Any idea what battery pack i need?

Rocketbox

New Member
I recently purchased an ebike (a 2009 kilowattbikes cruiser) without the battery pack. The overall dimensions of the battery area are 17" long X 5.25" wide X 2.25" tall. Ive attached images of the connection, a 2 prong connector as pictured. Im trying to determine the battery i could order that would just plug and play... any ideas?
 

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indianajo

Well-Known Member
You possibly could buy a new battery from kilowatt the OEM. You could also set fire to a half dozen portraits of Franklin and watch them burn, probably be more fun.
I suggest you cut that garbage connector off. Then crimp on Dorman .157" bullett connectors from the auto supply. Put a male on the minus and a female on the plus so you can't install your new battery backwards. Use a klein or ideal crimp tool and pull test after crimping to test your work. Any extension wire required use 12 ga wire, red & black, and peel back a few strands so they will fit in the connector made for 14-16 ga. Cut the extra strands off flush with diagonal cutters so they won't short against anything. You can probably get decent cutters in the fishing dept. of a discount store. HD & Lowes have some good tools. DON'T buy any imitation tools from Harbor Freight. Don't buy bullett connectors from ebay alibaba etc, they will melt at 30 amps.
Then install a luna dolphin battery, clipping it to the frame with brackets made out of sheet metal. For example metal cut out of a box fan shell with tin snips. Screw tight with 10-32x1 1/2" SS screws from mcmaster.com. Use elastic stop nuts so they don't fall off. Use safety glasses with power tools. Use kevlar or leather top grain gloves when working sheet metal.
TJ says california ebikes has good batteries but I haven't used them.
The luna battery comes with an XT90 connector, with a pigtail. crimp onto the pigtail. I tried soldering to XT90 I bought from e-bay but couldn't make it work with only a 130 W soldering gun. If it got hot enough for the solder to stick the pins melted out of the block and wouldn't line up anymore. So use Luna's factory soldered XT90 and don't mess with it.
If you can't determine which wire is plus and which minus, follow them into the controller where inside on the board it should be labeled. You may have to unscrew the shell from the heatsink and slide it off to see the labeling on the board. The controller should say inside if it is a 36 v or 48 v controller. Match the battery to it. AH is up to you, the more AH the farther you can go on a charge.
 
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Rocketbox

New Member
You possibly could buy a new battery from kilowatt the OEM. You could also set fire to a half dozen portraits of Franklin and watch them burn, probably be more fun.
I suggest you cut that garbage connector off. Then crimp on Dorman .157" bullett connectors from the auto supply. Put a male on the minus and a female on the plus so you can't install your new battery backwards. Use a klein or ideal crimp tool and pull test after crimping to test your work. Any extension wire required use 12 ga wire, red & black, and peel back a few strands so they will fit in the connector made for 14-16 ga. Cut the extra strands off flush with diagonal cutters so they won't short against anything. You can probably get decent cutters in the fishing dept. of a discount store. HD & Lowes have some good tools. DON'T buy any imitation tools from Harbor Freight. Don't buy bullett connectors from ebay alibaba etc, they will melt at 30 amps.
Then install a luna dolphin battery, clipping it to the frame with brackets made out of sheet metal. For example metal cut out of a box fan shell with tin snips. Screw tight with 10-32x1 1/2" SS screws from mcmaster.com. Use elastic stop nuts so they don't fall off. Use safety glasses with power tools. Use kevlar or leather top grain gloves when working sheet metal.
TJ says california ebikes has good batteries but I haven't used them.
The luna battery comes with an XT90 connector, with a pigtail. crimp onto the pigtail. I tried soldering to XT90 I bought from e-bay but couldn't make it work with only a 130 W soldering gun. If it got hot enough for the solder to stick the pins melted out of the block and wouldn't line up anymore. So use Luna's factory soldered XT90 and don't mess with it.
If you can't determine which wire is plus and which minus, follow them into the controller where inside on the board it should be labeled. You may have to unscrew the shell from the heatsink and slide it off to see the labeling on the board. The controller should say inside if it is a 36 v or 48 v controller. Match the battery to it. AH is up to you, the more AH the farther you can go on a charge.
Wow.... thanks for the info!
Alot of the batteries i see are 48v. If i get a higher voltage than the motor was designed for, will i fry the motor?... or what is the side effect of installing a battery that delivers too much juice?
 

indianajo

Well-Known Member
you've got to match the voltage of your controller. It should say the voltage inside on the PCB, or If not the capacitors on the board will have a maximum voltage. 35v is probably a 24 v controller, 50 v capacitors is probably 36 v controller, 63 volt capacitors minimum for a 48 v controller. Capacitors look like little oil tanks with a minus stripe on one side of the plastic wrap.
For $189 I got a whole DD hub motor in wheel, controller, throttle, brake handles with switches, connector blocks. I wouldn't spend more than that, just throw away the stuff on the bike already. Batteries are not cheap, I got two duds for $320 from ebay & amazon, use Luna, ebikeling, or maybe californiaebike among US banked suppliers. Sending your debit card # to asia is IMHO, risky.
 

Rocketbox

New Member
you've got to match the voltage of your controller. It should say the voltage inside on the PCB, or If not the capacitors on the board will have a maximum voltage. 35v is probably a 24 v controller, 50 v capacitors is probably 36 v controller, 63 volt capacitors minimum for a 48 v controller. Capacitors look like little oil tanks with a minus stripe on one side of the plastic wrap.
For $189 I got a whole DD hub motor in wheel, controller, throttle, brake handles with switches, connector blocks. I wouldn't spend more than that, just throw away the stuff on the bike already. Batteries are not cheap, I got two duds for $320 from ebay & amazon, use Luna, ebikeling, or maybe californiaebike among US banked suppliers. Sending your debit card # to asia is IMHO, risky.
Good to know! Sounds like i need to pop the cover off the controller box and see what voltage it is. It seems like i could just buy a shark battery, then wire in the battery connections to the contacts on the controller or even just figure out which post is potitive and negative and connect the battery to the posts.
 

Rocketbox

New Member
Good to know! Sounds like i need to pop the cover off the controller box and see what voltage it is. It seems like i could just buy a shark battery, then wire in the battery connections to the contacts on the controller or even just figure out which post is potitive and negative and connect the battery to the posts.
It looks like the capacitors in the controller box are 25v, so i need a 24v battery, eh?

The controller box is an Ananda 2414DLL-3LAU00.

The battery connecting posts can be pretty easily bypassed it looks like.
 

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harryS

Well-Known Member
Based on the 24 sticker, I would guess it's 24V, and I see the 25V rating on the smaller capacitor. What about the bigger ones? I would think 25V is too low for a 24V lithium pack, which is going to come in either at 25.2V if they stack six cells in series.