Chris Nolte

Well-Known Member
#1
We commonly discuss different types of lights available to connect to your ebike battery so I figured I would make a thread to discuss some of the brands that offer ebike lights as well as the different models available.

First it's helpful to understand how they work. Most ebike lighting systems run off of 6 Volts DC power. Ebike batteries are generally 24 volts, 36 volts or 48 volts. There are some other voltages, but these are the most common. It's important to note that electric bike lights run from DC power as opposed to AC power since there are lights that only run on AC power and will not work with your ebike. Dynamo hubs generate AC power to power lights and there are many lights made to work with these systems. For now I just want to focus on ebike lights though.

At the moment in the US there are several brands that make ebike lights, but this list is in no way exhaustive. Below are some brands that we have worked with in the past, feel free to add some others.

Busch & Müller - Made in Germany and we have found them to be of high quality. They are trusted by many major OEM's and also available as aftermarket upgrades. The German version of their site is more up to date including the new IQ-X model which is quite nice.

Light & Motion - US based light manufacturer producing lights for many different market sectors. They are well known in the bike industry for high power mountain bike lights. They recently introduced ebike lights to their offerings with 500 lumen, 800 lumen and 1200 lumen lights.

SON (Schmidt Original Nabendynamo) - Another German made light manufacturer with a focus on producing one of the best dynamos available they later introduced lights to pair with it and now have a DC version available for ebikes.

Supernova - Widely regarded as the gold standard in bike lighting. Manufactured in Germany of high quality materials, we have found these lights to be very reliable and they push the envelope on what's possible with bike lighting.

I want to highlight some products that are popular in our shop and on ebikes overall. Again this list is in no way exhaustive, but I figured it would be good to highlight some of the lights available from the different brands.


Busch & Müller IQ-X - A new introduction from B&M with a similar design to the classic Supernova Ebike light at a slightly lower price point. I think we're going to see this light a lot more in the near future. Currently there are a couple of Riese & Müller bikes that spec this light. (Note: their website doesn't show the ebike variety currently, but it is available)

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Busch & Müller Lumotec IQ2 eyc - Nice mid range ebike light at an affordable price.

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Light & Motion Nip & Tuck Set - Recently introduced. Comes standard with a 500 lumen headlight, but they have a 800 lumen version and a 1200 lumen headlight available.
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Supernova Ebike Light - Available with different mounting options for handlebars and forks. Most work with 6 volts, but they have some that will work with 12-60 volts if your system doesn't have a low voltage output and you want to connect directly to your battery.

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Supernova M99 - Available in three varieties M99 pure (6 volts 500 lumen low beam only), M99 pure+ (6 volts 1100 lumen low beam), M99 Pro (24v-60v 1100 lumen low beam, 1600 lumen high beam). This is the best ebike light on the market at the moment coming standard on many high quality bikes like the ST2S, Riese & Müller Delite GX and the Bulls Dail-E Grinder.

m99_pro_front_angle (1).jpg


Tail lights are a little simplier, but there are several varieties available. We mainly work with Busch & Müller and Supernova. The most recent development here is the integration of brake lights which we're starting to see with the Stromer ST2S and the Supernova Brakelight shown below.

8733.jpeg


Some other notes about ebike lights. Most new ebike systems have the ability to connect directly into the system and turn the lights on and off from the display. This includes Bosch, Shimano, most Brose systems, etc. If your system doesn't have a switch you'll need a light with a switch. Some ebike systems like the Bosch system require a lighting wire kit in order to connect to the motor system and some will require a dealer to activate the lights.

Feel free to post questions below or any of your own experiences with electric bike lights. I hope this will be helpful for those looking to add or upgrade the lights to their ebike.
 

Court

Administrator
Staff member
#2
Amazing post @Chris Nolte! Thanks for going so deep on this and even including models and pictures. I love the idea of integrated ebike lights, why not run off the main battery when you can? It's cool that they can be added post-purchase in some cases so people with a mountain bike style preference could still be safe in the city without the hassle of temporary lights :D
 

windmill

Active Member
#3
#4
Does anyone have the Supernova M99 Pro installed on their bike? If so I'd like to know your experience with the unit. Thank you.
 

Chris Nolte

Well-Known Member
#5
Does anyone have the Supernova M99 Pro installed on their bike? If so I'd like to know your experience with the unit. Thank you.
This light comes standard on the ST2 S which several forum members own and on the Riese & Müller Delite GX which is a little newer to the US and only a few own them in the US yet. Did you have any specific questions about the light? It's definitely one of the most refinied and powerful ebike light on the market.
 
#6
Thank you. I had been contacted by another member who has one on his ST2S. He said that the light is better than on his BMW motorcycle. I've race motorcycles all of my life so that was a good comparison. I am most interested in the light pattern it produces and IF anyone has installed a M99 on a Sduro rather than an Xduro. The Bosch set up is made to accept the M99 on the control panel mount whereas the Yamaha one does not. Spending over 500.00 USD plus mount, plus wiring harness for the Yamaha motor is no small expense. So not being able to actually 'see' one mounted and in darkness is why I've been asking around. Thank you.
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
#7
Thank you. I had been contacted by another member who has one on his ST2S. He said that the light is better than on his BMW motorcycle. I've race motorcycles all of my life so that was a good comparison. I am most interested in the light pattern it produces and IF anyone has installed a M99 on a Sduro rather than an Xduro. The Bosch set up is made to accept the M99 on the control panel mount whereas the Yamaha one does not. Spending over 500.00 USD plus mount, plus wiring harness for the Yamaha motor is no small expense. So not being able to actually 'see' one mounted and in darkness is why I've been asking around. Thank you.
Easiest way to get similar performance is to get one one of these.

https://www.amazon.com/Cygolite-TridenX-1300-Xtra-OSP/dp/B00E1NPTEE/

It puts out 1200+ lumens and I have a detailed video comparing this with the M99 pro in dark. I will post it soon.
 

Hugh

Active Member
#10
On my fatbike the BBSHD1000 watt mid drive has a plug coming out of the motor for I believe a 5 volt light. I just have not found a suitable candidate yet.
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
#11
Thank you. I had been contacted by another member who has one on his ST2S. He said that the light is better than on his BMW motorcycle. I've race motorcycles all of my life so that was a good comparison. I am most interested in the light pattern it produces and IF anyone has installed a M99 on a Sduro rather than an Xduro. The Bosch set up is made to accept the M99 on the control panel mount whereas the Yamaha one does not. Spending over 500.00 USD plus mount, plus wiring harness for the Yamaha motor is no small expense. So not being able to actually 'see' one mounted and in darkness is why I've been asking around. Thank you.
Hi Mark,

Yamaha PW system can't accept most of the M99 series. (M99 Pro or M99 Pure+) and it will take only M99 Pure which puts out only 500 lumens.
The new PW-X system can't even accept the M99 Pure. So, the latest 2017 systems can't accept any of the M99 series.

I have confirmed this with Supernova. The Yamaha system is not designed for such high power draw.

Your solution would be to try smaller lights like Supernova V521S or V6S.

http://supernova-lights.com/en/supernova-e3-e-bike-v6s
 

Lost

Active Member
#12
I have one of these on my Rad Rover. SUPER bright! I would say about the same as a car headlight. And cheap. It runs straight off the bikes battery (48 volts), and according to my meter draws about 11 watts. (advertised as 20, but hey EBAY)
Easy to mount on handle bars, and I soldered in place of the ridiculous light Rad Power uses. Took all of 10 minutes to install.
Did I mention it only costs $10??????????????
http://www.ebay.com/itm/301821806442?_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649&ssPageName=STRK:MEBIDX:IT
 

fxr3

Active Member
#16
I wanted a supernova m99 when I saw comparison to my st2 supernova. I emailed supernova and he replied

"From a technical side, it is not possible, I'm afraid". Ok.

I researched a little- bought a fenix bc30r and it has held up well. It displays battery time left in each of its 4 modes and It keeps up with the 28mph. Remembering to recharge is easy- plug in the bike, plug in the light. And a HUGE side benefit- it slips out of mount easily and is a killer flashlight.

It always bugged me they called my st2 light "super"nova after I saw the m99. That one deserves the "super" moniker.
 
#17
I have the Busch & Muller IQ-X E headlight, It works with 6V to 48V and draws 7w, its roughly equivalent to a 600 lumen light.
https://en.hollandbikeshop.com/bicy...r-lumotec-iq-x-e-led-headlight-150-lux-black/
For the tail light, Spanninga Elips tail light, 6V to 48V 1.5w, its large and bright.
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philips_lumiringkl.jpg
https://en.hollandbikeshop.com/bicycle-parts-electric-bicycle/e-bike-bicycle-lighting/e-bike-bicycle-rear-light/spanninga-elips-xe-rear-light-led-e-bike-80mm-red-461997/

Cost for the 2 lights with shipping is approximately $145.00 which is what most US retailers charge for the headlight alone without shipping. One must select USD, and United States in cart for accurate price without the 19% VAT.

Except for a couple of crimp connectors and a wire to the tail light they were plug-n-play on my Radwagons light circuit.
 
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JayVee

Well-Known Member
#18
I just bought a 45km/h Haibike Sduro Trekking. Due to regulatory issues in countries that are neighboring Switzerland (where I bought it), the bike was shipped in a configuration where the lights are always on (and you can't turn them off). This really annoys me because I have the impression that the lights are chewing away at my battery. So I conducted a little experiment in my kitchen: I left the bike on for 2 hours just to see how much 'juice' the lights would actually consume. I had to turn the bike back on about 35 times as it idles after a while and powers itself off. As it turns out, the lights being on permanently chews up about 1.5% of the battery per hour according to my estimates. And I didn't simulate the brake light which is also included (Busch & Müller Toplight Line E Brake). So the entire system probably consumes something like 2% per hour (500Wh battery).

I've come around to the idea that these lights are a safety feature and I can conceive that a 2% battery capacity per hour might be an acceptable trade off. But here's what really gets me: Haibike has also included a little light which illuminates the mandatory licence plate. Now that's what I call a total excess of zeal. Gee Haibike, thanks for illuminating my (potential) guilt. And by the way, it's not a Pontiac Firebird. It's an e-bike! :D


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#19
I used to work in the ebike industry. I found that lights that work off the battery generally are not that bright. I would suggest choose something with it's own battery scorce. I ended up buying a Lights and Motion Seca 2000. The ones that run off the bike batteries also require a special harness and some light cut and paste wiring connections. On early bikes it's extremely difficult to add without cut and paste with a custom setup with a switch. Hope that helps clarify some of the options avalible.