Haibike sizes are strange, mine too! Help me decide wisely...

#1
Hi there,

I've read a lot of articles and posts regarding the correct bike size and how to choose it, but still the confusion is great.

I know that Haibike' sizes are a little odd, and people tend to end up with smaller frames.

But let's start from the beginning. I currently own a Sduro Trekking 5.0, size XL (60cm frame height, or 23,6" if you prefer). You can see all available specs and sizes here: https://www.haibike.com/it/IT/bikes/548/2018-sduro-trekking-5-0?variant=4540248848

I've chosen the XL because I'm very tall: 6ft and 5inches.

Only after a while I realized that while being taller than a lamppost, my inseam is a lot shorter: ”only” 93 cm (36 inches).

After a couple of weeks of daily use, I started to feel numbness to the finger of my left hand, that according to my more experienced biker friends could be related to the position I'm forced to.

I don't know, maybe the handlebar is too far away or too low?

Considering that I end up using the seat in a very low position, I'm tempted to think that maybe a smaller frame would be more adequate for me? According to what I've read around, a 22" frame (Haibike "L") should be more fitting for my inseam.
I'm in the process of swapping the 5.0 for a 9.0 for other reasons, so I have a chance of getting a different size and I don't want to go wrong.

I know the obvious answer is "go to your LBD and try a different frame", but sadly there is none available in the L size.

Does anyone here had similar experiences and/or frame/body sizes?

Any comment is appreciated. :)

Thanks a lot!
 
#2
I am 6'7". I ride a FullSeven that is L, labeled 55cm on the seat post tube. Inseam around 35". I think thew bike fits me well. At stops I can stay on the seat if I am on my tippy toes. I made sure the handlebar stem were at their highest setting, as well as making sure that the seat post itself is not overextended past the max mark.
I was getting numbness in my fingers as well for the first few weeks of riding. I got into the habit of wearing gel padded gloves (with cutoff fingers) and rarely get numbness now.
All in all I wouldn't want a larger frame. The way I have it set up now my legs are fairly straight at the bottom of the stroke. If it was a taller frame it could be difficult to stay on the seat at stops, or even off the seat.
 

batmick1

Active Member
#3
I am the same height and also own a Haibike Trekking but I actually went the other way and got a 64cm.

In the smaller frame size you will need to raise the seatpost a lot to have a good position for your leg extension. That, in turn, on a small frame will lead to a strong lean forward and more load on your hands.

To me it sounds like you will be much better off by choosing a different stem (steeper or shorter) and/or tweak the position of your handlebar. You might also benefit from bar ends so you can change your hand position during longer rides.

Also don't underestimate how much of a difference the grips make. Try some with a different compound or diameter. A cheap and easy switch that can work wonders in terms of comfort.
 

JayVee

Well-Known Member
#4
Use the reference of a previous bike on which you felt comfortable and then compare the geometries. You'll probably still find the geometry for older models somewhere on the web.
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
#5
I am the same height and also own a Haibike Trekking but I actually went the other way and got a 64cm.

In the smaller frame size you will need to raise the seatpost a lot to have a good position for your leg extension. That, in turn, on a small frame will lead to a strong lean forward and more load on your hands.

To me it sounds like you will be much better off by choosing a different stem (steeper or shorter) and/or tweak the position of your handlebar. You might also benefit from bar ends so you can change your hand position during longer rides.

Also don't underestimate how much of a difference the grips make. Try some with a different compound or diameter. A cheap and easy switch that can work wonders in terms of comfort.
Mick is right!
A proper stem, handlebar and grips combo can do wonders.
 

batmick1

Active Member
#6
I am 6'7". I ride a FullSeven that is L, labeled 55cm on the seat post tube. Inseam around 35". I think thew bike fits me well. At stops I can stay on the seat if I am on my tippy toes. I made sure the handlebar stem were at their highest setting, as well as making sure that the seat post itself is not overextended past the max mark.
I was getting numbness in my fingers as well for the first few weeks of riding. I got into the habit of wearing gel padded gloves (with cutoff fingers) and rarely get numbness now.
All in all I wouldn't want a larger frame. The way I have it set up now my legs are fairly straight at the bottom of the stroke. If it was a taller frame it could be difficult to stay on the seat at stops, or even off the seat.
Just to clarify, one of the few things that don't really change with frame size (or at least not much) is the ground clearance = distance from bottom bracket to ground. When you adjust your seatpost to match the distance from saddle to cranks (bottom bracket) that is the only thing that brings you higher to the point where you can't reach the ground anymore. So when you buy a larger frame vs. a smaller frame, the thing that changes most is how much you need to pull the seatpost out.
However, the rest of the frame, like the top tube length and the head tube length (and with it the position of the stem and bar) also increase with frame size. So what you want to look for is a size that allows you enough leeway to adjust the seatpost up or down while not making you feel cramped or stretched out when you have the saddle in the right position.
This is much more important for a road bike, which is why better bike shops will have a fitting frame to determine the best frame size and then also taylor the individual components (stem, bar, seatpost etc.) with which you can tweak the seating position for optimal ergonomics.
 
#7
Thanks for the feedback.

I don't know, Mick's casa makes perfect sense but the general consensus seems to be that you mostly choose your bike depending on your inseam.

The fact that on my actual XL I have to keep the seat post nearly all the way into the frame seems to point that the frame is a little to big for my legspan.

I'll try and search for a dealer with a fitting frame, that would be great!
 

batmick1

Active Member
#8
Thanks for the feedback.

I don't know, Mick's casa makes perfect sense but the general consensus seems to be that you mostly choose your bike depending on your inseam.

The fact that on my actual XL I have to keep the seat post nearly all the way into the frame seems to point that the frame is a little to big for my legspan.

I'll try and search for a dealer with a fitting frame, that would be great!

Yes, as a first estimate your inseam and torso length dictate the range of frame sizes that might work for you. But even for a given maker, different models will have a different fit even when they nominally are the same size. So nothing beats an actual test ride.

What you are describing does sound like you could go down one size but you may find that then you feel cramped between saddle and seat. You can adjust that by moving the saddle back and getting a longer stem, but you can only tweak so much.