E-bike riding instruction and tips

Handlebars

Active Member
I noticed a post about trouble riding ebike with one hand on the bars when using hand signals and from there I thought a bit and noticed that there isn't much instruction for ebike riders at all. There's lots of very good motorcycle instruction but nothing for ebike. There are difficulties peculiar to ebike control - another example is some awkwardness turning right after a stop sign, from the jolt due to the motor switching on.

Give us your riding tips that are specifically for ebike riding!
 

christob

Well-Known Member
Pedal assist only here (no throttle)...
This wouldn't be ebike specific -- but -- it took me awhile in the beginning (having not been on a bike in decades) to get in the constant habit of downshifting my gears as I approached a stop light or signaled crossing. Despite the assist I had (tho I tend to stay in lower levels anyway) sometimes I'd roll up to a stop having just been pedaling in a medium-high gear. When the light turned green, I'd find myself stuck in that higher gear, struggling to get the pedals going vs. a lower gear.
 

johnriggins410

New Member
Not sure of your point? I thought it pretty obvious a couple of riders were noting an issue and how they handle it. My comment was for those following later on. I didn't want them to think that all bikes were like that.
of course they're all not like that. the user is just inquiring about riding tips that are specific for ebike riding and i gave him one
 

indianajo

Well-Known Member
Mostly when I give a hand signal to indicate a turn, drivers wave back. They have no idea what I am communicating. Frequently when I move to the left of the lane and stick out my arm to turn left, the car behind speeds up to pass me on the left while they still can. So I am de-emphasizing the importance of proper hand signals.
 
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jim6b

Active Member
I signal my left turns across traffic very clearly so that a car coming from behind will not try to pass in the on coming lane as I enter the turn.

Can't say any of these cars think I am waving at them, though they probably wish I would get out of the middle of 'their' lane.
 

Tars Tarkas

Active Member
Mostly when I give a hand signal to indicate a turn, drivers wave back. They have no idea what I am communicating. So I am de-emphasizing the importance of proper hand signals.
Just because a lot of people don't use them and maybe some people don't know what hand signals are, I strongly disagree that that's a reason not to use them. Better to use signals and not need them than to need them and not use them. Be the problem or be the solution.

TT
 

Handlebars

Active Member
rich c! Not getting riding tips can be painful quickly!

Here's something I would say is necessary for an ebike noob like me: always keep fingers on the rear brake when sitting at a stop in case you crank the pedal one more notch and the bike takes off.
 

harryS

Well-Known Member
Bells and mirrors are accessories, but my riding tip to have them for urban riding. I naturally disdained the little kid ring-a-ding bells originally. but have found that on bike paths most walkers will hear them better than the single clapper bell preferred by purists.
 

Quedecree

Member
The two biggest tips I can think of are - with a hub motor, keep some light pressure on the brake lever when maneuvering at low speed to prevent the motor from suddenly kicking in (that's assuming you've got sensors in the brake lever that cut the motor). And with the mid drive, lighten your pedaling effort when you're changing gears.
 

Handlebars

Active Member
I'm still experimenting with finding the best way to make a smooth right turn after stopping. I would like a smooth acceleration. Using throttle-on without backing off is smooth after the first lurch, but also quicker than I would prefer and I would like to eliminate the first lurch altogether. Using pedals to help the motor would be first choice, but the lurching on-off effect that some bikes have isn't good for a smooth turn - and as well, I don't want to be doing multiple gear shifts just to get going.
Other than using the rear brake plus motor to simulate clutch action, not getting really smooth turns yet while ending up in a usable gear without all the shifting.
 

Handlebars

Active Member
I have been paying attention to what I do to make riding easier with one hand while signalling.
Keeping on pedalling is best, then it's just like a regular bike and the motor won't kick on or off while riding with one hand ( or no hands) on bars.
 

Toomanycats

Active Member
Pedal assist only here (no throttle)...
This wouldn't be ebike specific -- but -- it took me awhile in the beginning (having not been on a bike in decades) to get in the constant habit of downshifting my gears as I approached a stop light or signaled crossing. Despite the assist I had (tho I tend to stay in lower levels anyway) sometimes I'd roll up to a stop having just been pedaling in a medium-high gear. When the light turned green, I'd find myself stuck in that higher gear, struggling to get the pedals going vs. a lower gear.
This is why I don’t ever turn my motor off- I’ll leave it in eco. Leave it off, forget and start in too high a gear, and it can be tough to get the bike rolling.
 
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Toomanycats

Active Member
Something I ran into today when I saw a group of ebike riders.
if you’re new to cycling in general, learn some basic group bike etiquette.
I don’t think this group of riders was being deliberately rude, so much as they maybe didn’t know.
Don’t overlap wheels with other riders. It’s dangerous, and it’s considered rude. If you can’t safely pass someone, ride behind them till you can pass.
When you are going to pass other riders, warn them. You don’t have to scream “On your left” in their ears, but ring a bell, do something.
I saw this same group group of cyclists pass a rider who had pulled abreast of another rider to pass. It was a really dangerous situation.They didn’t warn him.
Before I get flamed, lots of analog bike riders are rude and clueless. It’s just that if you’re riding an ebike, you’re riding at speed. You have to be a little more aware.