Dual motor. Mid and rear drive on RadWagon

ebikemom

Administrator
Staff member
Wow! Why add another motor? I'm not criticizing--it's a sincere question. :) Do you use them simultaneously? Make a choice between them? Or ???
 

JAG

New Member
I’ve got a huge hill next to my house on the way to the bike trail. It turns out that the rear motor adds very little to the climb. I think I am going to switch to the mid motor alone.
 

WilliamT

Active Member
I've had similar experiences with my Radwagon so I added a front geared hub motor (battery in blue bag).


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What speeds can you get with the BBSHD on the Radwagon? The gearing limits how fast you can pedal. Also where did you attach Radwagon PAS with the mid-drive?
 

JAG

New Member
It will get to 35mph. I have the PAS disconnected and I’m still thinking about how and where it could be placed. It may take some fabricating. Where you able to solve this problem?
 

WilliamT

Active Member
Since I'm running a second hub, I still have my original chainrings.

If you want both, you would have to hook up the PAS on the other side. I kept my Radwagon PAS where it was and put my front motor PAS on the other side of the crank. Attach the magnetic "wheel" to the crank and leave the sensor on the frame with some zip ties.

I'm just not sure if the Radwagon PAS is attached to the chainring or bottom bracket spindle. If the former, then you'll need to come up with a way to attach it to the spindle. Or just see if you can order a magnetic wheel somewhere. It's not anything special, just magnets that need to hit cross the sensor.
 

Dmitri

Active Member
Won't the two motors compete if turned on simultaneously? Also, doubling the power should theoretically double the stress on the wheel -- how is this handled?

Speaking of two-motor systems, one observation I made is that 2WD systems (rear and front hub drives) typically add very little to mobility. If one wheel digs itself into snow, then so does the other, and there's very little that can a two-sided drive adds to the picture.
 

JAG

New Member
Won't the two motors compete if turned on simultaneously? Also, doubling the power should theoretically double the stress on the wheel -- how is this handled?

Speaking of two-motor systems, one observation I made is that 2WD systems (rear and front hub drives) typically add very little to mobility. If one wheel digs itself into snow, then so does the other, and there's very little that can a two-sided drive adds to the picture.

Hello Domitian, Great question and comment. The bike rides fine. So, I guess the rear wheel is handling the stress. I also have an Emotion EVO 29er snow AWD. It has 250 front and 350 rear and there is a noticeable difference from when you turn one or the other off. I say noticeable because it doesn’t feel like double. I need to research the idea of simultaneous competing motors.
 

Thomas Jaszewski

Well-Known Member
Hello Domitian, Great question and comment. The bike rides fine. So, I guess the rear wheel is handling the stress. I also have an Emotion EVO 29er snow AWD. It has 250 front and 350 rear and there is a noticeable difference from when you turn one or the other off. I say noticeable because it doesn’t feel like double. I need to research the idea of simultaneous competing motors.
Programmable controllers will solve any issue.

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