New E-Bike for aussie to commute to work around 60km round trip

#1
Hi all,
I've been looking at the option of getting an e-bike to ride to work. I currently have a carbon road bike which I can get up to speed fairly easily (around 30kph) but as my commute would be on bike track and rougher road it's not all that comfortable. Plus the idea of having to wear bike gear/shorts and getting to work sweaty isn't appealing. So i'm thinking an e-bike would be good. I could wear jeans and a tee, have a softer ride and also carry extra gear on the rack.

The commute to work is about 30km (around 19miles) so 60km two way. I can cut it shorter by around 3km by taking a different route but I haven't scoped it out to see if it's any safer.
What I'm worried about is range and speed. I know where I am there is a restriction of 25kph (15mph) (quite a joke really when there are other maniacs on non e-bikes doing 50-60kph!), but I think it's not really enforced. Most of my commute has hardly any other riders so I think it would be safe to get it going a little faster then take it slower in the city.

What are some e-bikes that would suit my needs? I would need to get it derestricted so i'm looking for a motor that could handle it. I was thinking the bosch performance line.

Would love a belt drive and internal hub. What bikes have an internal hub + belt drive + bosch motor that would allow 45kph (28mph) or more?
Or should I go with something else?

Nothing astronomically expensive either.

Thanks for any advice.
 

michal

New Member
#2
Have you taken a look at Riese & Muller?

From what I've seen during my own research, most of their e-bikes feature Bosch Performance Line CX (20mph) or Performance Line Speed (28mph) motors, and can be configured with belt drives + internal hubs. Some can also be fitted with dual batteries.

You'll be paying for all that, though, as they're premium bikes that are built to order in Germany. Here in the US, I've seen prices range from $4,000 – $10,000 depending on the model and configuration.
 
#3
Have you taken a look at Riese & Muller?

From what I've seen during my own research, most of their e-bikes feature Bosch Performance Line CX (20mph) or Performance Line Speed (28mph) motors, and can be configured with belt drives + internal hubs. Some can also be fitted with dual batteries.

You'll be paying for all that, though, as they're premium bikes that are built to order in Germany. Here in the US, I've seen prices range from $4,000 – $10,000 depending on the model and configuration.
Yeah I have seen the supercharger but over here they charge 2x as much as any other bike. Not sure it's worth it.
 
#5
Yeah I have. A lbs has the ccs not sure about the ccx will have to ask. They seem good value, but I rather like the bosch gear and the cobi display.
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
#6

David Berry

Well-Known Member
#7
Rogue X ...
I suggest staying with the big brands and going to a store which has a corporate link to the brand (Orbea's included below for OMG interest). Support in time of need - when your ebike's sick and the shop that sold it to you no longer exists - is critical.

There is a wide range of ebikes between AU$3000 and AU$5000.

Here are a few suggestions - not recommendations, just interesting and easily located ebikes - to start the search:
Note for US forum members:
  • AU$1 = US$0.72. (For example AU$5000 x 0.72 = US$3600.)
  • All AU prices include 10% GST (goods & services tax).
... David
 
Last edited:
#8
Thanks, I like the look of the scott and the Super Commuter+ 7, do you think they will have enough battery to do at least 50-70km on a single charge if I use moderate power assist? I'm liking the juiced ccx more and more now. Not as sleek looking as the trek/scott/giant but big battery, fast and has a throttle which would help get the bike moving from a standstill nicely.
 

David Berry

Well-Known Member
#9
I like the look of the Scott and the Super Commuter+ 7, do you think they will have enough battery to do at least 50-70km on a single charge if I use moderate power assist?
Rogue X ...
The Scott and Trek ebikes that you are interested in use Bosch CX motors with 500 Wh (36 V) batteries - the same as my Trek Powerfly 5.

As an example, yesterday I rode into the city along a commuting route (mainly alongside the motorway) and returned on urban roads (suburban and arterial). I'm in no rush to repeat that ride and did not expect to quote it on the EBR Forum! There was a blustery westerly blowing (averaging 30 km/h, gusting to 50 km/h) making the first wind-assisted half relatively easy (Eco, Tour, Sport, Ultra) and return far tougher (Eco, Tour, Sport, Ultra). There were some hills. Outcome: 68 km with 3 km 'left' in the battery.

Last week I had two longer rides (76 and 80 km) and returned from each with >10 km left.

Typically, I watch the ebike's display (basic Bosch Purion) on the outward trip. As the distance ridden increases (10... 20... 30... 40...), I note the remaining range drop (70... 60... 50... 40...). Typically, I'll be using Tour but will occasionally check range in higher assist levels - it's good to know that I can have an easier return.

To answer your question: Yes, you'll manage 50 to 70 km on a single charge, but sometimes you'll need to be wary. Other forum members will likely tell you about avoiding too high or too low a charge level in your battery; I think you will need to start out at 100% and can expect to return with 10-20% charge remaining.
... David
 
Last edited:

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
#10
Unless you get an extra charger and recharge at work. Then you can boost the assist, the speed and meet your goal of arriving at work less sweaty.

Ask your fellow countryman, @David Berry what bike he has on order. High priced to be sure, but head and shoulders the best bike to meet your specs as stated. I ride the same with the high speed 28mph Bosch. Every time I ride it (every day unless it's rainy), I'm happy I spent the extra $$.

By the way, the full suspension not only adds substantialy to comfort but more importantly to safety, braking and overall stability.

20181119_143716.jpg
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
#11
Rogue X ...
I suggest staying with the big brands and going to a store which has a corporate link to the brand (Orbea's included below for OMG interest). Support in time of need - when your ebike's sick and the shop that sold it to you no longer exists - is critical.

There is a wide range of ebikes between AU$3000 and AU$5000.

Here are a few suggestions - not recommendations, just interesting and easily located ebikes - to start the search:
Note for US forum members:
  • AU$1 = US$0.72. (For example AU$5000 x 0.72 = US$3600.)
  • All AU prices include 10% GST (goods & services tax).
... David
These are all great options!
 
#12
Hello

If that's your situation, I got a good recommendation for commuting. I would buy a light e-bike for convenience, rather than a bulky bike with the strongest motor. I would recommend checking out a bike it's one I found on Indiegogo that's manufacturing a carbon framed bike like yours, with a 250W bafang motor, a belt drive option, it goes 32km/h, they have three models to choose, it has Schwalbe tires good for rough terrain and it's apparently weighs only 12.9kg. There are many options to choose from like this, but I'd thought I'd show this one, which looks like the most promising one.

You can see more on their page on Indiegogo

For the sake of convenience, I would check it out because it folds and it's apparently only 12.9kg. I've ordered one and and their bike looks promising so I hope they deliver, which they will in March of 2019. Looks great and seems like it has good functionality. btw their campaign is ending soon.
 
Last edited:

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
#14
FYI - Just to help you manage your expectations; I went for a 43 mile ride today keeping the assist level at "SPORT" or third out of four assist levels in Bosch talk.

I pushed fairly hard, keeping my heart rate at an average of 90 (I'm taking a beta blocker which slows the heart). . The terrain rose and fell a total of 1,200 feet or 400 meters. It took me 2:30 to complete the ride for an average speed of 17.2 with an average cadence of 65.

There were some long stretches at 24-26 mph however there was a brisk wind which slowed me down on some legs, Also, starts and stops have a big impact on average speed. It's important to know that even with a bike rated at 28 mph assist that 25 is more or less the maximum sustainable speed on level ground with no headwind. Keep all this in mind when you plan out your commutes. Your likely younger than I and in better shape so you might be able to push another 1-3 mph average, but doing so will likely get you to work all sweaty, even on an ebike. I used one battery down to 15% and the second one down to 45% so it took around 750 watts from batteries to complete this ride.

Here is a summary from Bosch's ebike connect portal. Data has been uploaded by the Nyon display unit. The graph below the map shows speed in Blue and my output power/wattage in Yellow. You can also graph altitude, heart-rate and cadence. You can drag the blue line down the middle of the graph right and left and the circle with the bike in it on the map moves along the route!

1124ride.jpg
 
#15
Hi- I have just purchased a 2019 Giant Quick E+. I am in NZ and it assists up to 45km/h. My commute is 63km, which I can do with about 10% battery left. To do this I need to stay in eco (100% assist) to normal (200% assist) modes (200% for the up hills) and turn the assist off for down hills. I average about 29-30km/h. Its early days for me on this bike but it seems to be OK. I am not a huge cyclist, but I have ridden my roadie to work on the same commute before.
 

Attachments

Johnny

Active Member
#17
Thanks, I like the look of the scott and the Super Commuter+ 7, do you think they will have enough battery to do at least 50-70km on a single charge if I use moderate power assist? I'm liking the juiced ccx more and more now. Not as sleek looking as the trek/scott/giant but big battery, fast and has a throttle which would help get the bike moving from a standstill nicely.
Bosch has a bike range calculator tool, you should play with it, it is fairly accurate.

However if you are commuting and want to keep your speed 20mph+ then 70km is close to the limit. I use only Eco mode but I ride fast and at 20+mph and my range is around 40miles with 400wh with 500 you will get around 50 I guess but it will be a workout.

The real problem is if you constantly fully charge and deplete it deeply then you will not have many cycles out of it.

For commuting that many miles everyday you may wanna go for the hub motor ones.
 
#18
Bosch has a bike range calculator tool, you should play with it, it is fairly accurate.

However if you are commuting and want to keep your speed 20mph+ then 70km is close to the limit. I use only Eco mode but I ride fast and at 20+mph and my range is around 40miles with 400wh with 500 you will get around 50 I guess but it will be a workout.

The real problem is if you constantly fully charge and deplete it deeply then you will not have many cycles out of it.

For commuting that many miles everyday you may wanna go for the hub motor ones.
Watched one of Court's Riese & Muller reviews recently and was fascinated that their dual battery bikes use both batteries concurrently so as not to deplete one faster than the other + both batteries charge when the bike is plugged in.
 
#19
Bosch has a bike range calculator tool, you should play with it, it is fairly accurate.

However if you are commuting and want to keep your speed 20mph+ then 70km is close to the limit. I use only Eco mode but I ride fast and at 20+mph and my range is around 40miles with 400wh with 500 you will get around 50 I guess but it will be a workout.

The real problem is if you constantly fully charge and deplete it deeply then you will not have many cycles out of it.

For commuting that many miles everyday you may wanna go for the hub motor ones.
Thanks, are hub motors better suited for my needs? I thought the mid-drives might be better.

Was looking at the giant quick-e. Seems like a nice and good priced bike.
I was also looking at perhaps a diy option of getting a bike and then putting on the bafang motor and battery. Slightly cheaper but sacrificing the nice integrated look that some of new e-bike have like the giant.

Still considering my options, but thanks for the replies!
 

PDoz

Active Member
#20
Hi- I have just purchased a 2019 Giant Quick E+. I am in NZ and it assists up to 45km/h. My commute is 63km, which I can do with about 10% battery left. To do this I need to stay in eco (100% assist) to normal (200% assist) modes (200% for the up hills) and turn the assist off for down hills. I average about 29-30km/h. Its early days for me on this bike but it seems to be OK. I am not a huge cyclist, but I have ridden my roadie to work on the same commute before.
Try playing with the giant app to reduce assist in eco - I have my full epro down to 50 % assist in eco, 125 in normal, then 250/300/360 . Even with the rear shocks sucking power on sandy trails I'm getting 10-15 km / 10% battery.

For the original question - be carefull in Australia with going throttle assist - our laws require even sillier speed restrictions for throttle assisted bikes