Explore E+ 3 Questions

Kevin Smith

New Member
That’s not very far for this bike but range is really dependant on how hard and fast you ride.

I have completed 50 mile rides and was a little conservative on power and had 30% left on the battery at the end. This weekend I rode a 30 mile fun ride and wasn’t at all conservative on using power and had 60% left.
 

Gator

Well-Known Member
I rented/test rode the Explore last Wednesday on a flat rail bed trail. The battery was at 85%. I rode 20 miles, clicking through gears and trying the different assist levels. When I returned the bike the battery was at 67%. It was a nice ride.
 

Barry S

Well-Known Member
Decided to test ride the Explore E+ 3 today to either keep it on the short list or cross it off. If you don't have time to read my experience, I'll just tell you it got crossed off. Things started off badly when I asked the salesperson if this would get my 200+ pound carcass up such-and-such Street. He knew where I was talking about and replied, "Yeah, I think it will do okay." Not a strong vote of confidence.

I then asked if they were able to work on the motor locally if I had any issues, and he looked over his shoulder at another salesperson and then replied, "Yeah, we can work on them." I made sure he understood what i was asking and said, "So, you don't have to ship them out and then I'm stuck without a bike until it gets back?" The second salesperson responded, "Well, we do ship them out but it's only to California so it's not that far." Remember, I'm in Hawaii which is like Mars for some people.

I decided to take it for a test ride anyway and the battery was dead. The salesperson was going to swap out the battery with the same model that was a Small frame size instead of Medium like I needed but the keys were missing to take the battery off. Another salesperson got involved, raised the seat on the Small and said, "This one will still give you the feel of what the bike can do." A quick top off of the tires, turned over my drivers license and credit card to the cashier, and I was out the door.

The bike looked and felt great and performed nicely on the flat paved bike path with the exception of a few clunks when shifting. There were no hills in the area so the salesman recommended I ride up their parking ramp. As I approached the ramp, I downshifted into a much easier gear and put the motor into Sport mode but I couldn't feel the motor helping at all. I double checked the settings while I continued to pedal, but as far as I'm concerned it was pure leg power that got me up. FAIL. I pushed the bike back into the store and explained that the motor just wasn't strong enough for me and the salesperson responded, "Yeah, you probably should go with the Quick E+."
 

Rakku

Active Member
As far as I know, here in germany no LBS works on Bosch or Yamaha motors on their own, they all get sent to the company.
LBS are specialists for bikes, not motors, therefore its logical that they outsource the job to the company they got the motors from.
 

Barry S

Well-Known Member
As far as I know, here in germany no LBS works on Bosch or Yamaha motors on their own, they all get sent to the company.
LBS are specialists for bikes, not motors, therefore its logical that they outsource the job to the company they got the motors from.
I was certain before I walked in that they were going to have to send the motor out. What really bugs me is that the sales staff were just pretending to know something about the 3 different ebike models concealed on the sales floor (2 Giants + 1 Tren folder) amongst the dozens of traditional bikes and sporting goods equipment that has been their bread and butter for decades. They know their stuff when it comes to traditional bikes and sporting goods equipment, just not ebikes. I'd rather a salesperson tell me he's not knowledgeable about a product I'm considering than nod his head and say, "Yeah, it'll do that."
 

Rakku

Active Member
Well, tbh I have yet to meet a salesman who really knows his stuff with ebikes.
Even the LBS I go doesnt really have experts on ebikes, I mean here what really happened once.

We went to test and buy a Haibike Sduro Trekking 4.0 for my father.
As meticulous as I am, I researched pretty much anything about that bike, so I was well informed.

The salesman didnt even know half about the bike and I had to complete the sentences of the salesman because he didnt really know or I had to correct him.

I wont blame him though, they have so many different models and new models come and go and its really hard to keep track off all of them.
But then again, I´d say over 70 - 80% of the people here active in this forum know way more about ebikes then salesmen in LBS actually selling the bikes.
 

MDMullins

New Member
Hi. I own the U.S. version of the Explore E +3. Did anyone come up with an answer to the original question: which rear rack will work with this bike? I don't see one listed on the Giant website that necessarily fits. I'm curious if anyone has found a good, compatible rack?
 

Howard carney

New Member
... for 100% asphalt , majority of it flat , the 5% grade for 1 mile , and a few minor blips , I would consider a geared rear hub .
For this type riding , I feel it blows the mid-drives away .
I thought the mid drives were superior to rear hubs on all terrains. Just more expensive. Still not sure which drive to go with. Howard