28 mph is FAST!

Chris Hammond

Well-Known Member
What do you mean?

I have a Juiced CrossCurrent Air, and upgraded to CCS display and controller. I ride in the rain all the time and it's fine.

I am asking because I'm interested in upgrading to 52V battery. You said none of the electronics can handle the rain, does that include display? Because it's been fine for me... or maybe I just got lucky?
So Juiced uses the same industry standard for water resistance for electronics that nearly all ebike makers use. Also, I have no idea where he got the idea that Juiced 52V
What do you mean?

I have a Juiced CrossCurrent Air, and upgraded to CCS display and controller. I ride in the rain all the time and it's fine.

I am asking because I'm interested in upgrading to 52V battery. You said none of the electronics can handle the rain, does that include display? Because it's been fine for me... or maybe I just got lucky?
Juiced uses the same standard for electronic water resistance as the rest of the ebike world, and I haven't seen any reports of water intrusion as an issue with Juiced. I have never had any issues with rain and I commute on my bike so I have been caught riding in wery wet conditions many times.
As for his comment about 52V batteries being unreliable, I have no idea where he got that idea. Again I haven't seen or heard any such problems. I have over 5000 miles on my Juiced 52V pack with zero issues. The only issue I have heard about regarding battery problems with Juiced is a few people that have had problems with the pack not locking into place securely, creating intermittent power loss. This occurs with both the 48V or 52V packs as it is an external problem.
For clarification, several people with new bikes are not getting the packs secured correctly due to user error. I had this problem several times when my bike was new. I would put the pack in place, start riding, and have power loss after hitting a bump. At this time I could pull the pack off without using the key, indicating that the pack was not fully secured in the first place. Hitting it into place solved the problem, and after a few months of use, it became much easier to fully secure the pack in place.
There are a few that actually have had a real problem that was not fixed by repositioning the pack, and have had Juiced send them replacement locking mechanisms.
 

Toomanycats

Active Member
Re: Speed, stability (aka. balance) and control.
My experience covers motorcycles as well as bicycles and ebikes. Road conditions, weather and traffic are the major factors when your on two wheels.
On a ridged frame bicycle, the road conditions impact the rider directly as the riders weight plus the bikes is all unsprung weight (Estimated rider 180 lb. bike 30 lb = 210 lb). The only suspension/cushion is the tire air pressure. So, when your tire hits something, it bounces off it like a ball and you the ride have to compensate for the impact by shifting your weight to maintain your balance. (Kodoos to the roadies that have mastered this)!
Add a full suspension (as in a mountain bike type) and you've eliminated 95% of that unsprung weight so when you hit something, the suspension absorbs the impacts. Some mtb. riders even run extremely low tire pressure for better traction and less bounce.
Adding speed reduces your reaction time. Once you've hit something be it sand, wet spots, ruts, pot holes ext. the time for you to respond before losing your balance is reduced proportionately. At 28 mph its 41 ft/ sec. I can speak for mtn. biking speeds at an average 6 mph (8.8 mph) I can recover from some extreme bumps.
Sharing the road with cars, trucks and motorcycles, I'm the slowest vehicle on the road. My top speed is 23 mph so I average 13 mph for longer battery life. I ride a 26 inch fatty with a 500 w battery and hub motor with a front suspension fork and seat post (bike weight 70 lb). I added blinkers to my bike front and rear for visibility and DPW orange rims. I ride on the far right side of the road and stay alert to vehicles passing me.

I hope this helps
This does help. It explains why simply adding a motor and battery to a conventional bike frame does not a good e bike make. It also explains why the LBS where I bought my bike recommended that I buy a suspension seatpost(I have decent quality front shocks). I wish I’d listened now.
 

bikerjohn

Well-Known Member
In my original post when I stated I found it unsettling to ride that fast I in no way was referring to the bikes performance, it is quite stable at any speed, I was pointing out my lack of ability at my age to ride that fast safely. I am 76 and a fall at that speed would most likely be my last. I was only at that speed for a short time to see what the bike was capable of. I know there are many Younger riders that run those speeds all the time but youth gives you reflexes and vision and agility no longer in my arsenal. We all slow down in time..
I had a friend named Jerry who is in heaven now. A very experienced ride leader for years. As age crept in, he decided to no longer be a ride leader, and that certainly was a good idea for him. One of his best years participating in organized rides was his last year on earth. At typical weekday group ride, Jerry accompanied the group from the sweep position. As an increasingly conservative cyclist he would ride the front brake on even modest downhill portions of the ride. Often, seeing motor vehicle traffic in his rear view mirror, Jerry would slow down and move onto the shoulder. The last time he rode, Jerry was in that sweep position and as traffic approached from behind he did his usual cautious maneuver. This time his front wheel gabbed into the soft shoulder and flipped the bike. Locked in the pedals, he landed on his neck and shoulder and became paralyzed from the neck down. At the age of 73 Jerry's over cautious cycling ended his joy and ability to not only cycle but to ever walk again.