Lynskey E-Bike Announced

Nova Haibike

Well-Known Member
#2
For the amount of money that bike is likely to cost, I would want a more elegant look. While I can appreciate the advantages of a normal battery, the lack of motor and battery integration is disappointing from an aesthetic viewpoint.
 
#3
For the amount of money that bike is likely to cost, I would want a more elegant look. While I can appreciate the advantages of a normal battery, the lack of motor and battery integration is disappointing from an aesthetic viewpoint.

That's one of the reasons I have a Obrea Carbon Gain on order.
 

Ken M

Active Member
#4
It's going to be a while before we see anyone tightly integrate a battery "into" a Titanium frame. I would prefer that someone produce a titanium frame model with a much more upright riding position. I'm 57 years old and I can not ride with my hands below my seating position and with a motor why does being in that aerodynamic and uncomfortable (for everyone in reality) position even matter? I think the designers of ebikes need to understand that what makes sense on a traditional bike may not be a good decision on an ebike design.
 
#5
Interesting point you highlight. Many endurance style frames now though provide a very comfortable riding position, the Trek "Domane" for example. As for Titanium, it appears to be coming a material small specialist frame builders are producing bespoke only. Not many are qualified to work with this difficult material.
 

Ken M

Active Member
#6
Interesting point you highlight. Many endurance style frames now though provide a very comfortable riding position, the Trek "Domane" for example. As for Titanium, it appears to be coming a material small specialist frame builders are producing bespoke only. Not many are qualified to work with this difficult material.
There are some more upright urban bikes being produced. The Trek Super Commuter and Specialized Turbo Vado are good examples but even those could be a bit more upright in my opinion. Being more upright is just safer for more riders because visibility is much better. I know there are very upright beach cruiser style ebikes available but they don't tend to have the handling that the aforementioned models do.

As for drop bar ebikes like the Lynskey I understand the appeal from a traditional look point of view - drop bar bikes are sexy looking but does anyone really need to be super aero on an ebike. I hope I don't start to see spandexters riding ebikes like this because that would just not make any sense to me. Spandex belongs in racing and when riders are out for ultimate performance on a road bike. The merits of an electric assist should encourage riders to be more upright, comfortable, and safer due to increased visibility. How many motorcycles do you know of with bars below the level of the seat.
 

JRA

Well-Known Member
#7
Ken M, if drop bar type bikes don't work for you then that's just fine and you should seek out the riding position that is most comfortable for you. But that doesn't mean that others don't have their reasons for using drop bar bikes other than what I think you are describing as vanity.

Although I have been primarily a MTB rider for the last 35yrs. I find my two drop bar road bikes to be very comfortable for long rides and handle really well also even in mild off road type terrain. I'm sorry I don't see your points against using them, even about the safety factor which I also don't find to be an issue. What does it matter also what someone wears while riding their bike e or not? Spandex is not just for racing.

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So live and let live eh?

As far as the Lynskey goes it will perhaps find a bit of a following with their brand fans but realistically Ti is not going to be worth the cost for an eBike. Material and production costs are high as mentioned and it will be hard/impossible to ever integrate the battery in the down tube as has become expected with the carbon and alu frames which are much easier to achieve that feature with via moulds and hydro forming.

The problem is that now a days if you don't have an eBike in the lineup you are missing out on potential sales. Or with a company like Lynskey it is possible you might alienate your customer base by providing an eBike. It's a fine line.
 

Ken M

Active Member
#8
I'm not being critical of the merits of drop bars or spandex. They both are certainly important in bike racing, but honestly are they really that important for recreational or fitness riding? In general bikers tend to emulate what the top people in the sport wear. This is true for both road racers and mtn bikers....the term spandexters originated from the biking community so it's not a negative....it's an applicable term for those riders that were spandex even if they are not racing. Then again some bodies look pretty good in spandex, but let's be honest, not typically.

I'm am wondering what % of bikers would say that an aggressive riding position typical on drop bar road bikes is as comfortable as an upright riding position of a city / beach cruiser. I understand that drops bars may not be uncomfortable for some riders but I don't think many would say it's the most comfortable riding position.

I fully respect to each his own. My comments are about the design merits of an aggressive riding position on an ebike - I just don't think it's as important to be aerodynamic on an ebike so the merits of spandex and drop bars are less important.
 

Nova Haibike

Well-Known Member
#9
The Lynskey bike is not a racing bike; it is indeed built for the more novice or mature rider. That is why the head tube is so long...so the handlebars would be higher relative to the saddle. The marketing guys show the bike with the seat post extended because it looks better, but you can bet many of those who have such a bike will have the bars level or higher than the saddle.
 
#10
I'm not being critical of the merits of drop bars or spandex. They both are certainly important in bike racing, but honestly are they really that important for recreational or fitness riding? In general bikers tend to emulate what the top people in the sport wear. This is true for both road racers and mtn bikers....the term spandexters originated from the biking community so it's not a negative....it's an applicable term for those riders that were spandex even if they are not racing. Then again some bodies look pretty good in spandex, but let's be honest, not typically.

I'm am wondering what % of bikers would say that an aggressive riding position typical on drop bar road bikes is as comfortable as an upright riding position of a city / beach cruiser. I understand that drops bars may not be uncomfortable for some riders but I don't think many would say it's the most comfortable riding position.

I fully respect to each his own. My comments are about the design merits of an aggressive riding position on an ebike - I just don't think it's as important to be aerodynamic on an ebike so the merits of spandex and drop bars are less important.
Drop bars are more comfortable for long road rides. You have more hand positions. Locking yourself in one grip position using flat bars leads to numb hands and wrists. Even on my mountain bike, I use bar ends because they give me another bar position. Having some body weight on the arms takes some load off the saddle and prevents saddle soreness. Drop bar reach and drop can be adjusted so the position is not that aggressive. Most people ride on the hoods for most of the ride, but the drops are best for descending or going into a headwind.
 
#11
There are some very good points above ^ for E Road bikes with drop bars. It's true, some people have flexibility issues and can't or don't prefer to ride bikes with drop bars. For me, an E Road bike would fit right into my 6 day a week training program. It would allow me to train 6 days a week on the bike as opposed to 4 because of the needed recovery. Every moment I spend on the bike getting the target HR zone I'm looking for that day AND getting time on the bike for motor skills development pays big dividends in skills and time on task.

As far as "not needing to be aero so why bother with a road bike"; when it comes to aerodynamics, wheel weight and total weight, somebody is going to pay the price for forward momentum. A more efficient E bike is going to have greater range than one that has aero and weight disadvantages.