Are Haibikes huge?

Hugh Caldwell

New Member
I'm thinking of purchasing an SDURO Cros or Trekking. The local bike shops no longer carry Haibke so I test rode a Trek DS+ and Conduit+ both 17.5" . Looking at the Trek site these are listed as Medium frames but checking the dimensions to the Haibike it seems to match up closest with the SDURO Extra Small frame. Is this correct? IOW I'm 5'8" with a 29" inseam which SDURO frame size would be best?

thanks,
Hugh
 

Aelx

New Member
I'm thinking of purchasing an SDURO Cros or Trekking. The local bike shops no longer carry Haibke so I test rode a Trek DS+ and Conduit+ both 17.5" . Looking at the Trek site these are listed as Medium frames but checking the dimensions to the Haibike it seems to match up closest with the SDURO Extra Small frame. Is this correct? IOW I'm 5'8" with a 29" inseam which SDURO frame size would be best?

thanks,
Hugh
You will need the 40 or 44 cm frame. I got 40 and I am 5'8" and I feel it's right on the edge. I prefer a shorter, upright position so for me it works out but if you prefer more stretched out go for 44.
 

JayVee

Well-Known Member
Be very careful with the Trekking series frames because, yes, they are rather big. I'm 6ft1 and had the choice between the S and the M for the Trekking Sduro 6.0. The differences were very subtle and I finally opted for the S frame size (52cm/20") after trying both because the lower standover height was much more comfortable in traffic. The S is already a big frame. It's the first time in my life that I have a frame smaller than a size L. But it's the geometry that counts and Haibike's naming scheme is fairly misleading.

I took a look at the frame sizes for the Sduro Cross Trekking and the geometry seems to be exactly the same as for the regular Trekking series. With your inseam of 29 inches (73cms) you might not be comfortable on the S frame because it has a TT that's 79 cms. On Haibike's geometry chart that corresponds to the vertical M measurement. So your suspicion that the XS might be the correct frame size isn't so far fetched.
 

pxpaulx

Well-Known Member
Ahhh... you guys are talking about women's frames. Now I get it. :)
Haibike has like 2 women's bikes that are in lighter colors. Low step bikes aren't really called women's bikes anymore. And with haibike their low steps are barely different anyway from a visual perspective.
 

Hugh Caldwell

New Member
Thanks for all the replies. This is where I'm getting the dimensions for the SDuro Cross: http://www.haibike.com/en-US/US/bikes/344/2017-sduro-cross-4-0?variant=3848109740#geometry
and the Trek: https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/bikes/hybrid-bikes/electric-bikes/conduit/conduit/p/1329000-2017/

According to Haibike the XS Low step has a stand over height of 73cm, the medium is 72cm, and the XL is 71cm. Something isn't right!
http://www.haibike.com/en-US/US/bikes/344/2017-sduro-cross-4-0?variant=3848109740#geometry

I found another bike shop not too far away with an xduro trekking so I should be able to get this figured out.

Thanks again,
Hugh
 

JayVee

Well-Known Member
Haibike has like 2 women's bikes that are in lighter colors. Low step bikes aren't really called women's bikes anymore. And with haibike their low steps are barely different anyway from a visual perspective.
Not trying to diss them, just trying to understand what people are talking about. :) Because I had the same dilemma as the OP. Those frame sizes are mighty confusing...

I would pay close attention to the wheelbase of the low-step model. Because if the rider's feet are big, and he has certain pedaling habits, he might hit the panniers when riding. I lent my bike to a friend who has this problem. He's 6ft versus my 6ft1. He wears a shoe size 11.5 whereas I wear a size 8. After trying mine, he bought the same bike, but 2 sizes bigger. By observing him ride, we noticed that he pedals on the tips of his toes, whereas I have a more 'balanced' position over the pedal. So in the end he got the L frame which is really big, but he prefers the more aerodynamic position on the bike and it gives him room for his feet. The size S frame gives me a more upright riding position, and I get pretty bad 'fuel mileage' on windy days... However, the S frame is much easier to manage in traffic, so from my perspective I made the right choice as I live in an urban area.
 

Jaladhi

New Member
As @pxpaulx said, Haibike low step bikes are not that visually different. If it helps, I am 29" inseam as well and the low step 44cm Trekking fits me fine. It is the XDuro Trekking S RX but I'd think the frame is similar between XDuro and SDuro.

Thanks for all the replies. This is where I'm getting the dimensions for the SDuro Cross: http://www.haibike.com/en-US/US/bikes/344/2017-sduro-cross-4-0?variant=3848109740#geometry
and the Trek: https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/bikes/hybrid-bikes/electric-bikes/conduit/conduit/p/1329000-2017/

According to Haibike the XS Low step has a stand over height of 73cm, the medium is 72cm, and the XL is 71cm. Something isn't right!
http://www.haibike.com/en-US/US/bikes/344/2017-sduro-cross-4-0?variant=3848109740#geometry

I found another bike shop not too far away with an xduro trekking so I should be able to get this figured out.

Thanks again,
Hugh
 

Hugh Caldwell

New Member
I test rode a Trekking 56cm and yes Haibikes are huge at least compared to the Trek bikes. I think I could get away with the 52cm but will probably order a 48cm. I'm a bit worried about ordering a too small bike. My last bike was a 49cm Lemond Tourmalet and even though I bough it at a bike shop and was supposedly sized for me it always felt too small.

Thanks,
Hugh
 

vincent

Well-Known Member
dont know about the trekking bikes but if you look at the sduro vs xduro on the spec sheets a lot of times they are different

i have had a hard time finding a small enough yamaha or bulls with brose to fit me, wanted full suspension but am not going to be able to get one because the hard tail standover heights are shorter
 

JayVee

Well-Known Member
I test rode a Trekking 56cm and yes Haibikes are huge at least compared to the Trek bikes. I think I could get away with the 52cm but will probably order a 48cm. I'm a bit worried about ordering a too small bike. My last bike was a 49cm Lemond Tourmalet and even though I bough it at a bike shop and was supposedly sized for me it always felt too small.

Thanks,
Hugh
If you need me to make any real world measurements, just let me know (I have an Sduro Trekking 52 as stated before).

I tried both the 52 and 56. There is very little difference between these 2 sizes:
  • Top tube is 15mm shorter on the size S frame than the M (600mm versus 615mm).
  • The standover height for the S is 790mm versus 810mm for the M.
  • The S frame is 520 mm (~20”) versus the M which is 560mm (~22 inches). As you can straddle the bike with both sizes, it makes no difference.
  • The wheelbase is longer on the M, which might help with pannier problems if you have big feet or wear boots often.
  • The head tube is exactly the same length on all frame sizes.
It should be noted that the standover height is more of an educated guess than a fixed number. The top tube is diagonal and measures ~73cms at its lowest point (for the S frame). If you're on the skinny side the effective standover height will be about 79cms, but if you're on the heavier side the number will probably be bigger.

Based on what you've told us, I think your choice to go with the XS (48 in high step) is the correct one. Just forget about the silly XS tag. Haibike would be well inspired to leave out the XS, S, M, & L frame size tags. As you've correctly pointed out, these denominations just confuse people.

Enjoy your e-bike and let us know how it goes. :)
 

Hugh Caldwell

New Member
Thanks again for all the advice and offers of help. My Cross SM should be arriving tomorrow :D. It's supposed to rain for the next two days :( .

Nice guitar Athena!
 
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ath3na

New Member
Thanks again for all the advice and offers of help. My Cross SM should be arriving tomorrow :D. It's supposed to rain for the next two days :( .

Nice guitar Athena!
Thanks Hugh! You must post some pics when your bike gets here. I looked at the Cross at first.

We have rain here too now. I'm targeting a local small street market this Saturday for a ride. Chance of rain, but maybe that will keep some of the tourists away. It's the kind of thing where I can hopefully keep the bike with me, as I have no bags yet to carry a lock(s). I could probably wrap the heavy chain I have around the frame somewhere, but the thing is pretty heavy to begin with. Not to keen on adding a more weight to it right away.
 

Hugh Caldwell

New Member
My Cross showed up a few hours ago. Just put it together and rode around the neighborhood and to the corner store.

Seems pretty awesome so far. Though my forward chain guide does hit the chain. I'll have to look into that.

I like that the manuals came in a pouch to keep all the paperwork together. I was surprised that there weren't any assembly instructions. Not that there needed but I've just come to expect them.

The charger is huge (must be a haibike thing :D) .

I'm really looking forward to putting it through its paces this weekend.

My two Yamahas:
WP_20170512_13_01_37_Pro.jpg



WP_20170512_13_00_04_Pro.jpg
 

ath3na

New Member
Sweet Hugh! I'd have gone for the Cross if my roads weren't so torn up around here. Is the size ok for you?

I don't have any other batteries of this type that are this large, so I wasn't all that surprised at the size of the charger. It charged my battery from near death in a few hours, didn't heat up, didn't smell, etc. so I was happy. I'm not paranoid - but I don't particularly want to be forced to leave it charging overnight. My brother's apt burned down after leaving some (cheap) Li-On batteries he bought charging overnight. So I'm happy for the typically teutonically over-engineered charger and charge mine in the kitchen (not between me and the front door) just in case. ;->
 

Hugh Caldwell

New Member
The 48cm size is about perfect.

The size of the charger is really a non issue for me and probably 99% of riders but if someone wanted to go touring and take their charger with them the size could be an issue.
 

ath3na

New Member
I have to admit I tried to lower my seat just a little and bottomed out. Rummaging through my closet I ran across an old short carbon fiber seat post I had with an old Azonic Love Seat on it (hey it seemed cool at the time) and couldn't resist throwing it on. I'd like to see if the pedal assist makes up for a little less than efficient pedaling position. I used to be really anal-retentive about this when climbing (though almost always ended up out of the saddle on any decent hill)... but liked to lower it to cruise through Cologne on my almost downhill-ish bike with dual-crown forks. I had never heard of "urban downhill" in 2003 so it was something new and exciting. And I was in a LOT better shape. ;-> The Love Seat actually feels harder than the stock seat, so I'll probably swap it back, when I get a chance. Maybe it's age, maybe it's my butt hitting it too many times...LOL.

Anyway, I haven't had the bike out again yet, but did ride it around the storage room...LOL. And it was nice to get more of both toes on the ground. Guess my 30" inseam has shrunk a little with age. ;->