KineKT Body Float Post - Rider Weight

#1
Looking for input from Body Float users. I understand that when you buy this post each one comes with two additional springs, one lower and one higher weight class, to 'customize' your experience. When I look at the weight categories at 192 pounds I'm near the edge of moving to the Large unit......and if you factor in clothes etc I'm probably right on that cut off of 200 pounds.

Will one of the extra springs, the stronger orange one, provide the extra suspension so I can stay with the Medium unit or should I go with Large?

Anyone else in this situation of being on edge of the next weight bracket?

Thanks....
 

mrgold35

Well-Known Member
#2
I have two older Bodyfloat v2.0 in the 350 mm for my wife at 130 lbs with purple springs (100-150 lbs) and 420 mm length with orange springs (200-250 lbs) for me at 270 lbs. I know you can use different colored upper and lower springs to split the rider's weight (example: using black/orange springs for 175-225 lbs range). I don't know where the one black and one orange springs need to go in the upper or lower location? One extra black spring is only $10. It took me 20-30 minutes to change both the upper/lower to purple springs when I add the Bodyfloat to my wife's Radcity Step-Thru.

Might have to call Kinekt or write them if you wanted to mix springs:

(360) 392-8302
info@cirruscycles.com

I'm over the recommended max weight for the Bodyfloat orange springs. I might even be about +20 lbs heavier in full winter cold weather riding gear and commuter backpack. The Bodyfloat has performed perfectly for +18 months and +3500 miles. I've noticed I stay on the saddle about 95% of time over bumps compared to lifting off the seat 95% without a suspension seatpost. I also hit bumps harder because of the higher average speed of my ebike compared to my old pedal commuter bike.

Maybe, going for the double orange springs might work because of the higher ebike speeds and being able to stay in the saddle more often on rough terrain.
 
#3
Thanks a lot it's very helpful, I think at 192 pounds I'll stick with the Medium set up and install the one orange spring to give me a bit more weight range as you mentioned (up to the 225).

I was debating whether to get the long or shorter seat post but the dealer said he only brings in the long so that solves that decision for me haha. At 6'3 I'm sure longer is better.
 

mrgold35

Well-Known Member
#4
I'm 6'3" also and went with the 420mm version with Cloud-9 12.5X11.5 Cruiser seat. I have a Radrover and started out with the Bodyfloat 350 mm (the 420 mm wasn't available back then). The seat will sag around 1/2-1" inch or more depending on the amount of float you dial in. My 350mm Bodyfloat felt more like a 330-340mm and that little bit of dip caused my right knee to ache. I would have to take a day off after 3-4 days of riding and my knee would sometimes hurt when walking up/down stairs. It helped to raise the 350mm seat above the max height line; but, I didn't feel safe riding like that. I ended up switching back to my 400mm Suntour NCX SP-12.

I jumped on the 420mm Bodyfloat when it came available and haven't looked back since. Zero issues with aching knee and next level comfort over the Suntour NCX SP-12. I keep the 420mm seat post around at the 21.5 lenght and float around 3-3.5 range.
 

mrgold35

Well-Known Member
#6
Per the manual, you should always be under the max weight , never the other way around. I assume spring damage is possible and then seat failure...
I'm a very light 270 lbs compared to a heavy 270 lbs. ;)

Sometimes there are limited choices for below/above average adults in height, size, weight, and length in the cycling world for bikes, clothing, and accessories. I went by the feedback of other above average adults using the Suntour NCX SP-12 and Bodyfloat v2.0 with orange springs and they had zero issues at even higher weights and more mileage I'm doing. I still have both suspension seats and they are looking to last a lifetime with minimal maintenance. I do check the bushings on the bodyfloat and they look/feel like new. Planning to replace bushings in a few months with a rebuild parts for $20 from Kinekt since I will have +4000 miles on the seatpost by spring time.
 
#7
Just received the Kineckt Bodyfloat seat post and I’m kind of disappointed. I weigh no where near 260 lbs and it’s bottoming out. I’m increasing the preload but there’s not much travel left. Feels like a half inch travel left. I’m I doing something wrong or do I need to keep increasing the preload? The springs are marked orange for my weight. 200 - 260 lbs. I’m bottom it out just sitting on it in my shop.
 

Over50

Well-Known Member
#8
Just received the Kineckt Bodyfloat seat post and I’m kind of disappointed. I weigh no where near 260 lbs and it’s bottoming out. I’m increasing the preload but there’s not much travel left. Feels like a half inch travel left. I’m I doing something wrong or do I need to keep increasing the preload? The springs are marked orange for my weight. 200 - 260 lbs. I’m bottom it out just sitting on it in my shop.
Yes, sounds like something is wrong. If the videos on their website don't solve the issue, have you tried contacting them? I have their product on at least 3 bikes and I have found them to be very responsive. I can't speak to your issue because I only weigh about 165 and use the black springs. But the seat posts with black springs have worked perfectly for me.
 
#9
I just backed off the preload and rode down the driveway and it felt much better. Apparently when you’re pedaling you’re not placing your full weight on the seat post. It felt awful with the preload cranked way up. Some more experimentation is needed.
 

mrgold35

Well-Known Member
#10
I have my v2.0 420mm 27.2mm Bodyfloat with two orange springs set around 2.5 range. I've never noticed it bottoming out when sitting on the seatpost or over bumps at my weight of +270lbs. I might be pushing +290 lbs in winter with cold weather gear and commuter backpack (work cloths, lunch, coffee, electronics). The issue I have is my Rover is made for a max height of 6'2" and I'm 6'3". I have the 420mm seatpost on max height and 2.5 setting feels the most comfy for my work commute. I probably could dial-in more "float"; but, it would drop the seat a little bit. The Bodyfloat still provides a more comfy ride overall compared to my 400mm Suntour NCX SP-12.
 
#11
I have my v2.0 420mm 27.2mm Bodyfloat with two orange springs set around 2.5 range. I've never noticed it bottoming out when sitting on the seatpost or over bumps at my weight of +270lbs. I might be pushing +290 lbs in winter with cold weather gear and commuter backpack (work cloths, lunch, coffee, electronics). The issue I have is my Rover is made for a max height of 6'2" and I'm 6'3". I have the 420mm seatpost on max height and 2.5 setting feels the most comfy for my work commute. I probably could dial-in more "float"; but, it would drop the seat a little bit. The Bodyfloat still provides a more comfy ride overall compared to my 400mm Suntour NCX SP-12.
Thanks. The weather looks good this weekend so I'll really give it a good workout. I weight in the 215 - 225 lbs range depending on the season. I can easily bottom out the seat post with my full weight. This is with my hands off the the handlebar and my feet on the ground though. When I'm pedaling it appears to be a different animal.
 
#12
They are making an Kinekt XL for up to 300lbs. I would send them an email and see when they plan to have them in stores. I have had several email/phone exchanges with them and they are super helpful and very responsive.
 

mrgold35

Well-Known Member
#13
They are making an Kinekt XL for up to 300lbs. I would send them an email and see when they plan to have them in stores. I have had several email/phone exchanges with them and they are super helpful and very responsive.
I have about +3000 miles on my Kinekt v2.0 with orange springs. I decided to replace the bushings with the rebuild kit they offered over X-mas. Only about a 1 hour job and there is a YouTube vid on replacing the springs. Replacing the springs vid can get you 90% of the way there to the next step of replacing the white bushings.

What surprised me was how good of shape the old bushings were after so many miles. The old bushings had very little to no wear, no play with float system, not deformed in any way because of my 270-300lbs weight work commuting and trail riding. I think I can easily put +5000 miles before I need to think about doing another rebuild. The Kinekt suspension seatpost was well worth the investment and it will last 2X-3X longer than my ebike.
 
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6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
#14
Unless you do a lot of rough riding, it's been my experience that the next lightest spring preload for you body weight produces a better ride. I'm 260# and used this approach with my Kinekt 2.0. I got the best results using an orange and a black spring. The only down side to doing this is you reduce the 35mm of travel somewhat since you compress the springs a bit by just sitting on the bike. This leaves less travel available to absorb shock.

While this worked well for me when riding relatively smooth surfaces, I would frequently bottom out the post on rough trails. At first, I would swap out the black spring for another orange when doing serious trail riding. Unfortunately, this takes a bit of time with the Kinekt. I was about to buy a second Kinekt with 2 orange springs for trail riding when I saw the Thudbuster LT. It was $100 cheaper than the Kinekt and has a full 76mm of travel. I installed #7 elastomers even though #9's were recommended for my weight. I lose about a third of the travel when sitting on the seat but the remaining two thirds is plenty for rough trails. The only down side to the elastomers is they get stiffer in cold temperatures where as the springs in the Kinekt remain constant. This isn't a problem for me since I rarely ride in temps below 30 degrees.

I installed purple springs in the Kenekt and put it on my wife's bike. At 125#, It works perfectly for her since she rarely rides on extreme surfaces.
 
#15
I have a Kinekt on my road bike and a recently purchased Thudbuster LT on my mtb. It's been too wet to test the Thudbuster. Not sure which one I like better. More testing is needed.
 

Over50

Well-Known Member
#16
I was pleasantly surprised with the Thudbuster ST. I have Kinekts on several bikes and figured I would notice a big difference when I went to Thudbuster. I haven't. The Thudbuster works well enough that I don't find myself missing the Kinekt. They are both good products and live up to advertising claims IMO.
 
#17
Looking for input from Body Float users. I understand that when you buy this post each one comes with two additional springs, one lower and one higher weight class, to 'customize' your experience. When I look at the weight categories at 192 pounds I'm near the edge of moving to the Large unit......and if you factor in clothes etc I'm probably right on that cut off of 200 pounds.

Will one of the extra springs, the stronger orange one, provide the extra suspension so I can stay with the Medium unit or should I go with Large?

Anyone else in this situation of being on edge of the next weight bracket?

Thanks....
I have Body Float on my Vado 6.0. Made a huge difference while riding on our crumbling infrastructure roads. But at 135 lbs I found the included spings were fine with only some minor tweaking.
However I did call the customer service for a couple pointers. I found them to be outstanding! Very courteous, articulate and volunteered much info. I would encourage you to call them if you need info.