European travel with e bikes!

Tara D.

Active Member
What a great way to expose people to e bikes :) My mother in law recently took a vacation and did a bike tour, now I'll need to ask if it was on an E-bike!
 

irenewg13

Active Member
What a great way to expose people to e bikes :) My mother in law recently took a vacation and did a bike tour, now I'll need to ask if it was on an E-bike!
I will be receiving more info. It is with an organization named, Road Scholar !! I love that name ;)
 

Tara D.

Active Member
Road Scholar is a very cool program, have you checked out the Living and learning series? I would love to do something like that, but it will have to wait until the kids are grown!
 

irenewg13

Active Member
I just read about them, this morning. It sounds awesome, and my kids are grown.
Road Scholar is a very cool program, have you checked out the Living and learning series? I would love to do something like that, but it will have to wait until the kids are grown!
 

irenewg13

Active Member
Overheard us!
Thanks for the info.
What canton do you live in? You show pictures of mountains, and valleys.
It's pretty common


You mean I'm trustworthy? Thanks. :D

More seriously... One of the most popular routes in Switzerland is the Hertzroute or route 99. It crosses the heart of Switzerland from South to North, and can be done in about 2-3 days. Many people do it without any form of guide. All you need to do is rent an e-bike (in almost any major train station) and follow the official itineraries which are marked by specific road signs that direct you. Every so often, you will need to stop at a battery changing (as opposed to charging) station. You can swap your rented bike's battery for a new one there...

View attachment 4056

There are some pics here, although they failed to translate the website in English:

http://www.herzroute.ch/fr/la-galerie/images/

These bike itineraries are meant to keep you away from dangerous roads whenever possible. But you will often cover much more distance than if you had followed the main road. You can typically add an extra 40%. In others words, if it's 50 kilometers from A to B, you can expect to travel 70 kilometers to get there with one of these itineraries. The terrain may also be much more hilly. You will have to climb more hills than via the direct route. If you're in fairly good shape, and plan well, it shouldn't be an issue.
 

irenewg13

Active Member
C'est d'accord, je peux lire en francais.

It's pretty common


You mean I'm trustworthy? Thanks. :D

More seriously... One of the most popular routes in Switzerland is the Hertzroute or route 99. It crosses the heart of Switzerland from South to North, and can be done in about 2-3 days. Many people do it without any form of guide. All you need to do is rent an e-bike (in almost any major train station) and follow the official itineraries which are marked by specific road signs that direct you. Every so often, you will need to stop at a battery changing (as opposed to charging) station. You can swap your rented bike's battery for a new one there...

View attachment 4056

There are some pics here, although they failed to translate the website in English:

http://www.herzroute.ch/fr/la-galerie/images/

These bike itineraries are meant to keep you away from dangerous roads whenever possible. But you will often cover much more distance than if you had followed the main road. You can typically add an extra 40%. In others words, if it's 50 kilometers from A to B, you can expect to travel 70 kilometers to get there with one of these itineraries. The terrain may also be much more hilly. You will have to climb more hills than via the direct route. If you're in fairly good shape, and plan well, it shouldn't be an issue.
Overheard us!
Thanks for the info.
What canton do you live in? You show pictures of mountains, and valleys.