Is it bad to use highest pedal assist a lot?

CaitlinD

New Member
Hi! This is my first post in the forum! I'm sorry if this has been posted before, I tried to search for this topic, but it was hard to find the right wording in a search.

We have an EG Athens 350 that my husband and I both use from time to time. My (former motorcylist) husband likes to put the bike in High and then spin his legs just barely engaging the cranks. (He does this on flat terrain, on hills he has accepted that he needs to help the motor.) I know this will drain the battery fast, but that is not a big concern for us. What I'm wondering is if this will put unnecessary strain on the motor? What are the potential long term consequences of using the bike like this?

Thanks!
 

CaitlinD

New Member
Right. We mostly have short rides so that's not a huge issue. When I do a longer ride I'm careful to keep it in low or med. What I'm wondering is if it's going to kill the motor prematurely by doing this.
 

DaveMatthews

Well-Known Member
The bike is made for those tolerances, so not to worry.
I tend to stay in level 2 or 3 (out of 5), just so I can get max range while still putting in effort.
If you are always short range riding, then I'd suggest only charging the battery to 80% or so in order to extend its life/charge cycles.
 

harryS

Well-Known Member
I noted your other post about using the Athens on hills. My answer is that it doesn't hurt to run the motor fast on flat ground, but it can overheat the motor if you are cranking it really slow up a steep hill with no pedaling help. Heat will soften the nylon gears, heat the windings, and especially overheat the three silicon position sensors in the motor.

Put you hand near the motor after a hill climb, and if you can still touch it without being uncomfortable, it's not too hot. If it doesn't get hot, it will be fine.
 

Alex M

Active Member
What Harry said. On a steep hill with this (relatively) weak motor, with minimal pedal assistance it could overheat and sometimes stall, with a heavier rider. This is not good for a motor. On flat terrain high PAS level won't affect the motor, but your range will be shorter.
 

Cowlitz

Well-Known Member
I noted your other post about using the Athens on hills. My answer is that it doesn't hurt to run the motor fast on flat ground, but it can overheat the motor if you are cranking it really slow up a steep hill with no pedaling help. Heat will soften the nylon gears, heat the windings, and especially overheat the three silicon position sensors in the motor.

Put you hand near the motor after a hill climb, and if you can still touch it without being uncomfortable, it's not too hot. If it doesn't get hot, it will be fine.
Yes. This is good advice.

I feel like the G-forces put too much strain on my neck when I kick the Mini into warp drive.....oooh, she cannah take much moore, Captain!! :)
 

Bicyclista

Active Member
I ride my Haibike AllMtn Plus on HIGH all the time. I get about 35 miles range in mixed terrain (about 40 miles when the bike was new 3 years ago). I climb many hills and the Yamaha motor has never overheated in over 7,000 miles. I know I could get greater range if I rode in STD (for Standard) or ECO mode, but I don't need greater range, and HIGH is more fun. I feel like Superman and you, @CaitlinD, would feel like Superwoman!
 

fr8dogjoe

Member
I do not recall an Uncle Bob. I ride mostly in ECO mode until I come to a hill. Depending on how I feel, will determine the level of assist.
 

Feliz

Well-Known Member
"Bob's your uncle" is a phrase commonly used in United Kingdom and Commonwealth countries that means "and there it is" or "and there you have it." Typically, someone says it to conclude a set of simple instructions or when a result is reached. The meaning is similar to that of the French expression "et voilà!"
My uncle Bob died years ago and never had the benefit of pedal assist, poor bugger. I'm familiar with the term, did you hear it in the UK?
 

Thomas Jaszewski

Well-Known Member
My uncle Bob died years ago and never had the benefit of pedal assist, poor bugger. I'm familiar with the term, did you hear it in the UK?
Lots of UK pals so I've been hearing it for at least 20 years and using it for a decade. It was so common I just slipped into its use. No plan. Just an old brain that sometimes spits out things without a second thought.