British Columbia (Canada) Parks rolls out new e-bike policy to protect sensitive ecosystems

Browneye

Member
That's my point - regulate the rider, not the bike.
I was born there and I still think they're idiots. Oh well. LOL
 

Toomanycats

Active Member
You keep potential speed down, a little, but add complexity to the rules and keep out some people with some revenue.

If I rode at 20 mph the whole time I would not be tolerated...everybody has a responsibility to control their vehicle
My Toyota’s speedometer claims that it can go 160 mph. Given that it’s a 4 cyl, I think that’s wishful thinking. There are no regulations banning my car, or any other car, from areas with lower speed limits.
What I think might be a growing problem are the “bikes” that have pedals, and are technically classified as ebikes, but aren’t likely to ever be pedaled much. I’m thinking of some of the new offerings in Juiced Bike’s lineup, for example.
I’m not trying to beat up on throttle bikes. I can see where that boost really can help someone who is elderly or disabled. I’m just wondering if it might be necessary at some point to address that issue in terms of trails and off road use.
 

Captain Slow

Active Member
Unusual definition of class 3. I thought class 3 was typically 45 KM/h, but with no throttle. Raleigh has a class 3 bike with a throttle option, but if you engage the throttle it drops the assisted speed from 45 KM/h down to 32 KM/h to comply with class 2 rules in most jurisdictions, since class 3 is usually throttle-less.

What's interesting about this for me is that it seems to be presaging new motor vehicles rules for British Columbia. At present, BC's motor vehicle act doesn't have the 3 class system, but them using it in their new parks policy suggests they're anticipating updates to bring the 3 class system to our motor vehicle act. That'd be pretty awesome. :)
That never occurred to me. I agree, it would be awesome to be able to buy a class 3 ebike for use on the road. For trails I'm fine with class 1. I will be 54 very soon and while I can still pedal up, it's really hard and having some power would be nice. Class 1 would be all I need to get up the long steep hills.
 

steve mercier

Well-Known Member
That never occurred to me. I agree, it would be awesome to be able to buy a class 3 ebike for use on the road. For trails I'm fine with class 1. I will be 54 very soon and while I can still pedal up, it's really hard and having some power would be nice. Class 1 would be all I need to get up the long steep hills.
I used to think there was no need for a throttle but having encountered several very elderly and /or handicapped cyclists using a throttle I understand now that they can be a wonderful thing.
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
Speed limits would likely have as much effect as class restrictions, as only the law abiding would honor either.

Unfortunately speed is only a small part of the issue. I would encourage anyone involved with ebiking to contact their legislators and regulators to find out all the reasoning behind the regulations. Being involved in access issues locally I've found the explanations much more complex than just the speed issue. Some regulators know nothing about ebikes and others know a lot. Then there are some that know nothing and don't even want to learn. We need to be the educators, the ambassadors for ebikes. But going in with an all or nothing attitude won't work because the other side have tax paying citizens too, with the same mindset. They have an easier path to victory. They feel 'we were doing fine without ebikes, keep them banned'. Or, 'this new headache is too much trouble. Ban them all'.

Regulators and legislators have to balance everyone's concerns. It's much easier to work for better and more access from the inside. As for speed limits, I fear most will not be happy when they are enforced. I've seen many trails and paths with speed limits and none have been higher than 15 mph and I've seen limits as low as 9 mph. That wouldn't go over well with acoustic or assisted riders.
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
I don't know how it works in Canada but here in the US, the handicapped / disabled factor could easily be addressed at no cost to the government or cyclist. Simply amend the law to allow ebike use if a handicapped parking placard is displayed.
 

Toomanycats

Active Member
Speed limits would likely have as much effect as class restrictions, as only the law abiding would honor either.

Unfortunately speed is only a small part of the issue. I would encourage anyone involved with ebiking to contact their legislators and regulators to find out all the reasoning behind the regulations. Being involved in access issues locally I've found the explanations much more complex than just the speed issue. Some regulators know nothing about ebikes and others know a lot. Then there are some that know nothing and don't even want to learn. We need to be the educators, the ambassadors for ebikes. But going in with an all or nothing attitude won't work because the other side have tax paying citizens too, with the same mindset. They have an easier path to victory. They feel 'we were doing fine without ebikes, keep them banned'. Or, 'this new headache is too much trouble. Ban them all'.

Regulators and legislators have to balance everyone's concerns. It's much easier to work for better and more access from the inside. As for speed limits, I fear most will not be happy when they are enforced. I've seen many trails and paths with speed limits and none have been higher than 15 mph and I've seen limits as low as 9 mph. That wouldn't go over well with acoustic or assisted riders.
Agreed. There’s a contingent of mountain bikers out there who’s thinking goes something like this :
“We had to work really hard to win trail access. We don’t want ebikers to blow it for us”.
There are a few bad apples out there of every type.
Personally, I can’t walk very far, but I can ride. Emtb would give me access to the trails again.