Changing brakes pads - open bleeding port when resetting pistons?

little_harry

New Member
Hi

Yesterday I changed brake pads on my R&M Load 75. I had a hard time with pushing the pistons back, and it resulted in a very snug fit for the new pads. Then I watched this video on YouTube, and he recommended to open the bleeding port when you push the pistons back. Because it will be much easier to push the pistons back.

Is this a good idea? Could I brake something?

Take a look around 8:55 in this video:
 

WilliamT

Active Member
I do my own hydraulic brake maintenance and when installing new pads, I use this tool to open up the pistons.

You can open up the bleeding port but I don't think its necessary. It won't break anything but I've had no problems leaving it closed.

I only open up the bleed port if there is air in the system and I need to get it out.
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
Got a nice laugh little Harry, thanks! "Changing breaks pads", "Could I brake something?"
Did you clean and lube the outside of the pistons with the proper brake fluid before trying to push them back? If not you were scraping off crud as well as pushing them back.
 

MikeDD

Active Member
I used an gasket scraper to spread the pistons. It is similar to the Park tool. Its made to remove gaskets for engines, etc.
 

little_harry

New Member
Got a nice laugh little Harry, thanks! "Changing breaks pads", "Could I brake something?"
Did you clean and lube the outside of the pistons with the proper brake fluid before trying to push them back? If not you were scraping off crud as well as pushing them back.
Happy to hear that I gave you a good laugh :) I took a "break" and corrected the typo...

I tried to push the pistons back with a screwdriver before I removed the old pads, maybe that was a mistake? I cleaned the brakes from the "outside" before I started.

My problem was not that I forgot to push them back, my problem is that it was really hard to push them back.

Does this video make sense for cleaning pistons?

 

rich c

Well-Known Member
Yup, that's the ticket. Make sure what fluid is used for your bike, DOT or mineral oil based. Don't mix them up as the wrong one could attack the seals.
 

007craft

New Member
I do my own hydraulic brake maintenance and when installing new pads, I use this tool to open up the pistons.

You can open up the bleeding port but I don't think its necessary. It won't break anything but I've had no problems leaving it closed.

I only open up the bleed port if there is air in the system and I need to get it out.

For anybody reading this in the future, MAKE SURE YOU OPEN YOUR BLEEDING PORT!. I did not open my bleeding port and kept using alot of force to try and close the pistons. The pistons would not close enough and by using so much force I put way to much back pressure in the system and popped the top screw a smidge by the bleeding port. Now theres no seal and I need to replace the entire brake Assembly. So you definitely CAN break something. Its a shame because I watched so many videos online and none of them mentioned opening the bleeding port before you push your pistons back in. On the tekpro brakes that come with the crosscurrent S, you deff need to :(
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
Hi

Yesterday I changed brake pads on my R&M Load 75. I had a hard time with pushing the pistons back, and it resulted in a very snug fit for the new pads. Then I watched this video on YouTube, and he recommended to open the bleeding port when you push the pistons back. Because it will be much easier to push the pistons back.

Is this a good idea? Could I brake something?

Take a look around 8:55 in this video:
That is a great video!
Thanks for sharing quality content.
 

Handlebars

Active Member
For anybody reading this in the future, MAKE SURE YOU OPEN YOUR BLEEDING PORT!. I did not open my bleeding port and kept using alot of force to try and close the pistons. The pistons would not close enough and by using so much force I put way to much back pressure in the system and popped the top screw a smidge by the bleeding port. Now theres no seal and I need to replace the entire brake Assembly. So you definitely CAN break something. Its a shame because I watched so many videos online and none of them mentioned opening the bleeding port before you push your pistons back in. On the tekpro brakes that come with the crosscurrent S, you deff need to :(
Thank you much for posting it, 007craft. I am a disk brake noob about to do my tektro brakes.
 

bob armani

Well-Known Member
For anybody reading this in the future, MAKE SURE YOU OPEN YOUR BLEEDING PORT!. I did not open my bleeding port and kept using alot of force to try and close the pistons. The pistons would not close enough and by using so much force I put way to much back pressure in the system and popped the top screw a smidge by the bleeding port. Now theres no seal and I need to replace the entire brake Assembly. So you definitely CAN break something. Its a shame because I watched so many videos online and none of them mentioned opening the bleeding port before you push your pistons back in. On the tekpro brakes that come with the crosscurrent S, you deff need to :(
007craft-QUOTE- "Its a shame because I watched so many videos online and none of them mentioned opening the bleeding port before you push your pistons back in."
I am going to be doing a brake bleed and I was also viewing a how to video endorsed by Park Tool pushing in brake pistons and they never mention opening the port either. Quite strange considering they are usually very thorough in their instructional videos. Thanks for the heads up!
 

sl_duck

Member
You probably won't need to open the bleed port if both:
a) the pads your are installing are no thicker than the old ones when they were new
b) it's about the same temperature as when the system was filled last time. (the fluid expands when warm, and if the reservoir is completely full a temperature increase can make the brakes drag)