Benefits of Ebikes - Outside magazine article

Dewey

Well-Known Member
The "cheater" slur seems to come from some hyper-competitive roadies who view every pass as a challenge, ebike hate in other forms includes AAA and the car lobby who don't want any increase in bicycle or micromobility ridership leading to calls for road calming measures on urban roads, from people who for various reasons don't want ebikes classed the same as bicycles including the MTB crowd who think ebikes may get their access to public land banned, and from people who just don't like being passed on trails. Legislative efforts of the bicycle industry are occasionally thwarted by self-appointed gatekeepers as in New York, eventually I hope we will see an easing of regulation - the NPS rule change this fall lifting the trail ban in National Parks was welcome, although like others I'm nervous if the order will withstand political change. I’d like to see ebike researchers like Chris Cherry at UTK and John MacArthur at PSU get funding to carry out a US study equivalent to the German naturalistic cycling study, equipping a variety of pedal bikes and ebikes with data measuring equipment, and getting some US data on path and road speed and behavior. A US study that included GPS data to measure actual rider behavior on trails/paths vs roads would help defuse the spurious pearl-clutching fear-mongering about potential speed differentials motivating ebike haters/trail gatekeepers to deliberately ignore the benefits of ebikes such as those described in the outsideonline article posted by the OP.
 
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FlatSix911

Active Member


We’ve got the science to prove it

Riding both types of bikes “placed the vast majority of participants in the vigorous-intensity heart rate zone,” the study authors concluded.


The average heart rate of a test subject riding an e-bike was 93.6 percent of those riding conventional bikes. Moreover, electric bikes appear to be an “excellent form of aerobic or cardiovascular exercise, even for experienced mountain bikers who regularly engage in this fitness activity.”

The researchers also surveyed their test subjects, both before and after riding, to determine their attitudes toward e-bikes. Some said their preconceived notions were confirmed, while others admitted the experiment subverted their beliefs. Most were positive toward e-bikes before the test, with only 18 percent saying they were opposed. Some attitudes changed, though, with fewer participants willing to admit after the test that e-bikes were just a passing fad.
 
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elect

Member
I didnt know yet the MET unit (Metabolic Equivalent Task) but I always wanted to "parametrize" somehow the cycling activity, good to know, thanks for the article (and the corresponding study)!

I'm gonna use that to help my now-retired parents on ebikes and leave the car in the garage
 

Over50

Well-Known Member
I liked this article better than most. I've read too many that are justifying e-bikes or are reviewing a particular e-bike but then always resort to the "they are great for the old, infirm or those who cannot otherwise ride a regular bike". This article focuses more on just the fact that e-bikes offer great benefits inherently and that the comparison should not always be "bike to bike":

"This means the comparison isn’t always e-bike to bike—it’s e-bike to sitting on your rear in a 180-horsepower, 4,000-pound sarcophagus."

To expand the list presented by @Timpo:

Driving my SUV = NOT cheating
Driving my SUV to the gym to ride a stationary bike = NOT cheating
 
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stanmiller

Member
My reply to "cheating"

An everyday cyclist exercises from 0-15 MPH, whereas I exercise from 15-30. I pedal on top of whatever pedal-assist baseline I set.

Stated another way. Let's say we're both climbing 50 stairs of a 100 story glass building. The everyday cyclist starts at the bottom and as an ebiker, I take an elevator to the 50th floor and start my climb there. We both climb 50 floors. What's the difference? I have a better view.

And lastly, the circular argument. This thing is heavy, of course I need a motor on it.
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
I look at it this way. I ride my conventional bike 20 miles during an average workout.

With an average load, my ebike is capable of doing 20 miles on a single charge using electric power alone.

During an average ebike workout, I ride 50 miles on a single battery charge.

The bike provides the energy for 20 of those miles and my pedaling is responsible for the remaining 30.

This means I'm providing the energy for an additional 10 miles during each outing, a 50% increase.
 

AlanDB

Well-Known Member
I look at it this way. I ride my conventional bike 20 miles during an average workout.

With an average load, my ebike is capable of doing 20 miles on a single charge using electric power alone.

During an average ebike workout, I ride 50 miles on a single battery charge.

The bike provides the energy for 20 of those miles and my pedaling is responsible for the remaining 30.

This means I'm providing the energy for an additional 10 miles during each outing, a 50% increase.
One of the things I like about my Bosch Nyon display and associated eBike Connect app is that for each ride, the app calculates and displays the amount of "work" the motor did and the amount you did (as a percent). I ride almost exclusively in the Eco mode (lowest assist level) and on most rides the app shows the motor provides 40% to 42% and I provide 58% to 60%. I know it is just some algorithm Bosch uses and one could argue with the formula, but I find it helpful and motivating.
 

Ger42

New Member
Not sure what the problem poeple are haiving with E-Bikes. I am 77 retired wife is still working she has a car. I just sold my Pickup and have an E-Trike waiting to be delivered it will be my transportation to the gym, doctor appts and to run errands. I save $1,000 on insurance, $gas, and $repairs on the Pickup. I pollute the air a hell of a lot less. WIn for me and a win for the climate. I had a fat tire bike I rode everywhere but got rid of it beacasue of my knees. I need the E-motor to get around.