Dirt roads/paths?

Operator7

Active Member
Hi guys and gals,

Well I managed to get my boss to buy my Eflow for the office, and have ordered an ST1. The Eflow is great for commuting around the city, as it has plenty of torque, and the top speed of 28mph isn't needed. At any rate, my boss was asking me if he was able to ride this on a dirt road. I figured I would ask you all, as I really am not sure. My instinct would be to keep this bike on nothing but smooth pavement, as to not put any of the parts off alignment, but I'm a complete noob, so what the heck do I know? So having said that, how much can this bike be ridden on rougher paths?
 

Dfstarman

Active Member
I tried it on a pitted dirt road and it made my teeth chatter, unless it's very smooth I would say no. That's why I just bought a Neo Jumper for the full suspension in addition.
 

Operator7

Active Member
My very rookie guess would be that bumpy roads would make all of the parts on this thing shake, and possibly fall out of alignment. Not sure if that's true or not, but this definitely doesn't seem like a mountain bike - then again, I could never get the front suspension fork to unlock.
 

Ann M.

Well-Known Member
Naw, don't worry about your basic packed trail; shouldn't be a problem for the eflow. Nothing's going to fall out of alignment any different than on a regular bike. Do your maintenance, keep the tires inflated properly and the wheels trued and go ride. The wheels, including the motor in the rear are locked using the same mechanism as on a typical mountain bike. Not sure about long term use on a full fledged mountain bike trail but my own experience with a bunch of miles on semi-paved bumpy roads was that it was good.

If your shock won't unlock, see your dealer about this; makes a big difference on the bike's performance.
 

Operator7

Active Member
Naw, don't worry about your basic packed trail; shouldn't be a problem for the eflow. Nothing's going to fall out of alignment any different than on a regular bike. Do your maintenance, keep the tires inflated properly and the wheels trued and go ride. The wheels, including the motor in the rear are locked using the same mechanism as on a typical mountain bike. Not sure about long term use on a full fledged mountain bike trail but my own experience with a bunch of miles on semi-paved bumpy roads was that it was good.

If your shock won't unlock, see your dealer about this; makes a big difference on the bike's performance.

Thanks Ann!
 

Brian B

New Member
I tried a loose gravel road once, but wouldn't do it again. I lost traction once on a curve and then again going down a hill. Feel very lucky to have walked away without injury.
 

Ann M.

Well-Known Member
Loose gravel is a sneaky one, better for the fat tire types in this case. Cut a corner close one day when in a hurry and oh boy! a little sand and small gravel...guess who won (not me) :rolleyes: