Aventon Pace 500: very nice e-bike and at a great price point ...

Mike's E-Bikes

Well-Known Member
The review by Pete at Electric Bike Report on this Aventon Pace 500 illustrates a pretty nice e-bike can be built and sold for $1400.
https://electricbikereport.com/aventon-pace-500-electric-bike-review-part-2-ride-range-test-video/

Its truly an 'entry level' price point, but with mid level features that are often lacking on ebikes in this lower price range.

Such as these highlights that caught my eye at this price level:

+ 500 Watt WITH 48 Volts - Usually at this price point you are lucky to get a 350 watt and at only 36 Volts, and more frequently 250 watts
+ 27.5 Rims with E-Bike Rated Tires 2.2" thick - many ebike riders seem to want the wider tires which provides nice footprint for fine gravel trails, and also a somewhat smoother ride. Kenda's are decent quality tires. Whereas many ebikes at this price point may usually have 26" tires x 1.75" thickness, and definitely not ebike rated or nicer Kenda tires.
+ Nice LCD - The displays on ebikes priced below $1500, usually are LED with no speed, and very little other data, with led dots to show a rough indication of battery level. Or they are the kit like display LCD, that just look cheap. The display on the Aventon has nice large read out, and all the basic parameters you'd want.
+ Shimano Altus Derailleur - far too often you will see entry level Tourney derailler. The Altus was originally designed for MTB's, and has proven durable over time.
+ 48 Volt 11 AH battery - this is a decent size, for what this ebike represents. Under rigorous conditions, high speeds, 2000 feet of elevation change, mostly level 5 and 190 lb rider, Pete got 27 miles. That's not too shabby. Probably a lighter rider, in flatter areas, staying on level 1 or 2, with decent physical conditioning could do between 40 and 50 miles. Remember on an ebike, if you go slower, (less than 15 mph), you will get longer range because wind resistance is not linear, and increases quite a bit in terms of needed force once speeds start going above 15 mph.
+ 28 MPH, Class 3 - Class 3 at this price point is pretty much unheard of.
+ Sinewave, Brushless Hub Motor - there is a better write up at their website, but generally speaking this is a more reliable design and with higher torque than the typical geared hub motor at this wattage level and voltage.
+ Samsung Battery - brand name with A grade cells is good. Not typical for entry level price points below $1500
+ Comfortable seat, swept back handle bars, coupled with adjustable stem. Usually you don't see this combination of components at this price point, and more around the price of $1800, so its a flexible design for many sized riders
+ Multiple geometries and frame sizes - usually its one size fits 'many', but they offer 3 men's sizes, and 2 step through sizes. Likely to get a better fit for your height with this combination, than relying on the 'one size fits many' approach many smaller ebike firms take.
+ Thumb throttle - we take this for granted, but I have seen so many ebikes without them. Its a $5 item, if the controller is set up for it. Just put it on ! (let consumer take it off if they wish)
+ Flat Foot Geometry (aka Pedal Forward Design) - these designs are not that common, especially on ebikes, but the geometry allows one to get better leg extension while also being able to keep your 'feet flat on the ground' while seated. With most bikes, the pedals are more directly below your seat, so to get the proper extension for pedaling, you'll likely end up only being able to 'tippy toe' or touch the ground with one foot while seated. us older folks sometimes appreciate the added stability or ease of getting on and off our ebikes. Usually the choice for a flat foot design was limited to the $2400 Electra Townie, or less common Fuji, with a weak motor, class 1 only. Or the Schwinn Constance, which has a mid drive and is priced also around $2400. Even if you don't want or need that pedal forward configuration, it does result in really nice all around 'cruiser feel', without looking too much like a 'beachy' bike.
+Frame integrated battery - they did a nice job, and it keeps the weight balanced where its placed, especially given you have a rear hub motor
+ Weight of 50 lbs. - this is not real heavy, but many designs at these price points clock in around 55 to 60 lbs, and often you have to pay a lot more money to get one that weighs around 43 lbs. - they've used hydroforming on their alumimum, and even cleaned up welds pretty nicely. I've seen weld points that look atrocious on $3000 to $4000 ebikes.

In general, many people (consumers and producers) seem to focus too much on the wattage and battery level, whereas Aventon has taken the approach of getting a lot of little things right, designing a fairly approachable ebike, with step through and step over designs that both men and women alike should find attractive with plenty of power for most situations, and speeds where you aren't going to hit the proverbial "20 mph wall" of the traditional Class 1 ebike. Many customers express that they'd just not like to be capped by that 'wall', and are not necessarily needing to scream around at 25 to 28 mph. I get the 'laws' and all of that, but I can tell you that more than 60% of the buyers would like an ebike assist that is not 'capped' at 20 mph, even if they mostly stay below that mph. The larger tires both in diameter and thickness, certainly help provide better assurance in on or modest off road conditions. Rather than shocks, these tires will help, but you can actually get very nice suspension seats that do a better job than front shocks, for your whole body. Often shocks on ebikes at price points below $2000, are very entry level, and are only effective for very rough situations, while robbing you and the battery of range when you are facing more hills.

All of the above for $1399 ! (you know - finally, a decent one not at the level of unobtanium)

That's impressive (to me at least), and it seems to be a very capable all around ebike, at a price that doesn't 'break the bank' and hopefully should allow many more people who have been reluctant to get into e-biking, feeling they have to spend over $2000 or $3000 to get a 'good one' with the performance they think they'll need, or people finding too few choices at this price point.

I felt compelled to bring more awareness to this brand, merely because it fits with my own philosophy that the industry SHOULD be able to both build, and sell a very good quality ebike at price points much lower than we all have been used to seeing. (i.e. this understating it, but THERE IS NO LACK of models and brands priced between $3000 and $6000, which seems like its over doing it for the disposable income levels of the average American, who are likely not buying an ebike for commuting purposes. More often its recreational, or health related, and for fun. Using ebikes (and of course regular bikes) for commuting is far more common in Europe and other countries where ebikes have been more popular and around for far longer than here in the US, and greater percentages of their populations just ride bikes for so many more purposes than we do here. In those situations, its likely easier to justify the expense of a $3000 to $6000 ebike, especially when its often those folks don't have a car. ) I get that if you have the means, then what you spend is your business, and I have no complaint. But there is a lot of the US population, where spending anything close to $1500 is a very hard thing, and yet they probably could really use the health benefit and regular exercise and motivational aspects of
an ebike, where now they have a regular bike, but just dont want to ride because its 'too hard' or they get 'tired too quickly' or dont ride fast enough to keep up with a spouse who is capable of riding regularly and in great physical shape. Some people want to get there (great physical shape), so an ebike allows them to get that 'start' and build up over time.

Again, this is just my own perspective, and I am not looking to start any arguments or debates, that far too often occur here on this forum.

If you already knew about the Aventon Pace, feel free to just ignore the thread.
 
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Mike's E-Bikes

Well-Known Member
Ok. What's missing on the Aventon ?

The obvious:
+ No integrated lights
+ No rear rack
+ No fenders

Here is my opinion as a buyer:
+ you can get better quality racks, and designs that fit your preferred carry bag better, than most ebike OEM's will put on their ebikes. A rack is like a purse, and can be a very personal choice, where many people have very different needs. Some people like to carry a lot of stuff. Some people do not. Why pay for a rear rack if you dont need it or want it ? Same goes for a front basket.
+ Fenders - yeah, you probably want those, but again, there are a lot of fenders out there, and unfortunately the fenders I have seen on ebikes priced below $2000, have been a pain in the rear to deal with to adjust after unboxing, often come damaged, and usually are the cheapest you can put on an ebike. Some people also like the looks of bikes without fenders. Some people simply cannot go without fenders. Some like looks of full wrap around, some want only partial. Again, personal choice, with many different needs, or styles desired.
+ Integrated Lights - this is a topic full of debate. The truth is, you can get far brighter lights, in plenty of configurations, and operate on re-chargeable li-ion batteries, which will also not take away from your integrated battery range. Yes, its convenient to have them integrated and not have to worry about turning each one on every time. But not everyone rides at night, or cares about the lights during the day. The debates can go both ways. Its a very personal topic, or some people just don't really care.

I think its a situation where Aventon put the money where it was needed, and where its not convenient for the consumer to address, but in the case of each of the above options, THEY ARE readily available on the market with more choices than any single EBike oem is willing to carry, so its an opportunity to 'customize' your ebike to what you really like.

P.S. Rack Time, and Ibera make some really nice rear racks, and compatible rear bags and panniers that are quick release, and secure. They also look nice, and prices are very reasonable. Topeak is another nice brand for racks. Just a few of many.
 

NWMI

New Member
Mike,

Thank you so much for your comments above, which combined with the reviews, are very helpful.

I am shopping for e-bikes for my wife and I and everything that I read about this bike sounds really good.

I am sold on e-bikes but I was having a really hard, OK, impossible time justifying $ 6K for a pair of e-bikes, especially living in northern US where we can only use them part of the year, but at least on paper, this bike sounds like what we are looking for.

However, I am a complete newbie so I need some help outfitting these with racks, fenders, and lights and what website to find these on. I don't know where to start.

You mention some rack manufacturers above which is great.

I know that it is personal preference, but could you please suggest a specific rack, fenders, and lights that would work well on this bike and where to order them, so I would at least have a turn-key starting point?

Also, with the display being non-removable, what do I do if it starts to rain on my ride or I want to stop for a bite and leave my bike (locked up of course)?

Again, thank you so much!
 
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DavidinFL

New Member
I purchased two Pace 500's for my wife and I and can attest, they are awesome! Our first ebikes as well, really fun and quality components. We have people stopping us all the time, everyone really likes my wife's, it's the small frame Sand color....does look like a higher end bike.
Anyways....I just ordered the fenders from Aventon's accessory section but be warned, they do not fit nicely without modifications. I had to get longer screws for the front fender, as well as bend the metal mounting bracket so it fits proper.
I got this rack from Amazon and it fits perfect: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002T5H8MW/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o06_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
 

NWMI

New Member
David,

Thank you so much for the info. It's great to hear that you are liking the bikes. Currently they are at the top of my list. One question on the rack: it says "for non-disc brake mount" but the Pace has disc brakes. Does this just mean that it is not mounted on the disc brakes?

Mike,

Everything on the Pace 500 looks great and you seem really knowledgeable, so I am hoping that you can help me out.

My wife and I are in our early 60's, looking for comfy, upright position, paved-trail cruisers. The Pace 500 seems to fit the bill. I can either tackle assembly myself or drive several hours to a bike shop that sells them assembled. All good.

My LBS has a used 1 year (as rental) Fuji e-Traverse with 5 year warranty for $ 1,875.

But the Pace has double the watts, a bigger battery, is Class 3, and is the upright comfort type bike that I am looking for while the eTraverse seems more forward.

But given that the e-Traverse is a $ 2,800 bike new, does it provide anything that the Pace does not? I am not seeing it.

And what e-bike would be the next step up from the Pace for what I am looking for and would it provide any value for the additional $?

I suspect that the Pace may be perfect. What do you say?
 
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DavidinFL

New Member
Sure, no problem. Yes, that is the correct rack (it does include fittings to move the rack out by a 1/2", but it's not needed on the Pace 500 as the mounting points on the bottom bracket are not close to the disk caliper)
Just another note - it took about 45 mins per bike to put these together and I was able to do it by myself. Nothing really complex but they are heavy and I used the box like they show in the assembly video but did struggle some due to the weight. If you're not mechanically savvy, there are mobile bicycle repair services available that can do the assembly for you. Just google that for your area
 

Mike's E-Bikes

Well-Known Member
David,

Thank you so much for the info. It's great to hear that you are liking the bikes. Currently they are at the top of my list. One question on the rack: it says "for non-disc brake mount" but the Pace has disc brakes. Does this just mean that it is not mounted on the disc brakes?

Mike,

Everything on the Pace 500 looks great and you seem really knowledgeable, so I am hoping that you can help me out.

My wife and I are in our early 60's, looking for comfy, upright position, paved-trail cruisers. The Pace 500 seems to fit the bill. I can either tackle assembly myself or drive several hours to a bike shop that sells them assembled. All good.

My LBS has a used 1 year (as rental) Fuji e-Traverse with 5 year warranty for $ 1,875.

But the Pace has double the watts, a bigger battery, is Class 3, and is the upright comfort type bike that I am looking for while the eTraverse seems more forward.

But given that the e-Traverse is a $ 2,800 bike new, does it provide anything that the Pace does not? I am not seeing it.

And what e-bike would be the next step up from the Pace for what I am looking for and would it provide any value for the additional $?

I suspect that the Pace may be perfect. What do you say?
Well the Fuji has a mid drive, so that is really where the biggest added cost to the bike comes in. This too is a much more expensive motor to service. The motor doesn't offer more power or torque than the Aventon, and Bosch has no throttle and will limit top speed to 20 mph. That limit can be found to be frustrating to people who are wanting to get a little more assist to reach 21 or 22 mph, and feels like hitting a wall. Many say assist tapers before reaching 20 on some Bosch driven bikes.

Tires are only 38c, so much thinner than Kendas on Aventon. Probably result in a stiffer or harsher ride where you would feel more bumps. Many riders prefer stability of the 2" plus tires on the Aventon especially if you ever ride on gravel or off road trails.

You'd have to ride both bikes side by side to get an appreciation for the differences. Some people prefer the feel of how the motor responds to your pedaling on the Bosch mid drive vs a hub drive. You'd have to decide for yourself if that's worth any premium. If so how much.
Court in his review expressed the Fuji was priced high for what the bike offered. Before they closed down, Performance always had their Fujis heavily discounted whenever I went to their local store. This was for about 2 years.

The next ebike that would have more to offer for the money, and priced higher than $1399, would be the Surface 604 Rook or Colt. Those are $1799. Others between those 2 prices fall short in other areas. And you'd really need to get above $3000 to notice significant differences or unique benefits you might want in another ebike. Others may have differing opinions on that, but it's semantics and very subtle rider preferences that can make people jump up and down and scream, that model "x" of brand "y" is so "much better" than brand "z" .

I'd challenge everyone of those opinions to put their preferred ebike side by side, and demonstrate in person which particular component is worth x more versus the Aventon, and the exact benefit that is worth that amount of money to them. 99 times out of 100 you would find that it comes down to rider preferences. And the weight or importance that preference means to them and how much they are willing to pay extra for that preference (an entirely subjective opinion) Or set of preferences. Sounds like to me you've already found the ebike that satisfies your preferences. So go for it. It's all about what is the perfect ebike for YOU. No one else will be riding YOUR ebike. ;)
 

NWMI

New Member
Mike, thank you so much. You are an absolute wealth of information and your posts on this thread and others have been extremely helpful to me as I try to sort out what to a newbie, is an overwhelming amount of information and choices.

There would have to be an absolute world of difference for me to spend $ 6K vs $ 2.8K for a pair of bikes and for my preferences, I am not seeing that difference.

You are obviously extremely well informed and therefore correct about everything above including that "I have found the ebike that satisfies my preferences, so go for it" and I am! Thanks again! :)

P.S. Fenders: For the Pace 500, do you recommend the Portland Design Works fenders on the Aventon website or something else and if so what?
 
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Bigal1463

New Member
David,

Thank you so much for the info. It's great to hear that you are liking the bikes. Currently they are at the top of my list. One question on the rack: it says "for non-disc brake mount" but the Pace has disc brakes. Does this just mean that it is not mounted on the disc brakes?

Mike,

Everything on the Pace 500 looks great and you seem really knowledgeable, so I am hoping that you can help me out.

My wife and I are in our early 60's, looking for comfy, upright position, paved-trail cruisers. The Pace 500 seems to fit the bill. I can either tackle assembly myself or drive several hours to a bike shop that sells them assembled. All good.

My LBS has a used 1 year (as rental) Fuji e-Traverse with 5 year warranty for $ 1,875.

But the Pace has double the watts, a bigger battery, is Class 3, and is the upright comfort type bike that I am looking for while the eTraverse seems more forward.

But given that the e-Traverse is a $ 2,800 bike new, does it provide anything that the Pace does not? I am not seeing it.

And what e-bike would be the next step up from the Pace for what I am looking for and would it provide any value for the additional $?

I suspect that the Pace may be perfect. What do you say?
 

Bigal1463

New Member
Hi Mike, I have the Aventon Pace 500 and have about 500 miles on it. It's a very comfortable bike, sturdy and extremely fast. There's a lot of bike here for the money, and I did add a suspension seat post and it does smooth out the ride.