great report, and welcome to the forum!

I would have looked at the Raleigh but there wasn’t a dealer close enough to me. I finally chose Giant and I’m expecting delivery on Tuesday so I’m not yet an e-bike rider.

My commute (full distance) is just over 30 km, and with my clunker commuting bike I’m actually driving to the halfway point and riding from there. Because at my age (67) the ride home after a tough day and into a strong prevailing headwind with high humidity is just a bit too much. With the e-bike I’ll be doing the full distance both ways. (I already did it once with a demo e-bike my dealer lent me.)
 
It looks ugly as heck. But I like that! I am considering this because it is cheaper than some I think might be better but not worth spending too much extra on. I guess a lot depends if I can get any discounts or sales.
 

Mtl_Biker

Active Member
Omaha has two Raleigh shops, but neither one has the bike in the shop. That complicates things, I think.
I learned the hard way that you really need to actually sit on (preferably even ride) the bike you are considering, and it must be in the size you would order. Don't just assume that the next frame size up or down would be right without actually trying it. Not having any stock at your local dealers is certainly a problem. And if you find the right bike somewhere else, would your local dealers even be able to service it?

Are there any e-bikes sold and supported by your local dealers?
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
That complicates things, I think.
It doesn't.

They can order it thru the internal system and once it arrives, you can take possession.
For testing purposes, try few different bikes similar to that one and you will have fairly good idea. Stem, handlebar, seat etc. can adjusted to get the right fit.

Raleigh will actually ship it to the store of your choice. Look into the cart carefully and you may find few choices.

1572468511308.png
 
I learned the hard way that you really need to actually sit on (preferably even ride) the bike you are considering, and it must be in the size you would order. Don't just assume that the next frame size up or down would be right without actually trying it. Not having any stock at your local dealers is certainly a problem. And if you find the right bike somewhere else, would your local dealers even be able to service it?

Are there any e-bikes sold and supported by your local dealers?
3 trek dealers in town and a specialized dealer a
Mile away from my house. I am considering one bike from each company.
 

Mtl_Biker

Active Member
Buy one
Bike. Not sure which bike it will be. A Raleigh, a trek, or a specialized.
You do know I was joking, right?

Anyway, Trek and Specialized are both great brands, and even if the Raleigh might be as good, my opinion is that I'd go with a bike I could have serviced and supported locally. Good luck with your search!
 
You do know I was joking, right?

Anyway, Trek and Specialized are both great brands, and even if the Raleigh might be as good, my opinion is that I'd go with a bike I could have serviced and supported locally. Good luck with your search!
I thought you were joking since Smiley faces. 😀
 

FlatSix911

Active Member
My previous ebike experience: None, other than a dozen test rides of other bikes.

Purpose: Commuting. About 17 miles each way, 1.5 miles of which are gravel. A couple very big hills.

My first impression is that it looks pretty plain Jane looking which is exactly what I wanted. My second choice bike would have been the Trek Super Commuter+ 8s but that flashy red paint and higher price tag pushed me over to the Raleigh. I expected the Fit and Finish of the bike to be better but after breaking down the cost of the Kiox, Bosch Performance motor, and 500w battery, there's not a ton of budget left for the bike. Don't get me wrong, it feels solid on the road but little things like the battery fitment and the plastic plug housing for the charging port feel cheap. The plastic plug housing actually fell off the first time I opened the rubber plug cover...I might flag it to be fixed if it keeps falling off because I know I will lose it. Anyways, enough with my gripes about the bike.

First commute: Of course there was a light rain (I am in Seattle after all) but that didn't deter me from riding in. The fenders did an amazing job keeping 99% of the splatter off me. I only got a tiny bit shooting out the front of the front fender and back at me. I would have been soaked if I was riding my mountain bike which has minimal fenders. I didn't have any worry about loss of traction and the bike felt planted on the road and gravel trail, even at 45mph+ down my steep loose gravel portion of my commute. I call this hill my cup of coffee.

Battery life and power: I'm using about 55% of my battery each way in Turbo mode so I am glad I picked up a second charger to keep in the office. I always keep my lights on as well. I'm still amazed at how "natural" the feeling is with the motor assisting. I thought it would feel more mechanical and jerky but that's not the case at all. Even when I go over that 28mph threshold I hardly notice. I have to look down at the speedo to tell most of the time when going downhill. I didn't realize how much faster I am getting to work and home until I compare my stats with my non-assisted bike. I'm cutting my times both ways almost in half. 11mph avg unassisted and 21mph assisted. The e-bike also allows me to ride all the way to work without getting sweaty. For me this matters since I do not have showers at work. My only option with my unassisted bike is to take the bus to work, but then ride the full way home. If my work provided showers I probably wouldn't have ventured into ebikes.

Conclusion: I'll still commute with my FSR 29er a couple days a week as I love my urban jumps, stairs, and drops, but the Raleigh is my new daily driver. There is plenty of summer left so hopefully I can put 1000+ miles in before winter and provide another update. It's great to be a part of this community and I've been a lurker learning from y'all for longer than I'd like to admit. Comparing EBR reviews along with real user reviews has probably consumed every idle moment of my life so far this year.
Nice review... here is the EBR version. ;)


Summary
  • A sleek, purpose built high speed ebike, with excellent weight distribution and smooth power transfer, 10-speed drivetrain and powerful hydraulic disc brakes to match
  • Stiff thru-axles and a rigid Aluminum alloy fork are balanced out by fatter 2.0" Schwalbe tires, great for comfort and varied urban terrain
  • Available in three frame sizes for improved fit, durable chain-guide doubles as a bash guard, grippy pedals, locking grips and adjustable kickstand, great electric system and great display
  • A little more ridged from last years model, however this can improve responsiveness, connecting you to the bike's agile experience


1572492743826.png
 
  • I’m
  • Nice review... here is the EBR version. ;)


    Summary

    • A sleek, purpose built high speed ebike, with excellent weight distribution and smooth power transfer, 10-speed drivetrain and powerful hydraulic disc brakes to match
    • Stiff thru-axles and a rigid Aluminum alloy fork are balanced out by fatter 2.0" Schwalbe tires, great for comfort and varied urban terrain
    • Available in three frame sizes for improved fit, durable chain-guide doubles as a bash guard, grippy pedals, locking grips and adjustable kickstand, great electric system and great display
    • A little more ridged from last years model, however this can improve responsiveness, connecting you to the bike's agile experience
    [*]

    View attachment 40833
    can a larger battery fit imto
  • This bike?
 

FlatSix911

Active Member
  • I’m can a larger battery fit into this bike?
Not likely... here is what the reviewer said about the battery pack.

Powering the 2019 Redux iE is a high-capacity Bosch PowerPack 500 offering 36 volts and 13.4 amp hours for nearly 500 watt hours of capacity. It’s one of the most widespread electric bike batteries in the world right now and uses the same form factor and mounting interface as the older, lower capacity, Bosch PowerPack 400. This means that finding replacements, borrowing additional packs, or renting batteries when traveling becomes much easier. The plastic casing is durable but lightweight, especially compared to the new PowerTube 500 which weighs ~6.3lbs verses ~5.7lbs. PowerPack batteries do stand out a bit visually because they mount on top of the frame tubing, but Raleigh has done their best to sink the battery down into the downtube and even added a plastic shield to cover the top portion, blending it into the frame beautifully. The pack clicks down and secures with a high quality ABUS Ampero locking core. You can order locks and other accessories to match this key, reducing clutter and making it simpler to unlock the bike and battery. I noticed that the core is spring loaded, so you don’t need to insert and twist the key when mounting the pack… just be sure to push down until you hear it click.

Raleigh dealers (and really any Bosch certified ebike dealer) can help you adjust the mounting interface over time if you notice rattling or loosening, it’s a durable convenient design. And, that goes for the charger as well. With half a kilowatt-hour of capacity in this battery, the faster 4-amp Bosch charger allows you to spend more time riding vs. waiting, and yet it’s about the same size and in some cases lighter than many generic 2-amp chargers included with cheaper e-bikes. I like the wide proprietary plug design as well, because it isn’t likely to be mixed up with other chargers or get broken as easily. You can charge this battery on or off the bike frame, making it great for commuters who need to charge inside at work, and you won’t be as likely to drop the battery during transport because it has a big plastic loop handle at the top. To maximize the life of this and most Lithium-ion batteries, try to keep it above 20% capacity and avoid extreme heat and cold. If you know you won’t be riding for some time, store at ~50% to reduce stress on the Lithium-ion cell chemistry.
 

John K

New Member
I too now own a 2019 Redux. Did own the Yamaha Cross Core (pictured) but had serious trouble with forks, or more likely head tube. After five fork replacements my dealer offered a full refund as trade in. I originally had my eye on a couple of Cubes. But they didn’t have my size left in the 2019’s. A couple of the shop employees suggested I try the Raleigh. I was hesitant at first, but instantly loved it my first test ride. Compared to the Yamaha it feels so solid and sporty at the same time. Plus my wife had just bought a 28mph Turbo Vado, so the faster pedal assist appealed to me.
Since it is set up as a commuter I am instantly back to commuting...at least until the weather gets too cold and wet.
I really like the Kiox display. However, I must be missing something. I can’t find the screen showing kcal‘s and total mileage. Plus the Bosch app. doesn’t seem to do much even though it has paired with my phone. Anyway, bottom line is I think I am going to be much happier with the Redux over the Cross Core.
 

John K

New Member
Quick update...just found out if I take the Kiox display off the bike and turn it on I get different information including total mileage.👍
 

Solar Roller

New Member
Quick update...just found out if I take the Kiox display off the bike and turn it on I get different information including total mileage.👍
I'll be picking up one of these soon. The shop I work at has two in stock. I've found that the total mileage can be found in the Settings under Information.

Also, regarding the charge port cover, it is a lousy design with a relatively simple fix. I removed the cover from the bike and put about 5 wraps of electrical tape around the battery side of the cover assembly, trimmed it, and wrapped it around the edge of the cover sleeve. This acts as a shim to keep the cover away from the frame just enough to let the cover snap closed properly. It also doubles to thicken up the sleeve so it won't fall out of the bike. I can post a picture of this mod tomorrow if anyone is interested.
 

John K

New Member
I'll be picking up one of these soon. The shop I work at has two in stock. I've found that the total mileage can be found in the Settings under Information.

Also, regarding the charge port cover, it is a lousy design with a relatively simple fix. I removed the cover from the bike and put about 5 wraps of electrical tape around the battery side of the cover assembly, trimmed it, and wrapped it around the edge of the cover sleeve. This acts as a shim to keep the cover away from the frame just enough to let the cover snap closed properly. It also doubles to thicken up the sleeve so it won't fall out of the bike. I can post a picture of this mod tomorrow if anyone is interested.
I found that as well...regarding total mileage. I’d be interested in seeing your fix for the charge port cover. My other concern with it is that the hinge will eventually break. It seems like pretty cheap plastic. However, it certainly doesn’t detract from the overall enjoyment of the bike.
 

Solar Roller

New Member
Charge port covers across many of the eBikes I've come across all seem to be poorly designed with the exception of some XLR charge connectors, the ones that have the swiveling hard cover built into the port (these I like). Rubber covers eventually tear, Bosch ones seem to be either difficult to snap back into place or are untethered caps that can get lost easily. Shimano covers are better, but their eMTB magnetic covers are untethered. Brose covers don't seem to stay closed. Universally, way too many of them are in the path of the crank arms, making it easy to break the port, the charger, or usually both (Yamaha). Don't get me started about the flaws with Suntour's charge connector.

When I saw the cover on the Redux, I felt it (and the cover attached to the battery) were tacky, but honestly most charge port covers these days are. At least the Redux has a simple fix, plus both the key and charge port are out of the way of the pedals. I'll post a picture once I get to work.