Gas powered electric bike... would it be legal??

Diesel / electric locomotives have been using this principle for many years. The reason here is, an electric motor is easier to control than the massive mechanical clutch and transmission that would be required to handle the immense load of a freight train.
Just to give a better reason: Diesel-electric locomotives were introduced because of the massive torque the electric motor can give. The same reason for which we can enjoy e-MTBs today :) Funny thing though is nobody managed to make regenerative braking of diesel-electric locomotives and all energy generated during braking with motors/generators is dissipated in huge resistors of the locomotive.

Regarding the idea of the OP: I can see a viable way to generate electricity from fuel in quiet and clean way: the fuel cell. I only cannot tell how big and expensive such generator could be. (Fuel cells typically run on hydrogen and oxygen, which is ecologically sound).
 

slayer1962

New Member
You do realize where most electric comes from right? we burn coal or oil to make electric. I am all for electric vehicles but wind and solar are not perfected yet so my bicycle gets charged with fossil fuel one way or another in my area. To me the advantage is its quiet and odor free when riding the bicycle
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
Anything is possible but sometimes not practical.

I am going to go out on a limb to say that the average daily useage of an eBike once they get established in our society will be less than 10 miles (16km). At this time and well into the past history of eBikes here in the US there have been all sorts of contraptions made up to regenerate electricity as a range extender. The only one that has impressed me is the one that Justin LeMere of Grin Technology built and rode last year but it was for a very specific purpose and a proof of concept carried out by some very savvy individuals that looked like a once in a lifetime adventure.

So I wonder to what end the average rider would ever need to add the weight and complexity of any sort of regen system such as a generator or even a solar panel? Access to a plug in receptacle anywhere in the US, outside of the obvious, is pretty easy so there really is no big deal in carrying your charger and taking a long break if necessary to up the Ah's. In fact at the level of prediction a very small battery would be all that is necessary for most applications. Of course there are those that will require more wh's and they seem to be the focus at this time by the manufacturers vis a vis going from 500wh's to 700wh's and offering what it thinks the current bikers want.
I'd go out on a limb to say when the boomers all die off, eBikes will certainly level off, if not drop in popularity in America. I certainly agree it will be a minuscule percentage of riders going for long distance across America. But you know if I was riding across a couple states, I'd think a little generator on a trailer would be pretty handy. It would reduce my range anxiety on battery levels on all my gadgets.
 
You do realize where most electric comes from right? we burn coal or oil to make electric.
Or from nuclear powerplants. Which, in my opinion, are the best energy source.
Regarding conventional powerplants, the benefit is the emissions are controllable there.
 

slayer1962

New Member
It seems people are against the nuclear power plants in NJ they just shut down Forked River NJ plant because they wanted millions in upgrades to keep it open. I agree with you and would hope they make it safe and more common in the future
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
It's not the nuclear plants I worry about, it's the transportation and storage of the waste.
 

AlanDB

Well-Known Member
It's not the nuclear plants I worry about, it's the transportation and storage of the waste.
I hear you. They are decommissioning our local 45 YO nuclear power plant (only one in my state) in 2020 and passing the cost of protecting and managing that vacated site for who knows how many decades to "guess who".
 
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It's not the nuclear plants I worry about, it's the transportation and storage of the waste.
That is mostly a political problem.

Fare more radioactive waste escapes into the environment from burning coal than from nuclear power, 100x for the same amount of energy according to https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/coal-ash-is-more-radioactive-than-nuclear-waste/. Yet, the radioactive waste of coal is so small compared to the total waste that no-one worries about it. Nuclear power is extremely clean by comparison; it is one of our cleanest energy sources.
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Nuclear power is extremely clean by comparison; it is one of our cleanest energy sources.
While this is true, no one wants to assume the risk of another Chernobyl. The Three Mile Island nuclear plant here in Pennsylvania, the site of the worst nuclear accident on US soil, is also in the process of being decommissioned.
 

Thomas Jaszewski

Well-Known Member
While this is true, no one wants to assume the risk of another Chernobyl. The Three Mile Island nuclear plant here in Pennsylvania, the site of the worst nuclear accident on US soil, is also in the process of being decommissioned.
Or the “screw Nevada Bill” and waste storage issues.

Coal waste is seldom addressed. But in places where it’s used in concrete we’re seeing the severe spalling and failures due to heavy metals concentration. The easy answers aren’t considered in the current toxic conversations and denial of the effects of oil, coal, and nuclear. Fortunately we have a progressive power company, decommissioning coal and build more sustainable sources.

weve been watching giant blades shipped by barge up the Mississippi.
 

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bob armani

Well-Known Member
Interesting concept, however, it seems to defeat the whole purpose of owning and operating an E-bike on any level. Just too clunky for me IMO!
 
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bob armani

Well-Known Member
I'd go out on a limb to say when the boomers all die off, eBikes will certainly level off, if not drop in popularity in America. I certainly agree it will be a minuscule percentage of riders going for long distance across America. But you know if I was riding across a couple states, I'd think a little generator on a trailer would be pretty handy. It would reduce my range anxiety on battery levels on all my gadgets.
I agree, putting this guys 20lb generator in a bike trailer makes a nice addition to any bike packing/trekking experience.
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
That is mostly a political problem.

Fare more radioactive waste escapes into the environment from burning coal than from nuclear power, 100x for the same amount of energy according to https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/coal-ash-is-more-radioactive-than-nuclear-waste/. Yet, the radioactive waste of coal is so small compared to the total waste that no-one worries about it. Nuclear power is extremely clean by comparison; it is one of our cleanest energy sources.
You don't think storing something for 1,000 years is an issue?
 
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rich c

Well-Known Member
Or the “screw Nevada Bill” and waste storage issues.

Coal waste is seldom addressed. But in places where it’s used in concrete we’re seeing the severe spalling and failures due to heavy metals concentration. The easy answers aren’t considered in the current toxic conversations and denial of the effects of oil, coal, and nuclear. Fortunately we have a progressive power company, decommissioning coal and build more sustainable sources.

weve been watching giant blades shipped by barge up the Mississippi.
Even wind turbines have a disposal issue when the blades reach end of life. At least they aren't toxic! https://www.oilandgas360.com/wind-turbine-blades-being-disposed-of-in-casper-landfill/