Haibike SDuro FullNine - 2+ months later

#1
After waiting ... and waiting ... aaaaandd WAITING .... for a Rip Current S for months, I had decided it was time to broaden the horizon and maybe consider something a little different than a fatty for my fist ebike, so I posted this thread and got some great advice from Ravi. I purchased the bike and received it the first week of June, and quickly started adding components to make it more comfy and practical to ride anytime, anywhere. First item to address is always the seat, so a Serfas Dual Density was purchased:


Ugghh, photobombed by my Boxer, Mugsy !! He doesn't share my enthusiasm for Dad's new toy, he just likes to be the center of attention. OK, where was I ?? Ohh, next was a water bottle holder to provide some very important liquid refreshment for a ride. If there is anything to ding Haibike for, it's the lack of any bosses to mount either a bottle, lock, air pump .. numerous accessories that you will NEED to carry, but you need to be creative if you buy a Haibike. I chose a Bushwhacker Shasta for its smaller size and it is ideal for location, right at your stem for easy access.


Next on the list was a cheap stem bag from Target, which provides a place to store tools, patch kit, keys and all those miscellaneous items that are needed at some point if you ride enough.


I had the opportunity to do a moonlight ride in June, and of course did not have a light, so what I wanted from a light was the ability to plug it into the micro USB port on the Yamaha's controller so that the main battery would charge the light. This one was a 700w x 2 setup, and it did a very good hob lighting up the trail without being obnoxious - just remember to point it down maybe 20 feet ahead of you on the trail, rather than level and shining a hundred feet ahead and blinding riders coming at you.


Last item on my list was the Ergo G5 grips, which I debated over for a while. I wasn't sure I would like them, but I found the more I rode, the more my wrists and fingertips would bother me, so going to a better grip that allows three different hand positions was an overall good option to have. This is a lousy view of the grips and doesn't show how the bend upwards, but after using them for a month, I can recommend them.

So in conclusion, over 2 months into owning it with almost 300 miles on it, and I am very pleased with its performance. I did not mention performance until now, but I got quickly annoyed with the Yamaha cuting out at 20mph, so I added the Bikespeed RS to power through the long straight stretches of rail trail that I ride, and while it just KILLS the battery, it does what I want it to and allows me to maintain a pace of around 22-23mph which is just faster enough to justify its purchase.

I already mentioned the cons for the bike - the lack of bottle bosses and the 20mph cutout, but those can both be addressed. Looking back, I'm kinda glad I did not purchase the Rip Current S - while it would definitely draw a crowd and start plenty of conversation, it just wasn't the best tool for the job, and the 29" ride on the Haibike just excels at eating up the miles with not much effort - it really is a nice offroad cruiser that provides a comfortable ride and I look forward to riding it as much as I can.

SerfasDualDensity.jpg BushwhackerShasta.jpg StemBag.jpg Supfire x2700.jpg ErgoG5Grips.jpg SDuroFullNine.jpg
 
#3
So good to see you enjoying the bike! It's a drag though, that I'm not the fastest guy in the group anymore:p
Yes, but more importantly you have me beat on range by a crap-ton with your triple batteries setup. I'd wager if we start a poll to see if highest speed or longest range is preferred, 80% will vote for longest range. Next month's ride on the C&O will quickly make that abundantly clear.
 

Brooks

New Member
#4
Hey. I bought the same Full Nine 6.0 last January. I really like the bike. White is my favorite color for a bike.
Haven't considered a chip. I am happy it shuts down at 20mph, as it saves the battery.
But I got to tell you.... it's a fast lonely existence..... nobody wants to ride with me. I need to find my own kind now.
 
#5
I was sure I could go a year after buying it before I splurged on the chip. I told my riding buddies I could and would wait ... no need to void the warranty for one thing, and no need to ride 20+ on the trails I ride. I knew that my ODO and speedo would be wrong as well, and I guess I talked myself into that annoying me more than it should. I wanted my ODO and speedo to be accurate, as it is an important consideration for maintenance, but there are a lot of long, straight sections of the trail I ride, and frequently there is NO ONE even in sight, so I kick it up to 24 and put some miles on it. I make it a point to not pass anyone faster than 14, which is my normal speed on my regular bike.

You are completely accurate in the battery drain comment .. it just KILLS the battery to ride at a sustained 20+. My range drops to around 35-40 miles if I try to sustain a 20+ average on a ride.
 

JayVee

Well-Known Member
#6
Congrats on the bike. Lucky you with that range. I have the 28mph EU PW-45, and a typical range for 80% of the battery is 42-44 kilometers. That’s having slowed down considerably. At full speed, I don’t think I’d get 30 kilometers (still 80% of the battery). The always hilly terrain, wind, and rider weight (220 pounds) play an important part in draining the battery. And then there’s the always on lights (because of EU regs). The lights drain 2% of the battery per hour according to my kitchen tests.

IMO it’s better to have a chipped bike than an official solution. The official solution cuts off at 42.5 km/h. It’s frankly annoying when you’re going downhill and need to outrun cars on a narrow street. They try overtakes in the sillyest possible places.
 

bob armani

Well-Known Member
#7
I was sure I could go a year after buying it before I splurged on the chip. I told my riding buddies I could and would wait ... no need to void the warranty for one thing, and no need to ride 20+ on the trails I ride. I knew that my ODO and speedo would be wrong as well, and I guess I talked myself into that annoying me more than it should. I wanted my ODO and speedo to be accurate, as it is an important consideration for maintenance, but there are a lot of long, straight sections of the trail I ride, and frequently there is NO ONE even in sight, so I kick it up to 24 and put some miles on it. I make it a point to not pass anyone faster than 14, which is my normal speed on my regular bike.

You are completely accurate in the battery drain comment .. it just KILLS the battery to ride at a sustained 20+. My range drops to around 35-40 miles if I try to sustain a 20+ average on a ride.
I hear ya! I am too addicted to higher speeds throughout most of my ride. My 2015 Evo Jet is not chipped and the rear hub is tuned in such a way that 23 mph is a norm for that bike with very little output by the rider. I am sure the less rolling resistance from the 700c tires contribute to that maintained speed. The bike is a solid performer.

BTW-Like the way you accessorized your bike. A nice setup with the very comfy looking saddle. Probably my next upgrade to be paired with my newly purchased suspension post.
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
#8
Very nice!
Looks like you have a great setup. I really enjoy the smoothness of Yamaha. Their PW-X is even better. Are you sure you have dialed the seat height, reach for your height? I expected the seat to be slightly higher. Once you get the fit right, the bike fits like a glove and you would forget it's presence thanks to those shocks.
I'm glad you didn't put that God awful cloud 9 seat! Everytime I see that cushy cloud 9 seat on a nice eMTB, I say to myself "Jesus just died again.."

If you plan on riding in the urban concrete jungle, then investing on some nice ABUS locks would be a good idea.
 
#9
@JayVee - Best thing about a chipped bike is it still appears to remain a Class 1 bike, and the chip is easily disabled via 4 button presses if you want to let an inexperienced rider try it out.

@bob armani - Accessories are what make it yours. I hope I don't sound like I am pushing any of my choices on a buyer looking to buy, but I did buy what felt were quality additions at budget prices.

@Ravi Kempaiah - I want to thank you again for your recommendation. I really would have never chosen this as 'the ebike' for me, but the more I ride it, the happier I am with the purchase. Nice catch on the seat height ! I had offered my neighbor a ride and neglected to raise the seat after he hopped off. It currently sits about 4" higher than the picture I added. An Abus 6500 is on my wish list for this winter, as well as an Ibera rear rack and bag for a planned trip on the C&O in September.
 
#13
After waiting ... and waiting ... aaaaandd WAITING .... for a Rip Current S for months, I had decided it was time to broaden the horizon and maybe consider something a little different than a fatty for my fist ebike, so I posted this thread and got some great advice from Ravi. I purchased the bike and received it the first week of June, and quickly started adding components to make it more comfy and practical to ride anytime, anywhere. First item to address is always the seat, so a Serfas Dual Density was purchased:


Ugghh, photobombed by my Boxer, Mugsy !! He doesn't share my enthusiasm for Dad's new toy, he just likes to be the center of attention. OK, where was I ?? Ohh, next was a water bottle holder to provide some very important liquid refreshment for a ride. If there is anything to ding Haibike for, it's the lack of any bosses to mount either a bottle, lock, air pump .. numerous accessories that you will NEED to carry, but you need to be creative if you buy a Haibike. I chose a Bushwhacker Shasta for its smaller size and it is ideal for location, right at your stem for easy access.


Next on the list was a cheap stem bag from Target, which provides a place to store tools, patch kit, keys and all those miscellaneous items that are needed at some point if you ride enough.


I had the opportunity to do a moonlight ride in June, and of course did not have a light, so what I wanted from a light was the ability to plug it into the micro USB port on the Yamaha's controller so that the main battery would charge the light. This one was a 700w x 2 setup, and it did a very good hob lighting up the trail without being obnoxious - just remember to point it down maybe 20 feet ahead of you on the trail, rather than level and shining a hundred feet ahead and blinding riders coming at you.


Last item on my list was the Ergo G5 grips, which I debated over for a while. I wasn't sure I would like them, but I found the more I rode, the more my wrists and fingertips would bother me, so going to a better grip that allows three different hand positions was an overall good option to have. This is a lousy view of the grips and doesn't show how the bend upwards, but after using them for a month, I can recommend them.

So in conclusion, over 2 months into owning it with almost 300 miles on it, and I am very pleased with its performance. I did not mention performance until now, but I got quickly annoyed with the Yamaha cuting out at 20mph, so I added the Bikespeed RS to power through the long straight stretches of rail trail that I ride, and while it just KILLS the battery, it does what I want it to and allows me to maintain a pace of around 22-23mph which is just faster enough to justify its purchase.

I already mentioned the cons for the bike - the lack of bottle bosses and the 20mph cutout, but those can both be addressed. Looking back, I'm kinda glad I did not purchase the Rip Current S - while it would definitely draw a crowd and start plenty of conversation, it just wasn't the best tool for the job, and the 29" ride on the Haibike just excels at eating up the miles with not much effort - it really is a nice offroad cruiser that provides a comfortable ride and I look forward to riding it as much as I can.

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Hello. How is the fit with the Target top tube bag? Is it so big your knees hit it? Out of the saddle? Is the top tube strap long enough to secure it on the big Haibike top tube?
 
#14
Hello. How is the fit with the Target top tube bag? Is it so big your knees hit it? Out of the saddle? Is the top tube strap long enough to secure it on the big Haibike top tube?
It fits better than I expected it, to be honest. Were I to buy the larger bag that wraps over both sides of the frame, I am quite sure I would bump into that. The water bottle to its right is a VERY convenient spot for the bottle .... all of my other bikes have the bottle bosses on the frame under the seat, so you can't easily reach it while riding. The two are held in place by velcro straps so its fairly easy to fit both around the handlebar stem.