Is the CCS legal in Canada (BC)?

sshrinivasan

New Member
According to then law, the motor must "have continuous power output ratings that in total do not exceed 500 watts"

I read that the Bafang motor is "Electronically limited to 500W to meet Canadian law. User upgradeable to 650W for off road use". What does "User upgradeable" mean? If I go into the settings and allow "Sport Mode" and a top speed of "42 kph", is that changing the continuous power output of the motor past 500W?

Also, according the regulations the motor must "(c)not be capable of propelling the motor assisted cycle at a speed greater than 32 km/hr on level ground.". Does that mean legally I should only be operating in Eco, 1 or 2 mode, and 3 is illegal? I believe that mode 3 and Sport allow the motor to assist me past 32 kph, is that right?
 

Bruce Arnold

Well-Known Member
What that all means is that it's a software fix. The bikes come with software settings set to Canadian specs. The hardware is the same. You can change the software limits if you go into the setting module on the display.

Is that sufficient to be legal in Canada? No one knows until the first case goes to court and a judge decides. Until then, all we know is that Juiced is making a good-faith effort to provide their product to Canadians without having to have two separate manufacturing runs with different motors.

Honestly, these laws that specify wattage limits are inherently flawed, and I hope the court that gets the case will decide on that basis. Is there any motor that is not actually capable of putting out more horsepower than its nominal rating?
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
I believe BC uses California classifications.

Class 1, 2 and 3.

Class 1 - 32km/h, no throttle, 500W limit
Class 2 - 32km/h, with throttle
Class 3 - 45km/h, no throttle

Class 1 is specified to 500W, however no specification on wattage for Class 2 and 3, probably due to the fact that so many Class 2 or 3 are 750W nominal (maximum is even higher)

Class 2 and 3 are "motor vehicle" and not permitted in environmentally sensitive area.
So I guess you can only ride it on asphalt.

 
I believe BC uses California classifications.

Class 1, 2 and 3.

Class 1 - 32km/h, no throttle, 500W limit
Class 2 - 32km/h, with throttle
Class 3 - 45km/h, no throttle

Class 1 is specified to 500W, however no specification on wattage for Class 2 and 3, probably due to the fact that so many Class 2 or 3 are 750W nominal (maximum is even higher)

Class 2 and 3 are "motor vehicle" and not permitted in environmentally sensitive area.
So I guess you can only ride it on asphalt.

Hi Timpo,

I like your description of the classes, I can only hope it’s accurate because it certainly doesn’t seem logical. Why would you have a separate class for a bike with a throttle. The throttle still only moves the bike forward, like peddling. And what if I have a bike w throttle that has a 750w motor (like the Voltbike Yukon 750) set to max speed of 40kph...what class is that? 2 or 3? I think it’s a class 2 because it’s limited to 32kph by the software.

As to your second point, I don’t think it has to do with wattage. I think the government is after setting speed regulations for bikes that will be travelling on bike paths with oldies and littles. Where people are used to the occasional hard peddler flying by at 30-40kph on the flats. They’re envisioning the motorized maniacs running down children and their grandmothers at 45+kph, so they want to restrict all e bikes to 32kph assisted or throttle. It’s not too hard or uncommon to hit 32kph on a flat paved bike path with a pedal bike.

Maybe I’m missing something but it seems to me Nominal output vs peak is a mute point, as long as the bike is limited to 32kph.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
Hi Timpo,

I like your description of the classes, I can only hope it’s accurate because it certainly doesn’t seem logical. Why would you have a separate class for a bike with a throttle. The throttle still only moves the bike forward, like peddling. And what if I have a bike w throttle that has a 750w motor (like the Voltbike Yukon 750) set to max speed of 40kph...what class is that? 2 or 3? I think it’s a class 2 because it’s limited to 32kph by the software.

As to your second point, I don’t think it has to do with wattage. I think the government is after setting speed regulations for bikes that will be travelling on bike paths with oldies and littles. Where people are used to the occasional hard peddler flying by at 30-40kph on the flats. They’re envisioning the motorized maniacs running down children and their grandmothers at 45+kph, so they want to restrict all e bikes to 32kph assisted or throttle. It’s not too hard or uncommon to hit 32kph on a flat paved bike path with a pedal bike.

Maybe I’m missing something but it seems to me Nominal output vs peak is a mute point, as long as the bike is limited to 32kph.
The example of Class 3 ebike is Stromer ST2 and ST5.

They're Class 3, Stromer ST5 has 850W motor, limited to 45km/h and no throttle.
As for your argument about throttle, the law perceives if you can reach 45km/h just by twisting a throttle, it's a motorcycle.
However, if you have to pedal, it's a pedal assisted bike.

The other example is Juiced CrossCurrent S, 45km/h top speed and no throttle.
However Juiced or Hilleater Bikes (Canadian Juiced distributor) offers throttle option. If you get a throttle, it's limited to 32km/h and you need to pedal to go beyond 32km/h. So the assist goes all the way up to 45km/h, but throttle feature will stop at 32km/h.

I know Volt Bikes, Pedego, Amego, etc... can be all set up to 40km/h with throttle.
However, I believe (not 100% sure) the throttle will stop at 32km/h, if you want to go beyond, you have to pedal and the bike will assist you up to 40km/h.