Magnum Metro user report 1 year later

David Roy

Well-Known Member
My wife and I bought Magnum Metro bikes in May of 2018. We are experienced cyclists, but knew little about ebikes. We live in hilly Northeastern Connecticut and as we aged (65+) the hills have grown, limiting our riding. This corner of the state is laced with miles and miles of country roads and beautiful hills to climb. We didn’t want to stop biking. Ebikes seemed the perfect solution. We tried a pair of Magnum Metro bikes and bought them the same day.

A year later I’m even more convinced that ebikes are the perfect biking solution for us. The Magnum bikes have been fun and reliable. I have just over 3000 miles and Marji has around 2000. Early on we both had our cassettes fail and be replaced under warranty. Marji’s tire bulged out a sidewall at less than 50 miles and that was also replaced under warranty. I had one flat a few weeks ago. That’s it for problems. The Bicycle Celler in Simsbury, CT has been excellent to deal with, taking care of the problems without fuss.

These bikes don’t ride like analog bikes. They have hub motors and simple cadence controllers along with a thumb throttle. At the lowest power level they want to cruise along at 12-13 mph. So as soon as you start pedaling ZOOM you feel the motor take over and you are playing pedal catch up. We grew accustomed to the zoom and now enjoy it, but it did take some getting used to. Each power level above 1 adds to the minimum speed until the max at 25 mph in level 6. We normally ride in 1 saving the higher speeds for when we have rain to outrun. Cadence speed and torque are not measured. It’s just pedaling or not pedaling. Pedaling with more torque adds marginally to road speed and might reduce battery usage a bit, but not to a great extent. It does give me a better workout and just feels better. I enjoy a 12-15 mph average pace. It allows me to enjoy the scenery and still cover lots of ground. I bike for enjoyment and exercise, not commuting. The bikes are very stable so downhills are for speed and are lots of fun. Marji has been known to pass me at 40+ mph on one particular steep straight hill.

We did not find these bikes appropriate for off road riding. The 12 mph minimum is too fast. Cutting the motor out using the brake levers or selecting power level 0 is possible, but then you find yourself pedaling a 60+ pound bike uphill on soft or very rough surfaces. We managed to get through some tough spots using a light touch on the throttle but we avoid that type of riding where possible.

The hub motors have been sufficient for any of the hills, including some short 20% grades. We generally leave the setting at 1 and downshift going uphill to “help” the bikes as they slow down. We could up the power level or use the throttle, but shifting feels more like a traditional bike.

My longest ride has been about 50 miles. I rode in power level 1 and the battery had about 5 miles left when I got home. This points to a problem with the bike. The battery is big and heavy at over 9 pounds. There really isn’t a good way to carry an extra battery. I did see a clever solution where a second battery was strapped onto the angled down tube that might be worth trying but it is definitely a kluge.

To sum up. This is an affordable, fun and reliable bike. The low step frame makes it very accessible. It works well in our environment of lightly traveled and hilly country roads. The major downside is the very simple cadence motor control.

IMG_1620.JPG
 

vincent

Well-Known Member
Great write up, thanks for taking the time to post

I looked at the magnum bikes and the deciding factor for me was the lousy programming of the controllers, unfortunately so many of these companies have not refined their programming

I don’t know if you can program the controller on a Magnum but you may be able to
 

Bobsiii

Active Member
Nice report, I'm a bit more than a month into my Metro ownership with no real problems so it's good to hear these long term reports. Totally agree about the "kick", I've found that a touch of throttle at stop lights etc gets me started gentler and it's easy to take over with pedals. It can also make it difficult to maneuver in tight situations i.e. a sharp right angle onto a bridge with heavy ped/bike traffic and tight entrance/exit. Found that one out the hard way.
 

harryS

Well-Known Member
Enjoyed the read. Nice to live in an area where you have lightly traveled country roads. I only get to see that when we visit my friend's cottage on Lake Michigan in NE Wisconsin. Perfect for biking because most of the residents are summer visitors, many who bike or take walks, so all the local traffic is bike-aware if not bike-friendly. I go nuts and do 50 miles in a day. Otherwise, it's local bike paths at home. In either case, we also find 12-15 mph is a good speed.

Hi vincent. . Most cadence sensors seem to have picked 12 mph as the top of the first assist level. Some accelerate faster than others to get there, especially the 48V systems. What I find is that if I ride a little faster than the assist level, like David says, I get a workout and it feels like biking. I need a shower when I come home anyway. For slower riding, like below 10 mph, we just shut off the assist or squeeze the brake lever lightly. After the first few months, it's automatic. In any case, at my speeds, battery capacity is 2x what people usually quote for range.

Hi Bobsiii. You learn to squeeze the brakes for low speed maneuvers. We all find out the hard way. Torque sensor riders learn not to rest their feet too hard on the pedals when stopped too. All ebikes have quirks and riders just have to learn them.
 

Mike's E-Bikes

Well-Known Member
My wife and I bought Magnum Metro bikes in May of 2018. We are experienced cyclists, but knew little about ebikes. We live in hilly Northeastern Connecticut and as we aged (65+) the hills have grown, limiting our riding. This corner of the state is laced with miles and miles of country roads and beautiful hills to climb. We didn’t want to stop biking. Ebikes seemed the perfect solution. We tried a pair of Magnum Metro bikes and bought them the same day.

A year later I’m even more convinced that ebikes are the perfect biking solution for us. The Magnum bikes have been fun and reliable. I have just over 3000 miles and Marji has around 2000. Early on we both had our cassettes fail and be replaced under warranty. Marji’s tire bulged out a sidewall at less than 50 miles and that was also replaced under warranty. I had one flat a few weeks ago. That’s it for problems. The Bicycle Celler in Simsbury, CT has been excellent to deal with, taking care of the problems without fuss.

These bikes don’t ride like analog bikes. They have hub motors and simple cadence controllers along with a thumb throttle. At the lowest power level they want to cruise along at 12-13 mph. So as soon as you start pedaling ZOOM you feel the motor take over and you are playing pedal catch up. We grew accustomed to the zoom and now enjoy it, but it did take some getting used to. Each power level above 1 adds to the minimum speed until the max at 25 mph in level 6. We normally ride in 1 saving the higher speeds for when we have rain to outrun. Cadence speed and torque are not measured. It’s just pedaling or not pedaling. Pedaling with more torque adds marginally to road speed and might reduce battery usage a bit, but not to a great extent. It does give me a better workout and just feels better. I enjoy a 12-15 mph average pace. It allows me to enjoy the scenery and still cover lots of ground. I bike for enjoyment and exercise, not commuting. The bikes are very stable so downhills are for speed and are lots of fun. Marji has been known to pass me at 40+ mph on one particular steep straight hill.

We did not find these bikes appropriate for off road riding. The 12 mph minimum is too fast. Cutting the motor out using the brake levers or selecting power level 0 is possible, but then you find yourself pedaling a 60+ pound bike uphill on soft or very rough surfaces. We managed to get through some tough spots using a light touch on the throttle but we avoid that type of riding where possible.

The hub motors have been sufficient for any of the hills, including some short 20% grades. We generally leave the setting at 1 and downshift going uphill to “help” the bikes as they slow down. We could up the power level or use the throttle, but shifting feels more like a traditional bike.

My longest ride has been about 50 miles. I rode in power level 1 and the battery had about 5 miles left when I got home. This points to a problem with the bike. The battery is big and heavy at over 9 pounds. There really isn’t a good way to carry an extra battery. I did see a clever solution where a second battery was strapped onto the angled down tube that might be worth trying but it is definitely a kluge.

To sum up. This is an affordable, fun and reliable bike. The low step frame makes it very accessible. It works well in our environment of lightly traveled and hilly country roads. The major downside is the very simple cadence motor control.

View attachment 33387
You do realize that you can soften up the 'kick' or rather the acceleration by going into the 2nd level menu and change riding mode to Eco or Normal, if it's in Power. Sounds like you are in Power riding mode. Code is 8088 when you get to pass code after holding down + and - buttons at same time. You'll also get more range.
 

David Roy

Well-Known Member
Nice report, I'm a bit more than a month into my Metro ownership with no real problems so it's good to hear these long term reports. Totally agree about the "kick", I've found that a touch of throttle at stop lights etc gets me started gentler and it's easy to take over with pedals. It can also make it difficult to maneuver in tight situations i.e. a sharp right angle onto a bridge with heavy ped/bike traffic and tight entrance/exit. Found that one out the hard way.
It took me at least a month to figure out how to ride this bike comfortably. One key is to use a light touch on a brake levers to temporarily cut the motor while still pedaling. I use this all the time when approaching intersections. It has become automatic whenever I am going to do a slow speed maneuver. I also always change the power level to zero when stopped. I’ve had the bike try to take off when backing up or once with a slight touch on the pedal. It doesn’t always happen but once was enough.
 

Mike's E-Bikes

Well-Known Member
There's detail on the topic in the Metro owners manual. Also, if you Google magnum's C7 display you'll find a video on how to change it. Magnums owners manual is available at their website if you don't have it.
 

vincent

Well-Known Member
I agree a lot of these cadence bikes the level one pas is around 12mph which is just flat out ridiculous and amazing to me these companies are still doing this

What in the world is the point of a 20mph bike or even a 28mph bike having level 1 out of 5 or 9 set at 12mph??
This is just laziness on the manufacturers side and I hope because of this laziness they start losing sales , they should

My bagibike is the same way and I will never buy another product from that company
Surface 604 was better although I still thought too fast in level 1 but I kept waiting on the 2019 to come out and finally gave up
But surface is programmable

I have definitely owned cadence bikes that were programmed much better than this , it can be done

Will be interesting to see if the suggestions mike made on changing things in the display will make a big difference
Please report back
 

David Roy

Well-Known Member
There's detail on the topic in the Metro owners manual. Also, if you Google magnum's C7 display you'll find a video on how to change it. Magnums owners manual is available at their website if you don't have it.
Thanks again Mike. This is what is says in my manual:

4.3) PARAMETER SETTINGS
Your e-bike parameter settings have all been factory set for your specific model and region. This includes the wheel and tire size, speed denomination (km/h or mph), power level and speed output.
In order to eliminate confusion the section to change these factory settings is available only to Magnum Bikes licensed dealers and is password protected.

I never thought to ask for the password. The video was very helpful. Here is the link for anyone else who is interested.
Magnum C7 parameter settings access
 

EbikeTestLab

New Member
Great review. I’ll be comparing the performance of the three different power settings on a Metro+ soon and will let you all know how much of a difference it makes in acceleration. I do know that the eco setting limits the max assist when in PAS 4 or lower but seems to be the same as normal or power in PAS 5 and 6.
 

David Roy

Well-Known Member
I followed the directions in the video link above and it worked like a charm. As Mike had surmised my bike was set to the highest power mode. I did short test rides in the “normal” and “eco” settings. It made a noticeable difference in the surge when starting up. Today I hope to do a longer ride in the eco mode to see what it’s like and possibly get a sense of the increased range potential. I’m sure it will take some getting used to. I’ll probably miss the surge now!
 

Bill Brikiatis

New Member
Thanks again Mike. This is what is says in my manual:

4.3) PARAMETER SETTINGS
Your e-bike parameter settings have all been factory set for your specific model and region. This includes the wheel and tire size, speed denomination (km/h or mph), power level and speed output.
In order to eliminate confusion the section to change these factory settings is available only to Magnum Bikes licensed dealers and is password protected.

I never thought to ask for the password. The video was very helpful. Here is the link for anyone else who is interested.
Magnum C7 parameter settings access
 

Bill Brikiatis

New Member
If you set it to eco, what it the effect? I assume that mine is set to normal. It's possible that I might like my "1" to be a little slower, but I'm not sure if I want to risk messing things up to try this. Also is the password the same for all Magnum Metros.
 

CSH

Active Member
Anyone have a Report on the "Eco" setting ride experience.

Especially from Stand still at a Red light......

- Gentle Start ?
- Lurching Start ?

Craig
 

Mike's E-Bikes

Well-Known Member
Anyone have a Report on the "Eco" setting ride experience.

Especially from Stand still at a Red light......

- Gentle Start ?
- Lurching Start ?

Craig
You can always use the throttle, and gently feather in the amount of assist you want during start, with the PAS level set to zero. My customers report doing that, and love that ability.
They move the Pas level to zero while waiting for the light to go green. Seems like a good approach to me.
 

vincent

Well-Known Member
I test rode a magnum last year and one a couple of years ago and level one was too fast for me, did not like how much power there is in that low setting

Would not call it lightning fast but quick to get to 13-14 miles an hour before it starts to cut out which in my opinion is too fast for level one

Having to turn down to zero and using throttle seems a dumb work around when magnum could just make the controller have level one and 2 slow like it should be

I thought the surface eBikes were a little more controlled in level one than magnum but do not think they are available anymore
 

CSH

Active Member
I followed the directions in the video link above and it worked like a charm. As Mike had surmised my bike was set to the highest power mode. I did short test rides in the “normal” and “eco” settings. It made a noticeable difference in the surge when starting up. Today I hope to do a longer ride in the eco mode to see what it’s like and possibly get a sense of the increased range potential. I’m sure it will take some getting used to. I’ll probably miss the surge now!
Hello David,

How would you describe the "Feel" of the ECO mode ?