E-trike for relatively short trips with some cargo capacity for 70+ year old

rich c

Well-Known Member
#21
I worked in Coral Springs for 11 years - it had levees built around it with giant drainage pumps so when it rained more than 2 or 3 inches, the giant pumps would kick on. So, right, you're not too far off with the sea level thing.

On the other hand there are some good sized inclines coming out of bike/golf cart under and over passes. And central FL has some nice hills - not like western NC mountains where I live now, though.

As I suggested earlier, the noise of the tires on a bike is not all bad - a bit of a "here I come" noise will give folks a heads up.

My limited experience with delta trikes generally is if the driver is too aggressive in turns, he will either 2-wheel it or dump over. There is a "leaning" curve (pun intended) involved in aggressive turn management. I learned that when test driving a relatively low slung pedal powered delta a couple years ago.

So which trike do you suggest as a fun hauler?
I suggest you ride a knobby tired trike before you decide if the noise isn't that bad. When I finally got off the pavement and on grass with my tad pole, it was like heaven that the noise stopped. I ride for relaxation, not to hear an endless rumble.
I have very few places I can go to haul things. I'm very fearful of getting hit from behind on streets from distracted drivers. My wife was rear ended twice in 1 1/2 years in our car. Both times sitting still at a red light! I'm also not a fan of riding around 10mph with a traditional trike. The only hauler I would be interested in is a cargo two wheeler.
 
#22
I suggest you ride a knobby tired trike before you decide if the noise isn't that bad. When I finally got off the pavement and on grass with my tad pole, it was like heaven that the noise stopped. I ride for relaxation, not to hear an endless rumble.
I have very few places I can go to haul things. I'm very fearful of getting hit from behind on streets from distracted drivers. My wife was rear ended twice in 1 1/2 years in our car. Both times sitting still at a red light! I'm also not a fan of riding around 10mph with a traditional trike. The only hauler I would be interested in is a cargo two wheeler.
The trikes I'm mostly interested in go to speeds of 20+mph.

I'm having trouble figuring out how a two wheel hauler would be better or safer than a well designed motorized trike for a 70+ year old guy. I expect to keep my trips confined to my fairly extensive community on either bike paths or 25 mph streets with occasional trips to contiguous shopping.

Regarding tire noise from nobby tires, one poster earlier mentioned he prefers knobbies because they are less likely to get punctured by road debris. That would be my thinking and priority as well. My primary purpose in riding will be more utilitarian (shopping, hauling, exercise) more than relaxation. I relax by sitting, reading, watching TV or birds more than riding a bike keeping my head on a swivel to keep myself from getting run over by a truck.
 
#23
Those "crowd funded" scare the hell or of me. Send us your money and we'll order a container of pre sold bikes when enough people send us money. You'll get it at the end of summer if you are lucky.
I was texting with a fellow at eTrike.com last night. Within the next couple of months they are coming out with nearly the exact trike as that yellow Addmotor chopper. Of course they're claiming a few more "refinements", but how would they know that Motan isn't doing their own 'refinements" unless eTrike had spies in their shop?
 

ELK

New Member
#24
I was texting with a fellow at eTrike.com last night. Within the next couple of months they are coming out with nearly the exact trike as that yellow Addmotor chopper. Of course they're claiming a few more "refinements", but how would they know that Motan isn't doing their own 'refinements" unless eTrike had spies in their shop?
Do they have a website? Is that electric trike.com?
 
#26
Those "crowd funded" scare the hell or of me. Send us your money and we'll order a container of pre sold bikes when enough people send us money. You'll get it at the end of summer if you are lucky.
To get this thread back on track, my point wasn't crowd funding sites or scaring the hell out of anyone. It was to show a new design of an e-trike to ask those who are more knowledgable than I, in the context of my opening post , how well it might meet my criteria compared to:

* Available fat trikes
* Evelo Compass

I do like the idea of a more semi-recumbant design of this new model, but would like other opinions, pro and con.
 

indianajo

Well-Known Member
#27
If it is what you want, fine.
I'm age 68 and 170 lb. I carry up to 70 lb supplies on the 2 wheel cargo bike left. I've carried a 6000 BTU A/C home in the box. I carried a 44 lb 60 key synthesizer home last month down a mile long 10% grade. Tomorrow the load will be 45 lb groceries.
Considering who rides trikes in my experience, starting with Andy Devine's outhouse trike in the Roy Rogers shorts, up through the *** ***s that **** around on them in my town, I won't be riding a trike. Trike pedal carts may be more fashionable in retirement haven Florida. With the winds I have to fight in the midwest, the less frontal area I present to the air, the faster I get there. It was 36 mph steady with gusts up to 49 mph when I went out Sunday morning. I was happy to have 10 lb of tools in the bags to hold me down.
It is not as if I don't get vertigo spells, either. Turned my head too fast at work today, had to stand there a while. Most drivers besides my wife in cars make me ill from the motion. But I'm fine on a bicycle.
 
#28
If it is what you want, fine.
I'm age 68 and 170 lb. I carry up to 70 lb supplies on the 2 wheel cargo bike left. I've carried a 6000 BTU A/C home in the box. I carried a 44 lb 60 key synthesizer home last month down a mile long 10% grade. Tomorrow the load will be 45 lb groceries.
Considering who rides trikes in my experience, starting with Andy Devine's outhouse trike in the Roy Rogers shorts, up through the *** ***s that **** around on them in my town, I won't be riding a trike. Trike pedal carts may be more fashionable in retirement haven Florida. With the winds I have to fight in the midwest, the less frontal area I present to the air, the faster I get there. It was 36 mph steady with gusts up to 49 mph when I went out Sunday morning. I was happy to have 10 lb of tools in the bags to hold me down.
It is not as if I don't get vertigo spells, either. Turned my head too fast at work today, had to stand there a while. Most drivers besides my wife in cars make me ill from the motion. But I'm fine on a bicycle.
Agreed. Compared to a 2-wheeler, this 3-wheel chopper would be a relative drag. Compared to an upright trike, I would think there would be somewhat less resistance. But at 20-25 mph how much would this really matter? And riding it almost exclusively in a sprawling 55+ central Florida community with 25 mph speed limits predominating...

No, at 73 a 2-wheeler is not in my future. If the flow of time were reversed, I would give a 2-wheeler serious consideration. I've come across too many bike riders my age who were more physically fit and experienced riders than I who have taken a tumble via some freak accident that would not have occurred on their recumbent trike.

So, to refocus my question, what are the pros and cons between the 3 styles of 3-wheelers I mentioned: Traditional Evelo, Fat trike upright, and Fat trike chopper.
 
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indianajo

Well-Known Member
#29
I can't really look at these links. THey all bomb out to a coupon or email subscription in 10 seconds. I'm not wading thorugh that.
The workman is steel and designed for absolutely flat crackless floor in a factory. It would take a hit from a forklift counterweight better than any other. That is not where you are riding.
It looked as if the evolo did not have disks on the back wheels. The addmotor you posted a picture of did. I'm highly in favor of disk brakes in the rain, unless you can find something with a bendix coaster brake (obsolete).
The best bike is the one you can test ride at a local dealer, who offers to deal with any quality problems for you. I don't think you are going to find that in a trike anywhere. Maybe LA.
I worry a lot more about being hit by a car than I do falling off. I've fallen off 5 times in the last 5 years, hitting my chin 4 times, the last time I broke my chin. Whoops. The chin didn't hurt, really, just was annoying having my teeth wired shut. My arms & shoulder are sore for a day or two afterwards. I wear a helmet with a chin guard now. On the bike left I'm as tall as a SUV, I wear a green+yellow vest and the helmet has yellow letters. Nobody has driven right over me yet. One guy did throw a steel pipe at me, but he hit the back wheel, which was annoying but not fatal. Living without risk is how my father retired, and a stroke took away his brain after 2 years in a lounge chair. I risk messy death daily on a bike, my heart is perfect, my choresterol is "just right", my diabetes number is "great", and I'm 11 years into my retirement.
 
#30
I can't really look at these links. THey all bomb out to a coupon or email subscription in 10 seconds. I'm not wading thorugh that.
The workman is steel and designed for absolutely flat crackless floor in a factory. It would take a hit from a forklift counterweight better than any other. That is not where you are riding.
It looked as if the evolo did not have disks on the back wheels. The addmotor you posted a picture of did. I'm highly in favor of disk brakes in the rain, unless you can find something with a bendix coaster brake (obsolete).
The best bike is the one you can test ride at a local dealer, who offers to deal with any quality problems for you. I don't think you are going to find that in a trike anywhere. Maybe LA.
I worry a lot more about being hit by a car than I do falling off. I've fallen off 5 times in the last 5 years, hitting my chin 4 times, the last time I broke my chin. Whoops. The chin didn't hurt, really, just was annoying having my teeth wired shut. My arms & shoulder are sore for a day or two afterwards. I wear a helmet with a chin guard now. On the bike left I'm as tall as a SUV, I wear a green+yellow vest and the helmet has yellow letters. Nobody has driven right over me yet. One guy did throw a steel pipe at me, but he hit the back wheel, which was annoying but not fatal. Living without risk is how my father retired, and a stroke took away his brain after 2 years in a lounge chair. I risk messy death daily on a bike, my heart is perfect, my choresterol is "just right", my diabetes number is "great", and I'm 11 years into my retirement.
My kind of guy. Fantastic!!!
 
#31
Ok, here is an observation about that new yellow chopper trike design:

I've viewed a number of EBR video reviews of front wheel drive delta trikes. One of the more common negative observations is front wheel spin when taking off. And that was on relatively "weight forward" upright designs, except for the Worksman stretch chopper.

This yellow fat tire chopper has the rider several inches further back away from the front drive wheel. That means less weight on the drive wheel, allowing even less traction. That would be further aggravated with a 20-30 lb. load in the rear basket. So, the stability under speed may be improved with the lower chopper design, but take off traction is likely to be degraded compared to the more upright fat tire 3 wheelers.

Your thoughts?
 
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#32
I am 72, 200' with balance issues as a result of neuropathy---normally walk with a cane. I live in Northern Florida very close to the ocean.

I really like the Addmotor M-360's ("chopper" as wrongly described by one poster) design and extras such as a 750 bafang motor with a 48v14ah battery, Altus M310 7 speed derailler, 20"X4" krusade kendal tires, etc . That should be sufficient torque/power to go just about wherever you want The M-360 is a unique design and I am purchasing the Addmotor 360 for $1599 when it first was listed on their site. Before you come down on Addmotor's crowdfunding let me explain that I also purchased their M-330 (an upright trike) when it first came out at crowdfunded price of $1799. I received it in August 2018 and I have ridden it 1400 miles without any difficulties. It is an incredible trike. I ride it on the ocean beach since I live just a few blocks from the Atlantic ocean. Of course I do clean the chain with degreaser and clean off sand and grit every few rides. I am just amazed at how it will plow through soft sand to get me to hard sand where I pedal a few miles each way. The pedal assist works great and the most I use is #2 since I want the exercise. It is easy to ride and steer.

In regards to the Addmotor 360 as a semi-recumbent cruise bike I am purchasing it since I am placing so many miles on my 330 I want to have two trikes (I have a third but it doesn't go through soft sand) to spread the miles and wear and tear on the trike. The M-360 was a steal at $1599 and now it is already at $1899 and in 8 days it will go up probably to $2299. I have followed Addmotor's pricing for he past year and it will never go back down to $1599 or $1899. After it goes up to its projected price of $2699 they will have sales which will only knock off a couple hundred. This looks like a crazy wild bike and it rivals the Trivel E-fat Azteca trike which sells for nearly $4000. Addmotor's M-360 is superior in my opinion because it only has a Shimano 7 gear derailler and doesn't have the complicated chainring of the Trivel (who needs all 21 gears when you have a motor). The battery placement is much better on the M-360 than the Trivel and I know first hand how sturdy and light weight the baskets of the Addmotor trikes are compared to wire baskets which are extra for the Trivel.

The seats on the Trivel and the Addmotor 360 seem to be pretty much the same. In any case, I know first hand that the Addmotor's craftsmanship is very good and I am not hesitating at all to buy another one of their trikes especially at the lower price point. Electric Bikes price point was noted to be about $2500 which is line with Addmotor's price point after the initial sale. I own the Liberty Trike as well so I know that Electric Bikes craftsmanship is very good and I would seriously consider their semi-recumbent trike since they are made in the US although I don't know the specs yet. However, it is not worth it to me to wait around for a trike that will be about $1000 more. I haven't had any problems with the M330 for the 9 months I have owned it so my only correspondence with Addmotor has been asking them where the serial number was located and they got back to me right away with that information.

I do expect the Trivel to come down in price with the competition but I am not enamored with their E-fat Azteca----also note that the E-fat Azteca only turns the right back wheel when you pedal and the same is true with the Liberty Trike which is made by electric trike although from the picturea above it looks like the electric trike has two disc brakes in the back. In addition only the right back wheel has a disc brake on the E-fat Azteca since the left wheel is a free wheel. On the Addmotor M-330 both back wheels turn when pedaling and both back wheels have disc brakes when braking. Of course all these trikes have front disc brakes. When you have both back wheels turning when you pedal it makes it a lot easier with a front mounted motor when you start out or go through soft sand etc.

Of course, if you buy from a local bike shop you have local service which is the case with the Trivel although there is not a bike shop with a Trivel anywhere close by and since I mainly service my own trikes it doesn't matter that much to me anyway. I haven' t found a trike comparable to the Addmotor trikes especially if you buy early at a significantly reduced price which has to be a factor in your decision making.

I would add one more issue regarding these trikes---replacement parts. Addmotor uses Bafang, Shimano, KMC, Tektra, Kendal and other commonly used parts for their trikes which is a good thing rather than proprietary parts. They are easily replaceable and while Electric Trikes uses some commonly used parts they also have had some proprietary parts on their trikes (I don't know if they will use a bafang motor or one of their own on the upcoming noted trike) and Trivel uses a proprietary motor and complicated parts such as their chainring(s) etc.

If you are concerned about how these types of trikes would work for you or how they compare to others then read EBR's review of the Trivel E-fat Azteca trike. This is an absolutely new kind of trike so no one can really comment on it other than someone who has reviewed the Azteca or purchased one since they are the only ones available right now. Even though I talk about the money side of the issue if I thought for a minute that the Azteca was a better trike I would have ordered one. There were just too many deal breakers for me---the one wheel pedaling, battery placement, too many gears, lower wattage and battery, etc but view Court's review and you make up your own mind. BTW---Court doesn't describe the Trivel E-fat Azteca as a "chopper" but as an "electric trike with recumbent body position" which is a more accurate and responsible description.

In any case, Addmotor (which are made in China) or Electric Trike have nothing over Alibaba since this has been offered on their site for some time:
1556054037542.png
 

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#33
I am 72, 200' with balance issues as a result of neuropathy---normally walk with a cane. I live in Northern Florida very close to the ocean.

I really like the Addmotor M-360's ("chopper" as wrongly described by one poster) design and extras such as a 750 bafang motor with a 48v14ah battery, Altus M310 7 speed derailler, 20"X4" krusade kendal tires, etc . That should be sufficient torque/power to go just about wherever you want The M-360 is a unique design and I am purchasing the Addmotor 360 for $1599 when it first was listed on their site. Before you come down on Addmotor's crowdfunding let me explain that I also purchased their M-330 (an upright trike) when it first came out at crowdfunded price of $1899. I received it in August 2018 and I have ridden it 1400 miles without any difficulties. It is an incredible trike. I ride it on the ocean beach since I live just a few blocks from the Atlantic ocean. Of course I do clean the chain with degreaser and clean off sand and grit every few rides. I am just amazed at how it will plow through soft sand to get me to hard sand where I pedal a few miles each way. The pedal assist works great and the most I use is #2 since I want the exercise. It is easy to ride and steer.

In regards to the Addmotor 360 as a semi-recumbent cruise bike I am purchasing it since I am placing so many miles on my 330 I want to have two trikes (I have a third but it doesn't go through soft sand) to spread the miles and wear and tear on the trike. The M-360 was a steal at $1599 and now it is already at $1899 and in 8 days it will go up probably to $2299. I have followed Addmotor's pricing for he past year and it will never go back down to $1599 or $1899. After it goes up to its projected price of $2699 they will have sales which will only knock off a couple hundred. This looks like a crazy wild bike and it rivals the Trivel E-fat Azteca trike which sells for nearly $4000. Addmotor's M-360 is superior in my opinion because it only has a Shimano 7 gear derailler and doesn't have the complicated chainring of the Trivel (who needs all 21 gears when you have a motor). The battery placement is much better on the M-360 than the Trivel and I know first hand how sturdy and light weight the baskets of the Addmotor trikes are compared to wire baskets which are extra for the Trivel.

The seats on the Trivel and the Addmotor 360 seem to be pretty much the same. In any case, I know first hand that the Addmotor's craftsmanship is very good and I am not hesitating at all to buy another one of their trikes especially at the lower price point. Electric Bikes price point was noted to be about $2500 which is line with Addmotor's price point after the initial sale. I own the Liberty Trike as well so I know that Electric Bikes craftsmanship is very good and I would seriously consider their semi-recumbent trike since they are made in the US although I don't know the specs yet. However, it is not worth it to me to wait around for a trike that will be about $1000 more. I haven't had any problems with the M330 for the 9 months I have owned it so my only correspondence with Addmotor has been asking them where the serial number was located and they got back to me right away with that information.

I do expect the Trivel to come down in price with the competition but I am not enamored with their E-fat Azteca----also note that the E-fat Azteca only turns the right back wheel when you pedal and the same is true with the Liberty Trike which is made by electric trike although from the picturea above it looks like the electric trike has two disc brakes in the back. In addition only the right back wheel has a disc brake on the E-fat Azteca since the left wheel is a free wheel. On the Addmotor M-330 both back wheels turn when pedaling and both back wheels have disc brakes when braking. Of course all these trikes have front disc brakes. When you have both back wheels turning when you pedal it makes it a lot easier with a front mounted motor when you start out or go through soft sand etc.

Of course, if you buy from a local bike shop you have local service which is the case with the Trivel although there is not a bike shop with a Trivel anywhere close by and since I mainly service my own trikes it doesn't matter that much to me anyway. I haven' t found a trike comparable to the Addmotor trikes especially if you buy early at a significantly reduced price which has to be a factor in your decision making.

I would add one more issue regarding these trikes---replacement parts. Addmotor uses Bafang, Shimano, KMC, Tektra, Kendal and other commonly used parts for their trikes which is a good thing rather than proprietary parts. They are easily replaceable and while Electric Trikes uses some commonly used parts they also have had some proprietary parts on their trikes (I don't know if they will use a bafang motor or one of their own on the upcoming noted trike) and Trivel uses a proprietary motor and complicated parts such as their chainring(s) etc.

If you are concerned about how these types of trikes would work for you or how they compare to others then read EBR's review of the Trivel E-fat Azteca trike. This is an absolutely new kind of trike so no one can really comment on it other than someone who has reviewed the Azteca or purchased one since they are the only ones available right now. Even though I talk about the money side of the issue if I thought for a minute that the Azteca was a better trike I would have ordered one. There were just too many deal breakers for me---the one wheel pedaling, battery placement, too many gears, lower wattage and battery, etc but view Court's review and you make up your own mind. BTW---Court doesn't describe the Trivel E-fat Azteca as a "chopper" but as an "electric trike with recumbent body position" which is a more accurate and responsible description.

In any case, Addmotor (which are made in China) or Electric Trike have nothing over Alibaba since this has been offered on their site for some time: View attachment 32443
A semi-recumbent, semi-chopper, semi-delta. I know, I know - that description will REALLY get me into trouble as being a trike type illiterate.

But good review and analysis. Very helpful. Unfortunately I won't be in a position to buy any of these until after we move in the next 2 to 3 months. Who knows what someone else might come out with by then.
 
#34
I just came across the not yet released "crowd funded" Motan Addmotor M360 "chopper" trike HERE. Really cool looking, has the features I'm looking for and the price is great: $1,599. Is anyone familiar with this product development/sales tactic? I have an inquiry into Motan and hope for a reply soon.

HERE is a website that discusses the various forms of and cautions about crowd funding. In the case of Motan, a deep discount is given to those who pay for the trike several months before its release and delivery, providing start up capital for that new line of bikes. That is my guess at it, anyway. The risk to the purchaser? I don't know the company's record or its history of successful product development and marketing. For those who are confident about the brand and seeking a sharp looking trike, this appears to be a great opportunity. I imagine some "in the know" bike dealers would be snapping some of these up.
See my response on page 2 regarding my experience with Addmotor and the M-330 (not the 360 since it isn't out yet). Hope you purchased one at $1599 if you wanted it because it is now $1899 and it will be higher in a few days.
 
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rich c

Well-Known Member
#35
Biggest disadvantage I see on the Addmotor is step over height. That top bar is higher than a fat 20" tire, so that makes the step over close to 26"
 
#36
A semi-recumbent, semi-chopper, semi-delta. I know, I know - that description will REALLY get me into trouble as being a trike type illiterate.

But good review and analysis. Very helpful. Unfortunately I won't be in a position to buy any of these until after we move in the next 2 to 3 months. Who knows what someone else might come out with by then.
And I'll have some more experience with Addmotor and the M-360 which I will report here. Now that Electric Trike is getting into the mix it will make it more interesting. I'm interested in seeing their specs on motor and battery.
Biggest disadvantage I see on the Addmotor is step over height. That top bar is higher than a fat 20" tire, so that makes the step over close to 26"
It is not 26 inches. It is maybe the same size as the tire which is about 23 inches since it is a fat tire. Since it is a recumbent with 20 inch fat tires you are already lower when you sit down and in general I would presume you would sit in it first and then swing your leg over. In fact when I get on my M-330 with a step over of only 15.5 inches I first sit in the seat which is at 30 inches, then lean back since I changed it to a seat with a back and then I swing my leg through. In addition, on a trike there is not as much of an issue stepping through as a regular bike. Once you are on the trike you don't need to get off until necessary. You can stop at stop lights and just stay on your trike and wait for the light to turn. I rarely if at all get off my M-330 during an hour and a half ride until it is over. If you look at the EBR review video of the E-fat Azteca at about 22:34 into the video Court has someone ride it and he does step over the bar but he could have mounted it as I suggested. My only question will be the height of the seat at its lowest setting since the only way to increase the height is to lengthen the seat bar which increases your leg length to the pedals. In any case, I prefer a seat that is higher since I could not ride a normal recumbent trike since the seat is too low. I would have difficulty getting in and out of it. It should also be noted that Court does not indicate that the step through height is an issue on his review of the E-fat Azteca and he is short at 5' 7", I think he once stated. Anyway, in time we'll get it figured out.
 
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#37
And I'll have some more experience with Addmotor and the M-360 which I will report here. Now that Electric Trike is getting into the mix it will make it more interesting. I'm interested in seeing their specs on motor and battery.


It is not 26 inches. It is maybe the same size as the tire which is about 23 inches since it is a fat tire. Since it is a recumbent with 20 inch fat tires you are already lower when you sit down and in general I would presume you would sit in it first and then swing your leg over. In fact when I get on my M-330 with a step over of only 15.5 inches I first sit in the seat which is at 30 inches, then lean back since I changed it to a seat with a back and then I swing my leg through. In addition, on a trike there is not as much of an issue stepping through as a regular bike. Once you are on the trike you don't need to get off until necessary. You can stop at stop lights and just stay on your trike and wait for the light to turn. I rarely if at all get off my M-330 during an hour and a half ride until it is over. If you look at the EBR review video of the E-fat Azteca at about 22:34 into the video Court has someone ride it and he does step over the bar but he could have mounted it as I suggested. My only question will be the height of the seat at its lowest setting since the only way to increase the height is to lengthen the seat bar which increases your leg length to the pedals. In any case, I prefer a seat that is higher since I could not ride a normal recumbent trike since the seat is too low. I would have difficulty getting in and out of it. It should also be noted that Court does not indicate that the step through height is an issue on his review of the E-fat Azteca and he is short at 5' 7", I think he once stated. Anyway, in time we'll get it figured out.
Addmotor just informed me that they have shipped me the M-360 so rather than discuss hypotheticals I'll have the real thing and I'll provide some details on its performance and measurements. Of course, for me, an important aspect of it --- how will it do in sand since the M-330 does nicely in soft and hard sand?
 
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#38
The Addmotor M-360 arrived a few days ago. It is about 76” long and 32” wide. The bar which you have to go over to sit on it is 26 inches as Rich C suggested. However, it is not at all a problem mounting the seat on the trike which I and Rich thought it might be. The seat is adjustable and it is a very nice seat with a back. It has a Shimano Altus derailleur with 7 speeds and PAS with 5 levels.

I have provided pictures of the unassembled trike in the box it arrived in and a picture of the assembled M-360. The M-360 came with some extras not mentioned on their site e.g. a loud horn which attaches to the front of the trike behind the front light both of which hook up to the M-360’s battery and are operated on the handlebar etc. This is aside from the bell switch on the left brake handle. There are two switches for high and low beam for the front light. It also has a rear light operated by the switch for the front light. It has top notch rear turn signals which you can operate from the handlebar. It has a button on the throttle to turn it on and off. It also has a “walk” mode.

The M-360 is a very powerful trike with a 48 volt 750W front wheel Bafang motor and using the throttle the front wheel will spin out until you get used to managing the throttle or starting out using the PAS while pedaling. I have already ridden the M-360 70 miles 25 of which were along the Atlantic Ocean beach. The M-360 plows through soft sand and travels well on hard sand. Because of the front fender the M-360 does not throw back sand on the rider. The beach always has some wind from the north or south but the M-360 handles it well even when it is fairly strong.

The M-360 is well made and an adventurous trike. The battery is turned on by the key which can be removed afterward for riding. There is a button on the battery to turn on or off the electronics after the key turns the battery on. The battery has excellent out of the way placement on the trike. Because of its design as a semi-recumbent it does take some time to get used to it but the ride with 4” X 20” Kenda Krusade tires is smooth even over rough terrain.
 

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#39
The Addmotor M-360 arrived a few days ago. It is about 76” long and 32” wide. The bar which you have to go over to sit on it is 26 inches as Rich C suggested. However, it is not at all a problem mounting the seat on the trike which I and Rich thought it might be. The seat is adjustable and it is a very nice seat with a back. It has a Shimano Altus derailleur with 7 speeds and PAS with 5 levels.

I have provided pictures of the unassembled trike in the box it arrived in and a picture of the assembled M-360. The M-360 came with some extras not mentioned on their site e.g. a loud horn which attaches to the front of the trike behind the front light both of which hook up to the M-360’s battery and are operated on the handlebar etc. This is aside from the bell switch on the left brake handle. There are two switches for high and low beam for the front light. It also has a rear light operated by the switch for the front light. It has top notch rear turn signals which you can operate from the handlebar. It has a button on the throttle to turn it on and off. It also has a “walk” mode.

The M-360 is a very powerful trike with a 48 volt 750W front wheel Bafang motor and using the throttle the front wheel will spin out until you get used to managing the throttle or starting out using the PAS while pedaling. I have already ridden the M-360 70 miles 25 of which were along the Atlantic Ocean beach. The M-360 plows through soft sand and travels well on hard sand. Because of the front fender the M-360 does not throw back sand on the rider. The beach always has some wind from the north or south but the M-360 handles it well even when it is fairly strong.

The M-360 is well made and an adventurous trike. The battery is turned on by the key which can be removed afterward for riding. There is a button on the battery to turn on or off the electronics after the key turns the battery on. The battery has excellent out of the way placement on the trike. Because of its design as a semi-recumbent it does take some time to get used to it but the ride with 4” X 20” Kenda Krusade tires is smooth even over rough terrain.
Thanks for your post. Since you’ve been riding electric trikes for awhile, do you notice any problems with them being “tippy” or unstable when riding normally?
 
#40
I really like the Addmotor M-360's ("chopper" as wrongly described by one poster) design..."
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Since I am the one poster who "wrongly described by one poster" the trike being a "chopper" design, I thought I would ask a question about the design of this trike:

Is the front wheel forward of the handlebars?

Here is the definition of a "chopper" from Merriam Webster:

": a customized motorcycle specifically : one that has the front wheel forward of the handlebars."

So ya, it is a chopper design trike. Not as radical as some, but nonetheless...

There ya go. No need to pick nits.
 
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