Ancheer Mountain Bike Performance, Range, and Hill Test (Ancheer Model AN-EB001)

Court sent me an Ancheer Ebike for testing that Mikey had reviewed prior, thanks Court and Mikey! Not surprisingly, it failed during testing...

Here's the data, with a failure summary toward the end:


Electric Bike Test Lab Test Report of:

Ancheer Mountain Bike (Model AN-EB001)

Tested in August of 2019 by

Jason Holmes (Chief Engineer and Owner)

Summary of Test Results

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  • Braking Distance from 20 mph: 33.2 feet
  • Brake Fade: Severe
  • Real World Range on Highest PAS (High): N/A
  • Max Speed Throttle Only: 17 mph (non-adjustable)
  • Zero to 5 mph Throttle Only: 2.7 seconds
  • Zero to 17 mph Throttle Only: 15.9 seconds
  • Max Assisted Speed: 17 mph (non-adjustable)
  • Zero to 17 mph with zero effort spinning: 16.2 seconds
  • Zero to 17 mph with moderate pedaling: 12.3 seconds
  • Throttle only hill climb: 0.17 miles before stopping at 1:00 (average speed of 9.9 mph)
  • 100 Watts of pedaling hill climb: 0.27 miles before stopping at 2:36, average speed of 6.2 mph, average pedal power of 101 watts.
  • Complete hill climb: One mile long hill completed in 6:55, average speed of 8.5 mph, average pedal power of 186 watts. NOTE: The motor stopped just short of the crest – ebike inoperable after that. Failure determined to be motor controller, most likely due to overheating. Read below for more.

Ebike Specs of Note

  • Motor type: Rear wheel mounted geared hub
  • Rated power: 250 watts
  • Battery Details: 36 volts, 8.0 amp-hour = 288 watt-hours
  • Claimed weight: About 20 kg (44.1 lbs)
  • Actual Weight: 47 lbs
  • Brakes: Mechanical Discs
  • Cadence or Torque: Cadence only
  • Mileage at time of test: ~30



General Testing Notes

For all of EBTL’s testing of the Ancheer, the rider and instrumentation equal a total weight of 200 pounds, as is standard for EBTL's tests. The weather was 76 to 80 degrees F and the wind speed was near zero (early mornings are the best time to test).


Brake Testing

Brake testing is probably the most important factor, at least when it comes to safety. With the higher speeds that ebikes can achieve, braking becomes critical. And with the advent of ABS systems for ebikes, manufacturers are catching on to the importance of good brakes. This test appears very simple, achieve the desired speed, then simply stop as quickly as you can. For the Ancheer, this means pulling the front lever as hard as possible as it wouldn’t lock the front wheel, nor would it lift the rear wheel. The rear brake is engaged fully as well, which resulted in skidding. It takes practice to get it right! And every ebike rider should practice emergency stopping from top speed on different road conditions when and where they can safely do so.

The Ancheer stopped at an average distance of 33.2 feet from 20 mph. After each full stop, severe brake fade was noticed with the fifth and sixth stops requiring much longer distances as the front brake simply wasn’t applying as much pressure to the rotor. The first stop was completed in 30.9 feet and the last required 36.8 feet from 20 mph. Brake fade can happen to any brake as the friction surface becomes too hot to remain as effective as when cold. Better friction materials can prevent this. However, in real world use, it's unlikely that one would need to use the brakes repeatedly enough to notice brake fade except for perhaps, after braking going down a long hill.



Road Load Range Evaluation

For the road load range evaluation, the bike is simply pedaled with zero assist at 5, 10, 15, and 20 . The power required to move the bike at each speed is then determined and an equation is developed to represent that relationship. The Ancheer Mountain Bike results are below:

1566485862495.png



Once this is determined, one can calculate the power required to maintain the speed of each PAS setting:


PAS Setting
Max Assisted Speed
Wheel Power Required (watts)
Low
9.0
49.3
Medium
13.0
116.8
High
17.0
213.7


Ancheer Road Load vs. Speed

Once the power required is known, the range in miles for each PAS and rider input can be calculated, results for the Ancheer below assuming 100% of the battery is used:


PAS SettingRange (zero rider effort)Range (50 Watts Pedaling)Range (100 Watts Pedaling)Range (150 Watts Pedaling)
Low37.9
Medium16.039.2
High8.721.329.950.6



This road load range should differ from the real-world range as it assumes a constant steady state speed over level ground with no coasting. In real world usage, many variables can affect road load and range.

As an example of how to use the tables: a 200 pound rider who is contributing 100 watts of pedaling can expect to reach 29.9 miles at 17 mph while using maximum assist. To conserve battery life, one should discharge no lower than 20%, which would leave 80% of the battery capacity. In this instance, with only 80% of the battery capacity, the range in the above example would reduce by 20% to 23.9 miles.


Acceleration Test Results

The acceleration test is straight forward, how fast does it get from zero to the desired speed?

  • Max Speed Throttle Only: 17 mph (non-adjustable)
  • Zero to 5 mph Throttle Only: 2.7 seconds
  • Zero to 17 mph Throttle Only: 15.9 seconds
  • Max Assisted Speed: 17 mph (non-adjustable)
  • Zero to 17 mph with zero effort spinning: 16.2 seconds
  • Zero to 17 mph with moderate pedaling: 12.3 seconds

The Ancheer was slightly slower with zero effort pedaling vs. throttle only. I attribute this to the battery being slightly more discharged as the throttle only testing was completed first. You'll also note that the acceleration to 17 mph is recorded with moderate pedaling effort. The target for this is 150 watts of pedal power, and for this testing, the average was 145.1 watts.

As a comparison, a Faraday Cortland, which also claims a 250 watt geared hub motor achieved 20 mph in 12.5 seconds with 150 watts of pedaling, where the Ancheer achieved 17 mph in roughly the same amount of time.


Hill Climb Performance

For the Hill Climb Test, the Ancheer climbed 0.11 miles up the mile long Ice Pond hill using only the throttle before coming to a stop. It's average speed for this portion was 9.9 mph. Essentially, the ebike stopped as soon as the hill began to start.

For the 100 watts of pedaling portion, the assist was set to “High”. Only 0.27 miles of the hill were completed before more than 150 watts of pedal power was needed to continue climbing. Therefore, the test was stopped. The average speed was 6.2 mph with an average rider input of 101 watts. This was the first ebike tested that wouldn’t climb the complete hill with 100 watts of rider input. The Faraday Cortland tested previously, which also claims a 250 watt hub motor, climbed the entire hill with an average rider input of 104 watts with an average speed of 7.2 mph. These results would indicate that the Ancheer is putting down less power than the Faraday.

After coasting back down, the decision was made to simply pedal as much as necessary with the assist set to “High” to see how much rider power was needed to complete the mile long Ice Pond Hill. With an average rider input of 186 watts and a max of 430 watts, the Ancheer Mountain Bike completed the 1 mile hill climb in 6:55, with an average speed of 8.5 mph.

However, with only 10 feet or so left to the crest, the motor stopped assisting. Both the motor and controller housing were very hot. After allowing for the ebike to cool off, the motor would not apply power, or even make any noise, with throttle or pedal assist. After some diagnosis, it appears the motor controller had failed as there is no DC voltage going to the hall sensors. The motor tests okay with a digital multimeter but it too may be damaged. This report will be updated as more is learned about the failure.


Real-World Range Tests

Unfortunately, due to the breakdown of the ebike during the hill climb test, a real-world range test could not be completed.
 
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harryS

Well-Known Member
WIth your Faraday Cortland, unless I read it wrong, you did the Hill Climb test with 100W of pedaling with two riders. With the Ancheer you went up on throttle only and melted it. I suppose the Faraday has no throttle.

You slso report the hill climbe with your Metro, and I gather it went .71 mile on throttle only but also stopped, but survived.

Perhaps this is an overly destructive test for ebikes with small motors? What's the grade of the hill?
 
WIth your Faraday Cortland, unless I read it wrong, you did the Hill Climb test with 100W of pedaling with two riders. With the Ancheer you went up on throttle only and melted it. I suppose the Faraday has no throttle.

You slso report the hill climbe with your Metro, and I gather it went .71 mile on throttle only but also stopped, but survived.

Perhaps this is an overly destructive test for ebikes with small motors? What's the grade of the hill?
Correct, the Faraday does not have a throttle. Two different riders completed the test at different times, myself at 200 lbs and my daughter at 130 lbs, both weights include instrumentation. It climbed it both times using an average human input of 100 watts or so. The Ancheer did not reach the top with 100 watts of pedaling.

The Magnum Metro+ easily reached the top with 100 watts of human input with a 200 pound rider.

The Ancheer failed during my final attempt to climb the hill regardless of the human power input required. The decision was made to make this final attempt after it failed to make it using the throttle, and then failed again using 100 watts of human input.

And you are right, it is a severe hill! That’s the goal, I wanted a hill that would be severe enough to really test the bike’s power. I’ve climbed this hill on a regular bike so it’s not that extreme. I’ll post the grade profile when I get a chance.

One other note, the average Ancheer buyer isn’t going to know that it can easily overheat and fail during a long climb. I knew it was risky, but there’s no warning in the small instruction manual that comes with the ebike.
 

jim6b

Active Member
The percent grade of the hill would be helpful for comparison purposes.

Is it on "map my ride", for example.
 
Unfortunately, I can’t get the grade to come up with my phone and I’ll be without internet and WiFi for the next 8 days (camping in upstate NY). I can look it up when I get back.

In the meantime, if someone wants to look it up: the hill climb starts at the American Legion on Ice Pond Road in Brewster, NY. The address there is 121 Ice Pond, I believe. The hill peaks and the test ends at 227 Ice Pond Road.

Google maps states it is a climb of 315 feet over the mile. This comes out to just under 6%. However, there is a small downhill portion after an initial climb.

When I return, I’ll ride it with my 20 Hz GPS and post the elevation data.

For reference, this area of the country (lower Hudson Valley) has several hills much longer and steeper than this one!
 

john peck

Well-Known Member
My CCS obviously will climb much further, , but below 10 mph it's just a 66 pd. pedal bike. I think that's
true tor a lot of ebikes on a steep grade
 
Strava also has the grade%. It's what climbers are used to. Why not post it??
I just looked at the app and it doesn't have grade%. So, I logged into through my laptop and I only see a chart that shows the grade percent where the cursor is located. Now, I don't have Summit, perhaps that's the issue. If so, I'll just pay for summit so I have this information in the future. Here's the chart that I see with the cursor showing the grade%:

1568283788719.png


Let me know if Summit gives you a grade vs. distance chart. Thanks!
 

Brooks

Member
Thanks for that. I didn't realize you were just using phone. I know hub drives are not good climbers, so I guess this eMTB is a trail/path bike.
 
Thanks for that. I didn't realize you were just using phone. I know hub drives are not good climbers, so I guess this eMTB is a trail/path bike.
The Strava data is coming from a Garmin 530. I did ride up the same hill this morning with the 20 Hz VBox unit but the elevation data isn't great due to the trees that cover the road and reduce the number of satellites that the VBox is pulling from. I'll try it again in a few months once the leaves drop.

Meanwhile, I did find this route planner with a gradient chart: https://us.mapometer.com/cycling#

The chart is below and the hill maxes out at 16.5% grade.

1568383874960.png
 

Mike's E-Bikes

Well-Known Member
Thanks for that. I didn't realize you were just using phone. I know hub drives are not good climbers, so I guess this eMTB is a trail/path bike.
Hub drives are great climbers. You just need to buy a quality ebike with a hub drive motor with a decent torque rating. Ancheer is not a quality ebike, as the tester clearly revealed when he said 'not surprisingly the Anchor failed.' As he also mentioned his Magnum metro ,which is a hub drive, had no issue with that hill. An Aventon Pace 500, at only $1399 would make that hill easy. Most people that ride the Pace and that have done side by side comparisons with the Metro, said they felt the Pace accelerated faster and was more powerful.

These generalizations about hub drives are getting absurd. Total ignorance.
 

Brooks

Member
Oh, it's Mike's E-Bikes again. Thanks for squaring me away, Mikey. You forgot to add how much better the Yamahas are for any ebike riding. Total A-Hole.