FASTROAD E+ EX PRO - 375Wh Battery?

I REALLY like this bike, but with a 375Wh battery on a Class 3 bike you pretty much have to buy the range extender, which defeats the purpose of having an in-tube battery.

They should have used the 500Wh battery. That is a really unfortunate engineering choice and probably takes the bike off my list.
 

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Mtl_Biker

Active Member
I REALLY like this bike, but with a 375Wh battery on a Class 3 bike you pretty much have to buy the range extender, which defeats the purpose of having an in-tube battery.

They should have used the 500Wh battery. That is a really unfortunate engineering choice and probably takes the bike off my list.
Couple of things.... First, what makes you think this is a Class 3 bike? I'm pretty sure it's Class 1. Just like the Explore E+1. Second, what kind of range do you need from your battery? I'd tried an Explore E+3 with 400Wh battery (that's pretty darn close to the 375) for a day to see how well it would work commuting. I did my 60km round trip with it just fine, with about 20% remaining at the end. (That's close to 40 miles.) I ended up with a model with 500Wh battery and even with the highest assist level I am able to commute both ways without any problem. But I did feel there wasn't enough reserve to allow me to use the bike during the day for errands and still make it back home at the end of the day, so I bought a second charger ($150) to keep at the office.

Don't forget that this model has the newer 6-sensor technology and probably other improvements to make it more efficient. I have no doubt that it would be able to do my full commute, even with the 375 battery. And the advantage of it is that it is certainly a lighter bike which is not something to overlook. I have a really hard time lifting my bike up onto my bike rack (I'm old!) and this one is lighter for sure.
 
It's definitely Class 3 - 28MPH. I wouldn't consider it otherwise.

I should have said many people would need the 250Wh extender. I had a Juiced CCS with 615Wh, and a Haibike FullNine with 500Wh (a mountain bike I primarily rode on the street). Both of those bikes had similar range because the Haibike was lighter and more efficient. On faster 25-mile rides I would come back around 30% on either bike.

Once you get over 20MPH you really start eating up your battery. So, for me, I have to have at least 500Wh, and I would like much more.

 

Mtl_Biker

Active Member
It's definitely Class 3 - 28MPH. I wouldn't consider it otherwise.

I should have said many people would need the 250Wh extender. I had a Juiced CCS with 615Wh, and a Haibike FullNine with 500Wh (a mountain bike I primarily rode on the street). Both of those bikes had similar range because the Haibike was lighter and more efficient. On faster 25-mile rides I would come back around 30% on either bike.

Once you get over 20MPH you really start eating up your battery. So, for me, I have to have at least 500Wh, and I would like much more.

Quite a collection of bikes you had/have! Are you adding to your collection or replacing what you have?

I'd love to get a Class 3 bike (I'm seriously looking at getting a speed limit removing device for my Explore E+1 because I'm constantly pedaling faster than the motor supplies assist). Can you point to anything, anywhere that confirms that bike is Class 3? Why wouldn't Giant say so on the bike specs description on their websites? This is certainly something that would help them sell that bike. I certainly would have considered that model when I found out about it, but thought overall the Explore E+1 was a better choice for me. But Class 3 would have made the difference.

I wonder what the range of that bike would be with 375Wh battery. Maybe for regular shorter rides there's an advantage to having a lighter bike. And add the booster only when needed.
 

BCrider

New Member
Totally agree with the battery being way too small. At this point 500Wh is pretty much the baseline standard.
 
Yes, it says 28mph right in the link I posted, and also on the page the link points to.

I moved to an area that is not great for biking, and for a lot of my rides I transport my bike. I sold the Haibike because it was difficult to carry, and I am really kicking myself now because I have a new SUV with a Thule T2 Pro XT hitch rack, which can carry bikes up to 60lbs. So, back to shopping.

Certainly 375Wh would work for short rides like commuting close in the city, but I don't see that range working for most people who would buy this bike.

And what could possibly be the reason? There has to be enough room for the 500Wh to fit. Craziness...
 

Mtl_Biker

Active Member
Yes, it says 28mph right in the link I posted, and also on the page the link points to.

I moved to an area that is not great for biking, and for a lot of my rides I transport my bike. I sold the Haibike because it was difficult to carry, and I am really kicking myself now because I have a new SUV with a Thule T2 Pro XT hitch rack, which can carry bikes up to 60lbs. So, back to shopping.

Certainly 375Wh would work for short rides like commuting close in the city, but I don't see that range working for most people who would buy this bike.

And what could possibly be the reason? There has to be enough room for the 500Wh to fit. Craziness...
That link doesn't work. It didn't work when you posted it and it's not working now. It gives a 404 not found error. So that's why I went to the official Giant US (and then Canada) sites and it says nothing at all about the speed or class of that or any model. Strange.

One reason could be weight savings and the other could be a new profit center for Giant. :) And really, a great many people buying such bikes wouldn't be (often) riding greater distances than about 25 miles. (My opinion.) I commute a greater distance and like you, often go for long rides. So for me I'd want 500Wh or the booster pack battery. I'd love to see what the bike looks like with the add on battery... the nice looks might be totally destroyed.
 

MattsQuickE

New Member
I use my 2019 quickie to deliver. Never go above normal mode. Usually eco or eco plus. Do about 30 miles a night with about 50% left when I’m done. I think 375 would be fine on a lighter bike with more efficient technology. Seeing as this bike is very similar to mine, I could see being confident to go out for a while on it. I’m pretty sure giant knows what they’re doing.
 

new_ebiker

New Member
I use my 2019 quickie to deliver. Never go above normal mode. Usually eco or eco plus. Do about 30 miles a night with about 50% left when I’m done. I think 375 would be fine on a lighter bike with more efficient technology. Seeing as this bike is very similar to mine, I could see being confident to go out for a while on it. I’m pretty sure giant knows what they’re doing.
same, i find normal is plenty of power. I tuned eco to 70% assist via the app, and I stay in eco 90% of time. My battery is usually at 48% when I get home from work, the round trip is around 48KM
 

MattsQuickE

New Member
Can you explain the app? I’m in North America and I haven’t seen any app. I’m not on the ride one system though. Apps for both systems? What’s it called?
 
Yeah, clearly the target market for this bike is not people who want to ride distance at higher speeds. Which is a shame since the bike seems perfectly suited for that purpose.

With a 500Wh battery and the option for 750Wh when you need it, it would have been a nice, lower cost option to Stromer (which is what it looks like a copy of, that and the Raleigh).

There are a lot of people on this forum who commute 20-30 miles each way. I know I'm not the only person who won't buy a bike with significantly less range than the current minimum standard. So, maybe they know what they're doing, but to me this was a mistake.

For $700 more the Trek Allant 8s has a 625 Wh in-tube battery. THAT is awesome.
 

roguex

Member
Yeah, clearly the target market for this bike is not people who want to ride distance at higher speeds. Which is a shame since the bike seems perfectly suited for that purpose.

With a 500Wh battery and the option for 750Wh when you need it, it would have been a nice, lower cost option to Stromer (which is what it looks like a copy of, that and the Raleigh).

There are a lot of people on this forum who commute 20-30 miles each way. I know I'm not the only person who won't buy a bike with significantly less range than the current minimum standard. So, maybe they know what they're doing, but to me this was a mistake.

For $700 more the Trek Allant 8s has a 625 Wh in-tube battery. THAT is awesome.
Yeah I saw the new giant and thought wow that looks nice (an update to my 2019 quick e+) Then I saw the battery and the price! They increased the price by 45% from the 2019 quck e+ to the new fastroad e+ ex pro where i'm from. It's an 83% increase if I use the price I paid for my quick e+ and they reduced the battery capacity by 33%!

Even with a new motor I don't think it's worth that much more over the older quick e.

The Trek Allant 8s on the other hand looks nice, same price as the giant where i'm from but it comes with a 625wh battery already integrated, it also has the range extender option but its 500wh instead of the 250wh on the giant.
 

MattsQuickE

New Member
Yeah I saw the new giant and thought wow that looks nice (an update to my 2019 quick e+) Then I saw the battery and the price! They increased the price by 45% from the 2019 quck e+ to the new fastroad e+ ex pro where i'm from. It's an 83% increase if I use the price I paid for my quick e+ and they reduced the battery capacity by 33%!

Even with a new motor I don't think it's worth that much more over the older quick e.

The Trek Allant 8s on the other hand looks nice, same price as the giant where i'm from but it comes with a 625wh battery already integrated, it also has the range extender option but its 500wh instead of the 250wh on the giant.
Allant 8s is 1300 usd more than my quick e and you have to use your phone as the the display? Not sure what all the fuss is about. Who wants to ride more than 60 miles between charges?
 

2019QuickE

New Member
I agree. I don’t know what Giant are smoking bringing this to the Australian market. I get that our currency has depreciated a fair bit, but the retail price for the Fastroad E+ EX Pro, which is the 2020 replacement for the Quick E+ is AUD5,499. The 2019 Quick E+ retailed at AUD3,799 but was generally available discounted for AUD3,000.
I really like my Quick E+ 2019, but that pricing is crazy given the smaller battery, I mean sure you get Tiagra, but that’s about it. The Gazelle Cityzen T10 is generally available for AUD4,000. The Specialized Turbo Vado is only AUD4,500, both of which have way bigger batteries.

I predict they will sell precisely none of these Fastroads at that price in Australia.
 
Allant 8s is 1300 usd more than my quick e and you have to use your phone as the the display? Not sure what all the fuss is about. Who wants to ride more than 60 miles between charges?
My fault, the Trek is $800 more. $3500-$4299. I could never get 60 miles out of 375Wh. At 22-23 MPH I wouldn't get 25 miles, particularly not on a windy round trip.
 

Captain Slow

Active Member
fwiw - I think they designed the new 2020 Road E+ with the 375 Wh battery which is competitive with other road ebikes like the Orbea Gain and the Specialized Creo. For that type of bike the reduced weight and how it's used means it's probably enough for what that type of buyer wants. The mistake they made was using that same form factor in a more commuter type of bike where the typical purchaser wants a higher assist level and where the bike is heavier.

Mtl Biker, do you have any sense as to how much lighter the bike is with the 375 Wh battery vs. the 500 Wh battery?
 

Mtl_Biker

Active Member
fwiw - I think they designed the new 2020 Road E+ with the 375 Wh battery which is competitive with other road ebikes like the Orbea Gain and the Specialized Creo. For that type of bike the reduced weight and how it's used means it's probably enough for what that type of buyer wants. The mistake they made was using that same form factor in a more commuter type of bike where the typical purchaser wants a higher assist level and where the bike is heavier.

Mtl Biker, do you have any sense as to how much lighter the bike is with the 375 Wh battery vs. the 500 Wh battery?
No idea really, but all it would take is a visit to a Giant dealer to hold the 400Wh and 500Wh batteries and compare. When I borrowed an Explore E+3 for a day (400Wh) I was able to lift it onto my bike rack without too much difficulty, but my E+1 is a LOT heavier. But it also has the fenders, lights and rack that the E+3 doesn't. So it's hard to tell how much difference the battery itself makes.