FEWER flat tires please!

steve mercier

Well-Known Member
Blackberrys are deliciuos. I’ll make me blackberry jam toast right away.:)
Was it hard getting armour and tube into tire and tire back on the rim?[/QUOTP The LBS store did it for her. It took them about 10 mins. You would need to order the correct size insert and it might have to be trimmed with scissors depending on your tire size . Also you will be running a smaller tube. Her bike has 2.35" tires but now has a 1.9" tube. There is a 7 year replacement warranty on the product. I plan to install them in my tires when I get a flat. I guess that is like closing the barn door after the horse has escaped. The interesting thing is feel. It is supple yet firm at lower pressure. I normally pump the tires between 30-40 psi but with these you can run at 20 psi and it feels really good.
 

DaveMatthews

Well-Known Member

steve mercier

Well-Known Member
How does the extra weight in the wheels affect the ride? And range?
Both seem negligible. I carry a spare battery for each of us on most rides but my wife seldom needs the second battery and I usually do. We have the identical tires but she weighs less than me so she gets about 12 % more range than I do anyways. I will continue to play with the tire pressures to get the perfect balance but I will know more when I put them in my bike and ride them every day.
 
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Alex M

Active Member
How firm is this foam "armor"? I have some very hard thorns on fallen branches of some shrubs, they are hard enough to puncture through my foam clogs-sandals.
 

steve mercier

Well-Known Member
It is softer than a kevlar or nylon shield but it is much thicker. The advantage is that the tire is not losing any performance and you get more flat protection. I am sure that if you rode through enough vines eventually you would get a flat. Like the chaos theory in Jurassic park ...." life finds a way" (-:
 

Pragmatic

Member
I looked at the Tannus Armour UK site mentioned above and it looks like FTB/e-FTB sized tires are not presently in the product mix... just the more common MTB tire sizes (or tyres as the Brits say). We still have some pedal MTBs... so Tannus Armour is a possible future option. For our FTBs, we'll have to hope our Mr. Tuffy liners are somewhat effective.

Also like steve mercier 's ...new the EBR ending to an old prayer: ....let us not run out of power and deliver us from flats, Amen. Or ....Lead us not into broken glass and deliver us from bike thieves, Amen

And I agree with several folks we hate goat heads. A friend's acreage in Texas has a horrible problem with goat heads...


...Ride On!
 

Pragmatic

Member
Ride in someone else's tire tracks
LoL! As in let them be the thorn/goathead/glass/nail/screw magnet/sponge.

The weirdest thing I ever got in a vehicle tire was a complete screwdriver shaft (sans plastic handle). These days, plenty of hardened steel drywall screws...

Bike tire problems were mostly glass fragments, thorns, and goat heads... and sharp-rock sidewall slashes.
 

DouglasB

Active Member
Back in the day we had a simple device for road bikes that was a piece of stiff wire that was formed to rub over the surface of your tire tread and knock off any debris. It mounted to the brake bolt and was constantly in contact with the tire tread. Being just a piece of wire, it offered little to no resistance. It was also considered good form, after passing through a rough patch of gravel or glass, to place your gloved hand on the tire and knock off any debris. That's how we did it when I was a young man.
 

Pragmatic

Member
Back in the day we had a simple device for road bikes that was a piece of stiff wire that was formed to rub over the surface of your tire tread and knock off any debris. It mounted to the brake bolt and was constantly in contact with the tire tread. Being just a piece of wire, it offered little to no resistance. It was also considered good form, after passing through a rough patch of gravel or glass, to place your gloved hand on the tire and knock off any debris. That's how we did it when I was a young man.
@DouglasB -Yes! I have those on my old Nishiki road bike, they bolt to the caliper bolt and have clear vinyl tubing for flex and tension and you could bend the wire to fit the contour for your nearly-smooth HP road tires. They were great for wiping off clinging thorns and glass etc. before the next revolution woud drive then deep into the tire/tube. Some folks call them tire savers or flat stoppers. They still sell them as "tire wipers" here. $18.

With the advent of disk brakes I don't know if there are still mounting holes on bike rear frames or front forks any more. And the savers/stoppers would not work so well/be noisy with knobby tires on MTBs FTBs... We have everything from old-but-nice road bikes to full-suspension MTBs, to e-FTBs... times and technologies sure change be it vehicles, bikes, or computers, etc. As you know, if you make it to seniorhood you've probably seen it all... ...Ride On!

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FlatSix911

Member
Back in the day we had a simple device for road bikes that was a piece of stiff wire that was formed to rub over the surface of your tire tread and knock off any debris. It mounted to the brake bolt and was constantly in contact with the tire tread. Being just a piece of wire, it offered little to no resistance. It was also considered good form, after passing through a rough patch of gravel or glass, to place your gloved hand on the tire and knock off any debris. That's how we did it when I was a young man.
@DouglasB -Yes! I have those on my old Nishiki road bike, they bolt to the caliper bolt and have clear vinyl tubing for flex and tension and you could bend the wire to fit the contour for your nearly-smooth HP road tires. Some folks call them tire savers or flat stoppers. They still sell them here. $18.

With the advent of disk brakes I don't know if there are still mounting holes on bike rear frames or front forks any more. And the savers/stoppers would not work so well/be noisy with knobby tires on MTBs FTBs... We have everything from old-but-nice road bikes to full-suspension MTBs, to e-FTBs... times and technologies sure change be it vehicles, bikes, or computers, etc. As you know, if you make it to seniorhood you've probably seen it all... ...Ride On!
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Glad to see that these are still available... very old school, but effective!
 

DouglasB

Active Member
Glad to see that these are still available... very old school, but effective!
Thanks for digging up that information. I often wondered if thy actually worked or were similar to deer whistles that you put on your car's fender to frighten deer away? Some scintific reaserch is in order. The deer whistles turned out to be bogus.
 

Pragmatic

Member
Thanks for digging up that information. I often wondered if thy actually worked or were similar to deer whistles that you put on your car's fender to frighten deer away? Some scientific research is in order. The deer whistles turned out to be bogus.
@DouglasB Your skepticism is of course reasonable. They worked really well for us on the road bikes with HP tires.

Basically from our years of practical experience (not scientific research) is - what happens with thorns and glass and sharp grit without a tire saver/wiper is - the tire initially picks up the thorn or glass sliver on first contact and typically with forward wheel motion (rotation) rotates through to the next rotation or rotations, combined with the weight on the bike, which then "drives home" the thorn or glass/metal fragment deeper into the tire tread and or inner tube. Road bike tires are pretty thin so it only takes a rotation or two to puncture the inner tube then you had a leak to repair or if a bigger cut, a blowout. The tire saver/wiper basically flicks off the threat before it can be driven home/deeper on subsequent rotations.

With tire savers/wipers the thorn/glass/metal/sand/grit fragment on the tire surface is wiped/flicked off and taken away with the air flow and falls back to the road surface becoming a threat to follow-on tires. Note: a few thorns or glass fragments if positioned correctly (in a bad way) of course may enter the tire and tube deeply on first contact, and those will result in a required flat repair, but in our experience that was a rare occurrence. We later added Mr. Tuffy tire protector liners in the tires as extra insurance beyond just the tire savers/wipers, with a slight weight penalty, and had never had a flat on the road.

We'd give these tire savers/wipers a shot on MTBs or FTBs but realistically the knobby tire treads are NOT fully compatible with these tire savers/wipers so we use Mr. Tuffy tire protector liners on MTBs FTBs. Repairing flats or changing inner tubes roadside, or in the shop, is not what I consider fun (especially if it's raining). You do repairs when you must, but we'd rather avoid repairs entirely if possible.

Some addl. observations: while riding, when you look slightly askew and down from the handlebar neck/stem and watch the tire saver/wiper and the tire, you can watch the dynamics of this wiping action happening on the top of the tire in front of you. Back at home/in the shop, you can actually inspect/see the wear on the wiper's wire-to-tire contact surface after many miles/years of use (the wire is polished, shiny, and ever-so-slightly thinner). The drag if of course tiny/almost immeasurable.

...Ride On!

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