Battery storage...never been used battery.

Ryan71

Member
I have two lithium ion battery packs for my 2019 radrover. The original battery was replaced due to poor range but works for short runs around town. I currently have my replacement battery stored at around 50%. I've decided after much helpful feedback from forum members to go with the 80% charge method. My question is should I be using both batteries to prevent damage or will the new battery that remains unused be ok stored at 30/50% until I need it witch could be several months to years?
 

Browneye

Active Member
Curious too if we have any battery experts with recommendations.
All of my expertise is on lithium-polymer cells for RC cars - they are MUCH more volatile and sensitive to charge rate and state. They can catch on fire if not properly maintained, or capacity just disappears.

The common theme for maintaining performance for either seems to be max charge to 90-95%, and to not discharge below 20-25%, and storage at 50-60%, 1-C charge rate.

The problem as I see it is that our chargers aren't nearly as sophisticated compared to Lipo ones, so there isn't an easy setting on them to do this. The good news is the really low charge-rate for these bike chargers tends to balance them at the same time. And Li-ion may well be different than Li-po.

For most Li-ion appliances the batts are kept fully charged at all times. [shrug]

Self-discharge rate for both types seems to be very low, as compared to lead-acid batts for example.

The battery sellers recommend storing them fully charged, but that may simply be just due to the simple chargers offered.
 

Ryan71

Member
Curious too if we have any battery experts with recommendations.
All of my expertise is on lithium-polymer cells for RC cars - they are MUCH more volatile and sensitive to charge rate and state. They can catch on fire if not properly maintained, or capacity just disappears.

The common theme for maintaining performance for either seems to be max charge to 90-95%, and to not discharge below 20-25%, and storage at 50-60%, 1-C charge rate.

The problem as I see it is that our chargers aren't nearly as sophisticated compared to Lipo ones, so there isn't an easy setting on them to do this. The good news is the really low charge-rate for these bike chargers tends to balance them at the same time. And Li-ion may well be different than Li-po.

For most Li-ion appliances the batts are kept fully charged at all times. [shrug]

Self-discharge rate for both types seems to be very low, as compared to lead-acid batts for example.

The battery sellers recommend storing them fully charged, but that may simply be just due to the simple chargers offered.

This link was sent to me by another very knowledgeable member of this forum. Hope its helpful.
 

Browneye

Active Member
Odd...did not see another post. But there ya go...good information there, I had browsed that one before.
Some assumptions made, but solid nonetheless.

There are a couple of appropriate considerations for li-ion...one is that they don't have a 'memory' , so short discharges and recharges is not deleterious to them, so daily use and recharging them does not degrade them in excess of 'normal use'. And that they have a very low self discharge rate, so ongoing maintenance in long term storage is minimal.

Watching charge bars and storing at less than full charge is solid advice. Trying to 'exercise' a battery by running it all the way down before recharging it is not. Surely using an appropriate charger to the battery capacity and voltage is also solid.
 

Ryan71

Member
Odd...did not see another post. But there ya go...good information there, I had browsed that one before.
Some assumptions made, but solid nonetheless.

There are a couple of appropriate considerations for li-ion...one is that they don't have a 'memory' , so short discharges and recharges is not deleterious to them, so daily use and recharging them does not degrade them in excess of 'normal use'. And that they have a very low self discharge rate, so ongoing maintenance in long term storage is minimal.

Watching charge bars and storing at less than full charge is solid advice. Trying to 'exercise' a battery by running it all the way down before recharging it is not. Surely using an appropriate charger to the battery capacity and voltage is also solid.
@Browneye.....this was a response I received from another post I had previously posted hence why you didn't see it.
I was really hoping someone would chime it regarding weather or not I should be using both batteries or just let the new one sit in storage at around 50%.
Most people...I assume...have multiple batteries for range purposes where as I ended up with an extra one due to warranty issues. I had planned on using the battery that was replaced as it will still give me 10/15 miles & just store the new battery in a climate controlled area at half charge until the current battery dies completely. That being said I dont want to damage a perfectly good battery by not using it.....who knows I could get a year out of the "poor range" battery & dont want to ruin the replacement one by letting sit unused for years?
Hope that makes sense???
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
@Ravi.....Not helpful....calm your ego!
Thanks :)
As a battery scientist, it is my job to keep learning and do whatever I can do disseminate factual information.
So, I am curious to know how people perceive that information. am in the process of writing a script for a video that will be released on a fairly large YouTube channel and I want to correct if there are any errors.
So, it is from this perspective I asked him.
 

Ryan71

Member
Thanks :)
As a battery scientist, it is my job to keep learning and do whatever I can do disseminate factual information.
So, I am curious to know how people perceive that information. am in the process of writing a script for a video that will be released on a fairly large YouTube channel and I want to correct if there are any errors.
So, it is from this perspective I asked him.
@Ravi....my apologies, I thought maybe it was a dig & was not looking for an argument to ensue.
Thank you for the clarification!