MIK racks on the Nevo

JohnnyRhino

New Member
Hi,

We are looking at getting a Nevo for long-distance touring but I'm concerned about the rack situation. We don't like the idea of having our panniers always connected (which seems to be the only option) and having the adapter between them. So, I am wondering if there are panniers available that will connect to the rack in a 'normal' way so that each pannier is separate? Or is there some sort of conversion kit available, other than the adapter plate so that we could use our existing panniers?

I'm also wondering where people generally mount things like water bottle cages and other touring bags as I am surprised by the lack of mount points on a bike with the term 'touring' in the title. I guess I am looking for inspiration before we make the purchase.

thanks,

John
 

dblhelix

Active Member
Hi,

We are looking at getting a Nevo for long-distance touring but I'm concerned about the rack situation. We don't like the idea of having our panniers always connected (which seems to be the only option) and having the adapter between them. So, I am wondering if there are panniers available that will connect to the rack in a 'normal' way so that each pannier is separate? Or is there some sort of conversion kit available, other than the adapter plate so that we could use our existing panniers?

I'm also wondering where people generally mount things like water bottle cages and other touring bags as I am surprised by the lack of mount points on a bike with the term 'touring' in the title. I guess I am looking for inspiration before we make the purchase.

thanks,

John
You can use Ortleib panniers w/o an adapter just clip on to the top rail. Unfortunately, there is no dedicated pannier rail.

I use a hydration pack, so the lack of water bottle mounts is not an issue. The design (step-through) and the external PowerPack limit attachment points , no doubt.

I rode a Nevo cross-country (US). If you could describe your plans a bit more, I can probably set expectations for you.
 

JohnnyRhino

New Member
Thanks dblhelix.

Our plans are to spend up to 3 months cycling in Spain, England and Ireland starting next May. We will fly into Spain and buy the bike there (the Nevo is for my wife, I'll be bringing my non-e-bike). This way we only need to worry about shipping the battery back to Australia and not both directions but it means we need to be setup before getting the bike to experiment with.
 

dblhelix

Active Member
Thanks dblhelix.

Our plans are to spend up to 3 months cycling in Spain, England and Ireland starting next May. We will fly into Spain and buy the bike there (the Nevo is for my wife, I'll be bringing my non-e-bike). This way we only need to worry about shipping the battery back to Australia and not both directions but it means we need to be setup before getting the bike to experiment with.
Sounds like a lot of fun. Jealous!

As you suspect, when R&M designate a model as “touring” it merely means chain/derailleur as compared to belt/IGH. There are two descriptors I ignore when it comes to ebikes: “sporty” and “touring.”

Tourers tend to stay away from proprietary components. The front fork on this bike has a proprietary Suntour skewer. All R&M models do, except for models with the Fox upgrade path. When you pick up your Nevo, make sure that your dealer’s service department has greased up the skewer. Mine seized, and I have been told by multiple sources that this is not uncommon. It was so severe that it could not be removed without putting it in a stand first for the rubber mallet whack. Imagine flatting and not being able to remove the skewer!!

Skewer, cont. Make sure to watch the YouTube video on removing/installing the skewer yourself (you’ll find at least two). Not all bike shops have experience with Suntour products. I’ve had mechanics ask me to remove it; come out with a worried look and the retaining clip in his hand; or refuse service in fear of responsibility for a “rebuild.” Too many revolutions unscrewing sometimes results in a shower of small parts, apparently. My dealer’s service dept mentioned that customers have brought back the skewer to be put together after too much fiddling.

Seizing, small parts in the dirt .... a touring nightmare. Familiarity and pre-trip maintenance is key.

I would think about whether a tire swap is in order. There are multiple threads on this site comparing Super Moto X to Rock Razor and Smart Sams in the Schwalbe line. The quick summary is that Super Moto X is favored for road-dominated with light off-road. No matter your choice, be aware that getting these tires off and on the rim is a chore. Not a joke: you might want to practice, bearing in mind the sub-optimal conditions “on the road,”

The headset has a “block lock” feature that restricts the range of motion of your handlebars. I assume the tightening torque is not very high bc on two occasions (two different R&M models) the turning sweep was highly restricted on one side while generous on the other. It’s not your handlebars relative to the tires but both together. The adjustment screw is small (3mm IIRC) so make sure your multitool has all the sizes you might need ....

Why a “block lock?” Responses have been unconvincing (prevent cable break, prevent fork crowns from hitting downtube). My guess: it’s to improve bike stability while standing. If we are three meals away from revolution, the R&M is one kickstand away from lethal weapon status. Long story short, I had a kickstand break, what a misery. A Trek ebike dealer kindly donated a kickstand. It looked very similar to the Pletscher, but the RM instantly tipped over and kickstand #2 went with it. The Trek dealer gave me another one. I didn’t have the heart to tell him that it broke 20min later. It was only when I put on the OEM Pletscher that reliable kickstand functionality was restored. I hate to say this, but if I were to tour again with an R&M, I’d consider the weight penalty of a spare kickstand. Life really sucks when you are camping for a week with a kickstandless R&M. I should mention that at least you are fortunate that the “touring” model is the lightest model.

Charging - luckily you will get the 6A charger which is currently the fastest in the Bosch line-up. If you anticipate charging during the day, you’ll want to keep it. If you are in a hotel every night, the lighter 4A charger will be sufficient. I took two with me, one for each battery. The 6A is not available in the US. People often ask if they will need a 3rd battery, which depends on your daily anticipated distance/terrain. Feel free to DM if you have questions.

The Nevo will need increased chain cleaning, wear check and replacement as compared to your bike. There has been tremendous variation in self-reported chain/cassette life at this site, so at least put some thought into whether these parts will be accessible to you over 1500km-2000km intervals as a precaution.

Brand new Bosch components are generally trouble-free. For rainy conditions I’ve never done much more than protect the Intuvia/Nyon button pad with a plastic bag as needed overnight. One thing: I do keep a very small bottle of rubbing alcohol with me that I use with a q-tip to clean the contacts on the Intuvia mount and display. Summer 2018 I suffered the well-documented inability to switch between ride modes until I cleaned the contacts after a dusty ride.

If you have the diameter-adjusting inserts to clip on Ortlieb panniers, remove them for the Nevo rack.

There is a trim piece at the lower end of the optional battery assembly that is attached solely by adhesive. Watch for it to come loose.

I’ll add more as I think of it. Feel free to ask about specific issues on your mind.
 
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Chris Nolte

Well-Known Member
Excellent feedback @dblhelix ! Thank you for your thoroughness.

@JohnnyRhino sounds like a fun trip. I don’t want to complicate things for you but I have two small points of feedback. The Bosch motor in Spain is different than that in Australia so it might not be as easy to get support when you bring it home since the AUS Bosch distributor is unable to provide warranty replacement. I know this kind of stinks. Another challenge you should research beforehand is shipping the battery. One consideration could be buying the bike in Australia and renting a battery in Spain. This could save you a lot of money and make long term support easier.
 

dblhelix

Active Member
Excellent feedback @dblhelix ! Thank you for your thoroughness.

@JohnnyRhino sounds like a fun trip. I don’t want to complicate things for you but I have two small points of feedback. The Bosch motor in Spain is different than that in Australia so it might not be as easy to get support when you bring it home since the AUS Bosch distributor is unable to provide warranty replacement. I know this kind of stinks. Another challenge you should research beforehand is shipping the battery. One consideration could be buying the bike in Australia and renting a battery in Spain. This could save you a lot of money and make long term support easier.
What is the difference b/t Spanish and Australian motors? What about the Europeans who ship their bikes here and rent batteries from your shop? Are they unable to get service if they have problems while visiting?
 

Chris Nolte

Well-Known Member
It’s the same as the US. 20mph or 32kph in Australia and 15mph or 25kph Spain. We can perform some service, but the respective countries don’t have the same motors available for warranty if it comes down to it. That’s the main thing. Sorry I wasn’t clear.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
I modified the rear rack on a Nevo that I owned by adding a lower pannier rail on each side. Here are two photos showing that customization I did. Aluminum rods with battery terminal ends, crimped, epoxied and panted with matte black. I placed the rails low enough to allow for a trunk bag in the middle and an Ortlieb pannier on each side.

20180725_063624.jpg
1546792334815.png
 

JohnnyRhino

New Member
It’s the same as the US. 20mph or 32kph in Australia and 15mph or 25kph Spain. We can perform some service, but the respective countries don’t have the same motors available for warranty if it comes down to it. That’s the main thing. Sorry I wasn’t clear.
Actually, Australia has a 25km/hr restriction as well. So, might be the same motor.
We are probably going to buy one in Australia now and fly with it and hire or buy a motor when we land.
 

JohnnyRhino

New Member
Sounds like a lot of fun. Jealous!

As you suspect, when R&M designate a model as “touring” it merely means chain/derailleur as compared to belt/IGH. There are two descriptors I ignore when it comes to ebikes: “sporty” and “touring.”

Tourers tend to stay away from proprietary components. The front fork on this bike has a proprietary Suntour skewer. All R&M models do, except for models with the Fox upgrade path. When you pick up your Nevo, make sure that your dealer’s service department has greased up the skewer. Mine seized, and I have been told by multiple sources that this is not uncommon. It was so severe that it could not be removed without putting it in a stand first for the rubber mallet whack. Imagine flatting and not being able to remove the skewer!!

Skewer, cont. Make sure to watch the YouTube video on removing/installing the skewer yourself (you’ll find at least two). Not all bike shops have experience with Suntour products. I’ve had mechanics ask me to remove it; come out with a worried look and the retaining clip in his hand; or refuse service in fear of responsibility for a “rebuild.” Too many revolutions unscrewing sometimes results in a shower of small parts, apparently. My dealer’s service dept mentioned that customers have brought back the skewer to be put together after too much fiddling.

Seizing, small parts in the dirt .... a touring nightmare. Familiarity and pre-trip maintenance is key.

I would think about whether a tire swap is in order. There are multiple threads on this site comparing Super Moto X to Rock Razor and Smart Sams in the Schwalbe line. The quick summary is that Super Moto X is favored for road-dominated with light off-road. No matter your choice, be aware that getting these tires off and on the rim is a chore. Not a joke: you might want to practice, bearing in mind the sub-optimal conditions “on the road,”

The headset has a “block lock” feature that restricts the range of motion of your handlebars. I assume the tightening torque is not very high bc on two occasions (two different R&M models) the turning sweep was highly restricted on one side while generous on the other. It’s not your handlebars relative to the tires but both together. The adjustment screw is small (3mm IIRC) so make sure your multitool has all the sizes you might need ....

Why a “block lock?” Responses have been unconvincing (prevent cable break, prevent fork crowns from hitting downtube). My guess: it’s to improve bike stability while standing. If we are three meals away from revolution, the R&M is one kickstand away from lethal weapon status. Long story short, I had a kickstand break, what a misery. A Trek ebike dealer kindly donated a kickstand. It looked very similar to the Pletscher, but the RM instantly tipped over and kickstand #2 went with it. The Trek dealer gave me another one. I didn’t have the heart to tell him that it broke 20min later. It was only when I put on the OEM Pletscher that reliable kickstand functionality was restored. I hate to say this, but if I were to tour again with an R&M, I’d consider the weight penalty of a spare kickstand. Life really sucks when you are camping for a week with a kickstandless R&M. I should mention that at least you are fortunate that the “touring” model is the lightest model.

Charging - luckily you will get the 6A charger which is currently the fastest in the Bosch line-up. If you anticipate charging during the day, you’ll want to keep it. If you are in a hotel every night, the lighter 4A charger will be sufficient. I took two with me, one for each battery. The 6A is not available in the US. People often ask if they will need a 3rd battery, which depends on your daily anticipated distance/terrain. Feel free to DM if you have questions.

The Nevo will need increased chain cleaning, wear check and replacement as compared to your bike. There has been tremendous variation in self-reported chain/cassette life at this site, so at least put some thought into whether these parts will be accessible to you over 1500km-2000km intervals as a precaution.

Brand new Bosch components are generally trouble-free. For rainy conditions I’ve never done much more than protect the Intuvia/Nyon button pad with a plastic bag as needed overnight. One thing: I do keep a very small bottle of rubbing alcohol with me that I use with a q-tip to clean the contacts on the Intuvia mount and display. Summer 2018 I suffered the well-documented inability to switch between ride modes until I cleaned the contacts after a dusty ride.

If you have the diameter-adjusting inserts to clip on Ortlieb panniers, remove them for the Nevo rack.

There is a trim piece at the lower end of the optional battery assembly that is attached solely by adhesive. Watch for it to come loose.

I’ll add more as I think of it. Feel free to ask about specific issues on your mind.
Thanks for this detailed feedback. Given all of the above, would you recommend this bike for touring then or should we look further afield?
 

JohnnyRhino

New Member
I modified the rear rack on a Nevo that I owned by adding a lower pannier rail on each side. Here are two photos showing that customization I did. Aluminum rods with battery terminal ends, crimped, epoxied and panted with matte black. I placed the rails low enough to allow for a trunk bag in the middle and an Ortlieb pannier on each side.

View attachment 40801 View attachment 40802
That's a sweet mod. I might have to replicate that.
 

David Berry

Well-Known Member
You can use Ortleib panniers w/o an adapter just clip on to the top rail. Unfortunately, there is no dedicated pannier rail.
Johnny …
Here is an Ortlieb E-Mate pannier attached to my Homage. Unfortunately, its design is incompatible with fitting a trunk bag. This is because trunk bags tend to spread outwards beyond the rack whilst panniers, as here, often extend above it, each taking over the other's space!
rm_homage_pannier_x.jpg


Until I follow Richard's workaround by adding proper pannier attachment tubes to the rack (far more difficult on a Homage than on a Nevo), I will have to choose either trunk bag or panniers.

Also note how the aluminium rack tube has been worn (X) by a trunk bag with Racktime attachment – hard plastic rubbing on soft metal. I now use Velcro attachments.
… David
 
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Chris Nolte

Well-Known Member
Sorry about the mixup. I think New Zealand has the 20mph limit. I do think it would be better to buy it in your local region though.

Great rack mod @Alaskan!
 

dblhelix

Active Member
@David Berry : Come on R&M, it can't be that difficult!

Apparently it is. I noticed the following rear “carrier” options for the 2020 Delite:

- pannier bracket (up to 5kg) vs
- solid MIK system fixed to the frame

That pannier option does not look very useful. I don’t understand why they don’t integrate a pannier rail with the platform rack.
 
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Cerby

New Member
well, it is not a banal solution.
- the pannier bracket is mounted over the suspension. It cannot be too heavy (full load). It will affect the suspension itself especially if with air.
- the bag brackets are in the swinging arm (before the suspension) and they can carry more weight.
in fact many cargo bikes do not have suspensions.
But this is not our friend's problem because the Nevo has no rear suspension and I really like the Alaskan solutions.
 

dblhelix

Active Member
Thanks for this detailed feedback. Given all of the above, would you recommend this bike for touring then or should we look further afield?
As I understand it, you will be on a non-electric bike and your wife on the Nevo. She will like the upright position, and hopefully you’ll enjoy the challenge of keeping up with her. I chose the Nevo for the Rohloff/belt option, but I do have a Deore drivetrain on another bike. I have had no problem with ascents, albeit a little easier with the Rohloff. The Nevo, like the other RMs, is quite sturdy, so she should feel stable and safe. I think the Nevo is a good option for you provided that you keep your daily distance to 100km or less and take along the 6A charger for a boost over lunch. I did a couple of days with a riding partner who was not on an ebike this past summer. He had trouble with the longer distances with ascents that of course became easier for me. OTOH, charging over lunch made for an longer break than we would have liked with the 4A charger and quicker pace.

New bike, new Bosch motor, no worries on this front. The Nevo option is solid as long as you monitor/maintain front skewer and chain. I’d maximize flat protection if possible.

The are only two negatives to consider. The RM line is just big/heavy, not going to mince words here. On my touring routes, bike-specific sections are sometimes difficult where you are expected to lift your bike, use a narrow rail and so on. I’ve been through damaged sections where you are expected to lift your bike over your head. Other ebikes are heavy, but RMs are extra heavy and long.

If I were in your position, I would also consider that the 2019/20 Nevo will have the Gen2 motor. It’s the end of the line, whereas other RM models and models from other brands will have the newer Gen4. From a touring perspective, if your wife were to run out of juice, the Gen4 should be easier to pedal on with. If the Nevo is a trip-specific purchase, you might be able to overlook the older motor and expected wear and tear that will depreciate the bike rapidly.

If I wanted the Gates belt/Rohloff, I would stick with R&M. I haven’t researched the 2020 models across brands yet, but reading about certain (lighter) models with a 625wh Powertube + 500wh Powerpack option certainly is worth a second look. Less charging and less weight is always good. So I might put the Nevo in my top 3 but if you have the time, look to see if you can fill the other two slots with contenders. It’s really about your priorities and style of tour you have planned.
 

Mapachin

New Member
I modified the rear rack on a Nevo that I owned by adding a lower pannier rail on each side. Here are two photos showing that customization I did. Aluminum rods with battery terminal ends, crimped, epoxied and panted with matte black. I placed the rails low enough to allow for a trunk bag in the middle and an Ortlieb pannier on each side.

View attachment 40801 View attachment 40802
Waoo ! This is a very simple and smart way to solve the issue of panniers versus rack bag incompatibility. is it holding good? Thanks for sharing.
 

Mapachin

New Member
Thanks Alaskan. very interesting. I am looking for a similar solution for my MIK rack that came with my R&M supercharger. I went to the CUBE website, and they sell the rack rails as accessory, and I am tempted to buy it and adapt it to my Supercharger MIK rack. But I am not sure if it will fit. My question: Did you ever consider that for your R&M knowing you also have the Cube bike? I am attaching a picture of the rack for your Cube. Can I also ask you a favor? Can you please measure the distances between the 4 holes of the rack attachment in your CUBE? In this way I can see if it will directly fit my rack or need any modification. Great thanks for your tips in advance.

1573227779936.png