Down size 26 to 24

dpayne

New Member
I own a new bike which I enjoy but have problems because I am short. Want to know how hard it would be to put 24 in wheels on this bike. Any help or information will be appreciated.
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
How much clearance with the pedal cranks and the ground? Might need shorter cranks. Disc brakes or rim brakes? Rim brakes won't adapt. No idea what kind of electrical system you have. Hub motor will need to be restrung on a small wheel. So depending on what eBike you have, could easily be more economical to sell and buy a bike that fits.
 

FlatSix911

Active Member
I own a new bike which I enjoy but have problems because I am short. Want to know how hard it would be to put 24 in wheels on this bike. Any help or information will be appreciated.
We need more specific details to help... what bike do you own?
 

Thomas Jaszewski

Well-Known Member
I have an old "girls" Schwinn that I converted to 26" from a 27". I found long reach rim brakes to solve. I've also seen builders fashion a drop plate for the brake calipers. But generally agree with rich c, unless you're very handy a conversion will be a nightmare and like quite costly.
 

dpayne

New Member
How much clearance with the pedal cranks and the ground? Might need shorter cranks. Disc brakes or rim brakes? Rim brakes won't adapt. No idea what kind of electrical system you have. Hub motor will need to be restrung on a small wheel. So depending on what eBike you have, could easily be more economical to sell and buy a bike that fits.
I am open to that, I could see how that goes. I thought about buying a setback seat post and a noseless seat?
 

harryS

Well-Known Member
Unless you have access to cheap used parts, you'll spend about $75 for a front wheel/tire.The rear will be $20 for tire/tube, $25 for a rim, $50 for spokes plus labor ($50?) to remove and lace up the motor. This gets you one inch for your $200-$250. Really not cost effective.

Changing over to a solid front fork will lower the front of the bike several inches and probably also get you an inch at the seat.

If the frame is steel, someone could cut the seat post and lower the clamp a little. This is reasonably safe with steel. You would need it looked at by a frame expert if it's aluminum.
 

dpayne

New Member
Unless you have access to cheap used parts, you'll spend about $75 for a front wheel/tire.The rear will be $20 for tire/tube, $25 for a rim, $50 for spokes plus labor ($50?) to remove and lace up the motor. This gets you one inch for your $200-$250. Really not cost effective.

Changing over to a solid front fork will lower the front of the bike several inches and probably also get you an inch at the seat.

If the frame is steel, someone could cut the seat post and lower the clamp a little. This is reasonably safe with steel. You would need it looked at by a frame expert if it's aluminum.
I purchased this on eBay it's a $600 bike. I really know very little about bikes, I was a watchmaker and own a clock shop for years so I am somewhat mechanical. I am not aware of all the things available to make this work for me. Can you recommend the type of fork? I appreciate your help.
 

FlatSix911

Active Member
I purchased this on eBay it's a $600 bike. I really know very little about bikes, I was a watchmaker and own a clock shop for years so I am somewhat mechanical. I am not aware of all the things available to make this work for me. Can you recommend the type of fork? I appreciate your help.
A new front fork is the cheapest solution to lower the bike a few inches.
Your local bike shop can replace the front suspension and the old part can be resold.
If you are mechanical, the swap to a rigid fork is not difficult... finding the part new part can be. ;)
 

harryS

Well-Known Member
It's probably a 1 1/8" threadless fork., You need a simple steel one with disk brake mounts. Something like this. They ought to be less money, but the low cost forks with disk brake tabs are less common. Origin-8 is a good brand. Maybe your local bike shop has some forks taken off bikes.

.

You'll need a star nut, and hopefully the old crown race (lower bearing) pops off the suspension fork, otherwise, one of them too. Watch youtube video for fork replacement tutorial. Verify you have a threadless fork and it's 1 1/8".

I added suspension forks to a couple of bikes. One of them, now I can barely touich the ground. 30" inseam.
 
I own a new bike which I enjoy but have problems because I am short. Want to know how hard it would be to put 24 in wheels on this bike. Any help or information will be appreciated.
I don't dispute any of the technical suggestions offered to 'lower' your bike. I wouldn't do it. If you have the funds, I'd do as Rich C suggested,
sell the bike and buy one from a local bike shop that has been sized for you by someone who is competent. From what you've written
you barely have standover clearance now. My guess and it is just that, a guess, is you'll need to gain 2 inches to meet your needs. That's a significant downsize.
 

dpayne

New Member
I don't dispute any of the technical suggestions offered to 'lower' your bike. I wouldn't do it. If you have the funds, I'd do as Rich C suggested,
sell the bike and buy one from a local bike shop that has been sized for you by someone who is competent. From what you've written
you barely have standover clearance now. My guess and it is just that, a guess, is you'll need to gain 2 inches to meet your needs. That's a significant downsize.
I coming to the conclusion that if I want a bike that fits I will have to build one. Been looking at the Huffy mountain bike as a starting point. Is a 24 in with disc brakes.
 

indianajo

Well-Known Member
Other short people have complained that nobody stocks bikes for them. In addition, after a shop takes measurements, you have to pay for the bike up front before you ever try it out. Curse of the compact.
I had to buy the bike left from California, sight unseen. I have a 28" inseam. Sort of fits but I'd like the handlebars closer and the front wheel further away. Can't buy such a thing. It is an unpowered bike. I put a $220 ebikeling geared hubmotor kit on it with a lunabike battery. I should have bought the battery from ebikeling, he has a reputation. Luna battery is fine, they sell a MAC geared hubmotor for about $500. You'll need a drill motor, drills, hacksaw, vise,3" grinder wheel on mandrel, safety glasses, Klein terminal crimp tool.
Beware of geared hubmotor on long steep grades, they overheat. But DD motors are such a drag unpowered. No long grades here in indiana, but there are some in Oregon. Best of luck.
 

dpayne

New Member
Other short people have complained that nobody stocks bikes for them. In addition, after a shop takes measurements, you have to pay for the bike up front before you ever try it out. Curse of the compact.
I had to buy the bike left from California, sight unseen. I have a 28" inseam. Sort of fits but I'd like the handlebars closer and the front wheel further away. Can't buy such a thing. It is an unpowered bike. I put a $220 ebikeling geared hubmotor kit on it with a lunabike battery. I should have bought the battery from ebikeling, he has a reputation. Luna battery is fine, they sell a MAC geared hubmotor for about $500. You'll need a drill motor, drills, hacksaw, vise,3" grinder wheel on mandrel, safety glasses, Klein terminal crimp tool.
Beware of geared hubmotor on long steep grades, they overheat. But DD motors are such a drag unpowered. No long grades here in indiana, but there are some in Oregon. Best of luck.
You can purchase a set back seat post. This would move your seat back in addition to moving it with it's rails. That would move the Handel bars further away.