Manhattan’s only e bike store closed down

#1
Was really taken by surprise to hear that NYCE wheels has permanently closed down. It’s a loss for us, the small e bike community and for the future of e biking in Ny.
They had a top A+ e bike mechanic -Izzy, and other great employers.
I was trying to find out why they closed , I had just visited them 2days earlier , saw the beautiful Stromer St2 LTD, and then yesterday I see the news on their website.
Anyone knows what happened ?? In NYC , we now have left only 2other e bike stores-Propel and Greenpath. There are a few other e bike stores in NYC but theyare catering towards the delivery e bikes and such.
Well, hopefully they will reopen ! The rents are indeed as sky high as Manhattan skyscrapers 🏙 or even higher , maybe that could be a reason why ...
 
#2
I just got back from NYC, I live in Los Angeles. I swear my son and I were counting ebikes compared to "acoustic" and it was about 60/40 split to acoustic. Surprised to hear NYCE closed and that there are so few stores.

Love NYC, but as soon as I landed back in LA I was glad to be home, excited to get back on my ebike, "cause the sun is shinin' all the time, looks like another perfect day....I love L.A.....WE LOVE IT!"
 
#3
Was really taken by surprise to hear that NYCE wheels has permanently closed down. It’s a loss for us, the small e bike community and for the future of e biking in Ny.
They had a top A+ e bike mechanic -Izzy, and other great employers.
I was trying to find out why they closed , I had just visited them 2days earlier , saw the beautiful Stromer St2 LTD, and then yesterday I see the news on their website.
Anyone knows what happened ?? In NYC , we now have left only 2other e bike stores-Propel and Greenpath. There are a few other e bike stores in NYC but theyare catering towards the delivery e bikes and such.
Well, hopefully they will reopen ! The rents are indeed as sky high as Manhattan skyscrapers 🏙 or even higher , maybe that could be a reason why ...
I was bummed to hear about this too. I'm not sure why they closed but, according to a post on Reddit, they're closed for good and are in the process of liquidating their remaining stock via their website.

@Court FYI in case you want to remove NYCeWheels from the shop directory.
 
#4
Running a bike shop is a risky business. Bike shop closures are the norm these days. Just like brick and mortar in general. The best indie coffee shop in town our just closed. The country is being reduced to huge boxes and direct to consumer. Both of these will likely be eliminated by amazon. All hail amazon! And remember alexa is listening....
 

Ken M

Active Member
#5
Sadly everyone seems to think low priced is always the way to buy. No one even considers quality / value in making a buying decision. Sure some brands like BMW and Mercedes can still differentiate in the auto industry but in the bike business everyone thinks all bikes are the same and few will educate themselves to know better. Obviously, any bike store must be cognizant of having prices that are very competitive with anything on the internet and they better know service (most people can't change the oil in their own cars so it's pretty obvious they are not going to be able to service an ebike). That said, they must not try to service every bike ever sold (there is far too much diversity of components and special tools to do it all).

The one factor that is hard for any brick & motor store to overcome is direct sales of the same accessories like helmets and lights. Large volume distributors will buy in huge bulk and negotiate shipping rates that small players can't match. While we think as consumers we are winning, it's a short term thing because when there is almost no competition the prices even from the big distributors will be high.
 
#6
Unfortunately for brick and mortar stores, the direct to consumer model has inherent price advantages by cutting out the retailer and wholesaler. It means a significantly lower price initially but usually inferior support after the sale.

In addition, higher priced e-bikes often lack value. Stromer case in point. What extra value do they offer? They use the smaller 26" wheels but offer no justification. They have no suspension on most models. No throttle. Their bikes are much heavier. Their top tube lcd is black and white not color like smart motion. They use a less expensive hub motor rather than the more expensive mid drive. Their combo bar/stem is inconvenient and expensive to replace. Geometry is standard across sizes rather than size specific. They offer higher capacity batteries but at a severely inflated price point. Their customer service in the US is abysmal. Worse than typical and it's typically very bad for direct to consumer.

At the very low end, with brands like ancheer and ride1up, there are severe compromises in battery capacity or in spec, for instance with the use of a six pole cadence sensor rather than 12 pole. Or, you get wonky gearing so the advertised top speed can't actually be achieved.

I don't see the consumer making the 'wrong' choices necessarily. The sweet spot in price vs performance is between $1700 and $4K. Not surprisingly this constitutes the bulk of sales.

And take a company like Rad. Their customer service is exemplary by ebike standards. Their fenders don't rattle. Their battery capacity is well above average. Their motors are relatively quiet. It's easy to find a demo or rental center (comparatively speaking). Their pricing is pretty phenomenal and they are still upgrading product on a near annual basis, usually in very tangible ways (not just superficial changes like color schemes). They are doing a lot of things right.

So there is plenty of evidence that consumers are helping good brands to grow. Juiced is a strange brand since they are trying so hard to push the performance and value envelope but don't have the R&D budget or foresight to create seamless, well integrated designs. They're shoving cheap batteries into huge poorly designed cases and "attaching" (I use that term loosely, pun intended) them to cheap frames while everyone's keeping their fingers crossed.

Want a civic with a viper v10 with rockbottom tier hit and miss phone support and no dealer to turn to?
Be my guest.

Point is, businesses have to adapt. Pining about the good ol' days won't get you very far. These days are not a time for moderation and reflection. It's one extreme or another; a reliable product with moderate power with great customer service from rad vs. low tier support and a big engine and the biggest batteries in the industry across the line in the industry from juiced.
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
#7
And take a company like Rad. Their customer service is exemplary by ebike standards. Their fenders don't rattle. Their battery capacity is well above average. Their motors are relatively quiet. It's easy to find a demo or rental center (comparatively speaking). Their pricing is pretty phenomenal and they are still upgrading product on a near annual basis, usually in very tangible ways (not just superficial changes like color schemes). They are doing a lot of things right.
Rad uses $12 cadence sensor.
Their batteries are generic and nothing special. A similar bike can be purchased from Alibaba for $600.
https://www.alibaba.com/product-detail/48V-750w-2018-big-power-fat_60768303381.html?

All Rad does is purchase bikes from China for $590 and use the remaining money for Facebook, Google marketing and customer service. They use Bafang hub motors that is sold in millions in Asia.
There is absolutely nothing special about their bike. It's a very average bike marketed well.

So there is plenty of evidence that consumers are helping good brands to grow. Juiced is a strange brand since they are trying so hard to push the performance and value envelope but don't have the R&D budget or foresight to create seamless, well integrated designs. They're shoving cheap batteries into huge poorly designed cases and "attaching" (I use that term loosely, pun intended) them to cheap frames and everyone's keeping their fingers crossed.
You have never owned a Juiced bike and it is completely nonsensical to just spew out garbage. Their batteries hold up well and they do offer support.
Your comments just shows how people can be envious and try to bring you down when you are succeeding. Juiced is really growing leaps and bounds. Have you seen their warehouse?


Juiced completely changed the scooter market. Super 73 and others have taken a beating after the Scrambler came out. Here is a customer review.


Their frames are well-made. Even after an accident, the frame was completely fine. Check out this thread (I am sharing all the links so readers can gauge for themselves, not listen to some envious posts by some random people)

https://electricbikereview.com/forum/threads/beware-the-bicycle-lane.16177/


NYCE Wheels was marketed well Peter was part of the team. They served the market but a lot depends on the team running the store. After he left, their team kind of scattered a bit. If the funding owners are not used to the market changes, the store can fold.


Their Video channel is still getting lot of views.

https://www.youtube.com/user/nycewheels/videos
 
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#8
Why so critical of Rad? You sound like a very negative person. :)

Let's use common sense here. Rad's entire line is $1700 to $1800. JuicedBikes' line starts at $1700 up to $3500. Obviously, with a much higher average price, they are selling fewer bikes. Yet their complaints thread is 4x as long. Why do you think that is? Common sense leads us to one simple conclusion: THEY ARE LESS RELIABLE. DUH!

You take my use of common sense reasoning and impute all sorts of ridiculous emotional traits: hate, envy, etc.

As I have stated before juiced was my first choice without question. I was hoping that with their new cs rep and a new round of bicycles, their previous problems with reliability would be a thing of the past. WRONG. They ghost on a customer with bent frame who documented the problem in video with a shop mechanic present. They didn't even contest the customer's paypal claim because they knew they were wrong and didn't have the courage to own up to it. FAIL.

A crank arm falls off. I have NEVER in 30 years of bicycle commuting, ever heard of a documented complaint of a CRANK ARM FALLING OFF A BICYCLE! Much less a brand new bicycle.

Am I supposed to just ignore this? What kind of an idiot would consider these problems to be irrelevant. Look at the bikes recently pictured. Dude's battery is tied up with bungies, zip ties and covered with saran wrap. Does that give the impression of a reliable battery?!? Someone's sticking their head in the sand and it's not me.

So, here's the deal: praise juiced or be accused of being a troll. Got it. Admire rad's design and be accused of being a troll. Got it.

Why don't you just write my posts for me that way your feelings will never be hurt. Ever. Wouldn't that be nice? A world where the most severe life threatening design flaws are ignored just so you can be happy.

Oh, and bike's holding up after a crash? What's unusual about that?!? I've crashed several times on my road bike and mtb. My bikes held up just fine. Both bikes cost well under $1K. Are you saying a bike that doesn't disintegrate after a crash means that it's a great bike? It doesn't. That is an extremely minimal standard that just about every bike should meet.

The camp scrambler review: he's ridden the bike twice. Fine, I suppose. but someone else's crank fell right off first ride. So let's just disregard that.

Never mind that a rip current s that tora calls a rocket can't even make it up a six feet embankment, nowhere near what could be called a "hill" with throttle. It wasn't exactly a steep embankment either. The jb rep still had to pedal. The motor sound awful. The fenders rattled. It looked, performed, sounded like a cheap bike regardless of anything tora said. On a flat paved trail, yes, I'm sure it's fine. In any sort of challenging terrain, forget it.

I don't know what rad spends. I do know that their customers are much happier with their customer service and of course you see far fewer problems with their bikes, which is a lot more than jb can say.

JB has a new warehouse? Do any of their customers who have not received bikes, did not get accessories, got the wrong size or wrong color or had components fall off, or power cut out, or spokes break or were sent a defective frame or controller care about their "new warehouse?" That doesn't say anything about their quality or customer service. Your arguments are so illogical and so emotionally driven it clouds your judgment to a laughable degree.

Again, let's talk facts that are RELEVANT. A new warehouse is no indication of reliability, durability or performance.

And how do you define "lots of views?" Is 927 a lot of views? If you say so. If 927 is "a lot" what is GCN getting? Your attempts at hyperbole are embarrassing. The loss of a retail ebike store is unfortunate, but as I said before, there's no time to mourn. Only time to adapt.

I've said it before and I'll say it again since it appears to be necessary. I WANT JUICED TO SUCCEED. I want them to build the most reliable highest performing bike on the planet. I want that to be the case for every brand. But just because I want it doesn't mean it will happen. They are clearly taking shortcuts and their QC is abysmal.

So, enjoy life with your head stuck in the sand or somewhere else. That doesn't change the facts. Facts are not your enemy, quit trying to bury them. Facts help you to make decisions. Facts protect you. They're not there to hurt you. Make friends with reality. Good luck, whoever you are.
 
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#9
BTW, the bike that ravi linked to is a low step which looks nothing like a rad. It's an M2S clone, which is not a bad thing necessarily. I don't have much interest in their line of bikes btw.

Did you factor in cost of shipping btw?

And why do you think extra money spent on customer service is a bad thing? It tells you where your priorities are: in line with juiced, selling poorly designed batteries with no real customer service to back it up. No thanks. But good luck with that. You see the results on this forum. 28 pages and counting.
 

Ken M

Active Member
#10
My response to comments about Rad and Juiced. Both are taking slightly different approaches to direct sales of ebikes but both do have only hub drive line-ups. Personally I think hub drives (both geared and direct) are better for most urban riding because they do not suffer from mechanical inefficiencies of the drive train on a bike at higher speeds. Mid drives are superior for mtn / offroad ebikes partly because at low speeds the gear ratios are an advantage for them.

If you want my opinion to who is doing the best direct to consumer ebike products it's Power In Motion. Their ebikes have quality configurations and the simple drive system should prove to be extremely reliably. They one short coming is battery capacity but they did recently release a 500wh battery pack.

I think it's very challenging to have great quality control when you have your ebikes contract manufactured in China. You can't be at the factory 100% of the time watching every finished bike go in the box. Most Chinese made product quality is improving except for the lowest cost products that are all disposable junk in my opinion. Maybe the slightly more conservative ebikes that Rad has in their line-up vs the Juiced Cycles models helps them sustain a higher quality level. I believe Tora is very passionate about quality and spends a lot of time traveling to China to influence the attention to detail at the factories but he can't always be there so some issues will get to customers.

I believe Stromer makes very high quality ebikes but given their "compliance" with EU regulations their hub drive motor system falls short of exciting performance here in the US. I believe I was one of the 1st people to ride the ST5 when it was introduced to the US market in Denver. It's a very nice bike but it is simply over-priced relative to what you get (the tires certainly made up for much of the shortcomings as they were fabulous performance tires from Pirelli). There really is no reason for that bike to be over $4,000 but Stromer wants to push their reputation as much as possible as a very serious premium brand. That's fine but at $10,000 the entire ST5 should be carbon - frame, rims, bars, fork, and seatpost. It should also have something like a 52V / 40A drive system so the performance is as remarkable as the configuration (sadly the EU feels that 250W is the limited power an ebike should have).

I think some of the quality issues many of the 2nd tier brands suffer from is due to them trying to piece together a programmed Pedal Assist System (PAS) that mimics the high-end mid drives (but those drive systems have issues as well because they have too much priority on torque so weaker riders never really get the higher assistance they want or need.
 
#11
My response to comments about Rad and Juiced. Both are taking slightly different approaches to direct sales of ebikes but both do have only hub drive line-ups. Personally I think hub drives (both geared and direct) are better for most urban riding because they do not suffer from mechanical inefficiencies of the drive train on a bike at higher speeds. Mid drives are superior for mtn / offroad ebikes partly because at low speeds the gear ratios are an advantage for them.

If you want my opinion to who is doing the best direct to consumer ebike products it's Power In Motion. Their ebikes have quality configurations and the simple drive system should prove to be extremely reliably. They one short coming is battery capacity but they did recently release a 500wh battery pack.

I think it's very challenging to have great quality control when you have your ebikes contract manufactured in China. You can't be at the factory 100% of the time watching every finished bike go in the box. Most Chinese made product quality is improving except for the lowest cost products that are all disposable junk in my opinion. Maybe the slightly more conservative ebikes that Rad has in their line-up vs the Juiced Cycles models helps them sustain a higher quality level. I believe Tora is very passionate about quality and spends a lot of time traveling to China to influence the attention to detail at the factories but he can't always be there so some issues will get to customers.

I believe Stromer makes very high quality ebikes but given their "compliance" with EU regulations their hub drive motor system falls short of exciting performance here in the US. I believe I was one of the 1st people to ride the ST5 when it was introduced to the US market in Denver. It's a very nice bike but it is simply over-priced relative to what you get (the tires certainly made up for much of the shortcomings as they were fabulous performance tires from Pirelli). There really is no reason for that bike to be over $4,000 but Stromer wants to push their reputation as much as possible as a very serious premium brand. That's fine but at $10,000 the entire ST5 should be carbon - frame, rims, bars, fork, and seatpost. It should also have something like a 52V / 40A drive system so the performance is as remarkable as the configuration (sadly the EU feels that 250W is the limited power an ebike should have).

I think some of the quality issues many of the 2nd tier brands suffer from is due to them trying to piece together a programmed Pedal Assist System (PAS) that mimics the high-end mid drives (but those drive systems have issues as well because they have too much priority on torque so weaker riders never really get the higher assistance they want or need.
A fair and balanced assessment of Stromer. The value simply isn't there.

And there is an inherent tradeoff between quality and quantity. Higher quality means tighter tolerances, smaller batches, more expense and therefore higher cost. Juiced can't continue to meet demand AND produce bikes at high tolerances. What you get now are large batches, lower quality, lower cost. It's mind boggling that people can't grasp this.

I've only ridden mid drives but bosch mid drives generate effortless power and speed on the road and off. Look forward to demoing hub motors as well.
 
#12
I know from exp. a lot of new e bikers will look on this forums( and there aren’t many of this forums)so we bear a great responsibility educating , criticizing or validating that yea some of this brands are indeed worth it. I often buy based on reviews, or user inputs. The R&M amazing quality , yea is definitely worth it, Stromer hmmm not soo much( If you want to be the Swiss watch, not there yet !) , the Bulls very okay, Easy motion great , And many other companies are great or not there yet . This is just getting off the ground.
The dealership education is definitely missing in many stores- this bikes have computers, electronics, are not supposed to be wash in certain areas, great danger is ridden in rain, w/o helmet , always at top speed and so on. The learning curve is quite long and only a hands on person is satisfied with his e bike. Otherwise many trips to dealer for totally worthless reason.
Changing a flat, adjusting Omni settings in case of the Stromer bike, improper cable connection, this things need to be learned by the users....

Is Nikola Tesla would have been in our era , he would have made the best e bike , well is only 100years after his time that we are getting electrified 😉 and it is an exciting present.
 

Ken M

Active Member
#13
A fair and balanced assessment of Stromer. The value simply isn't there.

And there is an inherent tradeoff between quality and quantity. Higher quality means tighter tolerances, smaller batches, more expense and therefore higher cost. Juiced can't continue to meet demand AND produce bikes at high tolerances. What you get now are large batches, lower quality, lower cost. It's mind boggling that people can't grasp this.

I've only ridden mid drives but bosch mid drives generate effortless power and speed on the road and off. Look forward to demoing hub motors as well.
Bosch did one thing with their mid-drive design that I think was very smart - the have a smaller chain ring spinning at 2.5 X the crank RPM. This provides them a mechanical efficiency advantage vs other mid drives at higher speeds. This is simple but seems to be overlooked by everyone that owns a mid drive ebike (I own two so I'm not a hater) when you are riding fast and on a large front and small rear chain ring you are in effect not transmitting your crank or motor torque to the rear wheel efficiently - a 44T front and 11T rear will only transfer 25% of the torque to the rear wheel. While hub drives may have lower torque because some lack internal gearing they are applying the generated torque directly to the rear wheel regardless of speed. The net effect is that at higher speeds, say above 20mph, typically mid drives are providing more assist than mid drives.

You have to ride differently on a hub drive bike to really perceive the difference. Most people slow down on hills to minimize the gear ratio issue with mid drives, but if you ride both a hub drive and a mid drive with the intent of maintaining a high speed up hills you will soon discover you will be able so sustain a higher speed on a hub drive ebike (at least on one the is not an EU spec'd hub drive).
 

Ken M

Active Member
#14
I know from exp. a lot of new e bikers will look on this forums( and there aren’t many of this forums)so we bear a great responsibility educating , criticizing or validating that yea some of this brands are indeed worth it. I often buy based on reviews, or user inputs. The R&M amazing quality , yea is definitely worth it, Stromer hmmm not soo much( If you want to be the Swiss watch, not there yet !) , the Bulls very okay, Easy motion great , And many other companies are great or not there yet . This is just getting off the ground.
The dealership education is definitely missing in many stores- this bikes have computers, electronics, are not supposed to be wash in certain areas, great danger is ridden in rain, w/o helmet , always at top speed and so on. The learning curve is quite long and only a hands on person is satisfied with his e bike. Otherwise many trips to dealer for totally worthless reason.
Changing a flat, adjusting Omni settings in case of the Stromer bike, improper cable connection, this things need to be learned by the users....

Is Nikola Tesla would have been in our era , he would have made the best e bike , well is only 100years after his time that we are getting electrified 😉 and it is an exciting present.
I would hope that most ebike buyers want to learn enough about the product to at least perform most of the routine maintenance - fixing flats, tuning the derailleur, lubricating the chain, etc. A lot of people are just busy trying to get home to watch TV they don't have the time to learn anything unless the Kardashians are giving them advice. In effect, many are just too lazy to learn new things, yet they'll complain if a service shop needs to charge $50/hr to service their bike to remain in business. In other words they don't want to pay anyone that learned the skill they are too lazy to do themselves.
 
#15
Was really taken by surprise to hear that NYCE wheels has permanently closed down. It’s a loss for us, the small e bike community and for the future of e biking in Ny.
They had a top A+ e bike mechanic -Izzy, and other great employers.
I was trying to find out why they closed , I had just visited them 2days earlier , saw the beautiful Stromer St2 LTD, and then yesterday I see the news on their website.
Anyone knows what happened ?? In NYC , we now have left only 2other e bike stores-Propel and Greenpath. There are a few other e bike stores in NYC but theyare catering towards the delivery e bikes and such.
Well, hopefully they will reopen ! The rents are indeed as sky high as Manhattan skyscrapers 🏙 or even higher , maybe that could be a reason why ...
Damn. Hadn’t heard that. I shopped there in 2017 before buying my bike at Sleek in Tarrytown. They were super helpful. Bummer.
 
#16
Getting back to the topic at hand, I think NYCeWheels might have closed because the e-bike market has spread out further than a few specialty stores in Manhattan. These days, the majority of the human powered bike stores are also carrying e-bikes. They may not stock the quantity of an e-bike specialty store, but if you look on line at their sites, they have most well known brands available to order within a reasonable time frame. Also, the important components of an e-bike, besides the motor and battery, are what these dealers have been experts in for many years. I'm sure the e-bike manufactures are thrilled to get their products into the mainstream market of these well established bike shops thus enabling their merchandise to gain wider distribution.
True, a couple of years back when I was shopping for my e-bike purchase, the first three places I went to, after inquiring at my local bike store, was Propel, Greenpath and NYCeWheels. Then I realized that places like Danny's, Brickwell, Trek etc also carried e-bikes. Even my local shop, who at first said, he's has no interest in selling them, has three e-bikes now in his front window. So my belief is that the e-bike craze has spread into mainstream bicycle retail outlets of Manhattan and surrounding areas making the specialty shop of NYCeWheels not so special anymore. Or it could be one of the other countless reasons why a small business in our city decided to close down.
 
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#17
Getting back to the topic at hand, I think NYCeWheels might have closed because the e-bike market has spread out further than a few specialty stores in Manhattan. These days, the majority of the major human powered bike stores are also carrying e-bikes. They may not stock the quantity of an e-bike specialty store, but if you look on line at their sites, they have most major brands available to order within a reasonable time frame. Also, the major components of an e-bike, besides the motor and battery, are what these dealers have been experts in for many years. I'm sure the e-bike manufactures are thrilled to get their products into the mainstream market of these well established bike shops thus enabling their merchandise to gain wider distribution.
True, a couple of years back when I was shopping for my e-bike purchase, the first three places I went to, after inquiring at my local bike store, was Propel, Greenpath and NYCeWheels. Then I realized that places like Danny's, Brickwell, Trek etc also carried e-bikes. Even my local shop, who at first said, he's has no interest in selling them, has three e-bikes now in his front window. So my belief is that the e-bike craze has spread into mainstream bicycle retail outlets of Manhattan and surrounding areas making the specialty shop of NYCeWheels not so special anymore. Or it could be one of the other countless reasons why a small business in our city decided to close down.
On point.

One of my bikes is a Tern Vektron. In 2017 I was hoping to see one in person before buying, so I was monitoring NYCE’s site which described ‘out-of-stock’ status. I bought one elsewhere, and some time later stopped by NYCE to find one on the floor. Their site hadn’t been updated ....

Now REI carries all the Tern ebikes as well as others. Manhattan and DC both have REI stores, which at one time were found in mostly exurban locations. Oh, and it appears that as a member I’d get a significant discount as compared to what I paid in 2017.

At one bike shop after the other I’m seeing floor space dedicated to high-recognition brands like Trek, Giant, Specialized and Cannondale. There are still some holdout shops, but they have a strong local following and one has expanded with purely mechanical bikes and repair, kind of bucking the trend there.
 
#18
I don't own a Rad but was seriously considering one and if it had been in stock most likely would have purchased it. however I found out about the return policies and ran away, if you cancel your order before the bike has even shipped they knock you 100 dollars charge. If you return the bike they have a restock fee of up to 25% and they make you pay shipping both ways. Not for me! A local e bike shop in Eugene where I got refuses to work on their bikes, any other brand ok but no Rads period. I ended up with Evelo who doesn't sell as many but their customer service is exemplary in every respect. I tried one bike which came with no shipping cost and returned it, no shipping to me to return sent FedeX to pick up the bike no charge period. Purchased my Aurora and it was also shipped free of charge with a 100 dollar gift certificate and they sent it for the same price I had paid for the less expensive model I returned which turned out to be a 800 dollar discount! You couldn't ask for more and they return phone calls same day and are extremely helpful. To top it off the bike has been trouble free, fast, quiet, and a real quality product!
 
#19
That is really too bad about NYCE wheels. I know the pain all too well watching Blue Monkey (retail) go down. Peter, if you're reading this, hit me up on bluemonkeybicycles.com, get in contact with me. I'm sure we'd have a lot to talk about.

Local retailers are on the front lines of the revolution, and believe me there are many, many guns pointed at the front lines.
 

Bruce Arnold

Well-Known Member
#20
That is really too bad about NYCE wheels. I know the pain all too well watching Blue Monkey (retail) go down. Peter, if you're reading this, hit me up on bluemonkeybicycles.com, get in contact with me. I'm sure we'd have a lot to talk about.

Local retailers are on the front lines of the revolution, and believe me there are many, many guns pointed at the front lines.
Are you saying Blue Monkey has closed? I hope not - your shop was an asset to the whole ebike community, not to mention the Utah area. Got so much out of your videos, especially when I was first sorting all this out.