New Faraday Cortland

Prof_Stack

New Member
I noticed yesterday that Kickstarter has a new Faraday model announced, the Cortland, a step-through model with increased battery capacity and, I think, hydraulic disc brakes. Pretty good looking design, and I'm
thinking about it now. It's scheduled to be available in July of this year.

Faraday Cortland.jpg

The lower-priced S model now has a derailleur rather than 5-speed drum shifter. That probably saves weight, and cost, which might be passed on to the consumer. We'll see about that...

Faraday Cortland S.jpg

One of the kickers, so to speak, is the auxiliary battery pack that doubles the range. It's due in the fall.

Faraday Auxiliary Battery Pack.jpg
 
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JoePah

Well-Known Member
Court you know this business... What do you think their business model is?

Bikes that cost the same as the Faraday have a lot more features and capabilities, and bikes with the same capabilities cost a lot less.

The eBike business is a very challenging one, so if the company can stay in business more power to them!
 

Prof_Stack

New Member
Hey, it's a COOL looking bike. What more do you want? ;)

I just paid $2k for an early-bird Kickstarter option, saving $800 or so. I ordered the Cortland S, with the steel fenders (I don't like the bamboo style), and 8-speed derailleur. The derailleur saves a couple of pounds over the 5-speed hub in the Porteur. There were 8 of this option left when I ordered. The regular Cortland "Classic" $800 savings early-bird option was sold out.

I will use the Cortland for good weather commuting (I have a 2011 Ohm Urban Sport 750 for nasty weather) and Sunday joy rides in the sun. Or something like that.
 

Cameron Newland

Well-Known Member
Court you know this business... What do you think their business model is?

Bikes that cost the same as the Faraday have a lot more features and capabilities, and bikes with the same capabilities cost a lot less.

The eBike business is a very challenging one, so if the company can stay in business more power to them!
Faraday's business appears to be doing fine. They sell bikes to people who aren't particularly concerned about cost. Obviously, they'll sell better in Portland, Seattle and San Francisco than they will in Tallahassee and St. Louis, but every e-bike has its market and its geographic/demographic strengths and weaknesses.

I rode the Porteur and Porteur S around SF for a week and they were phenomenal bikes. Their range actually wasn't half-bad even with the small battery because the assist tops out at 20mph and the bike isn't sluggish at all when in the no-assist mode, so I found myself using the no-assist mode more often on the Porteur than with other ebikes, and my range was longer as a result. The user experience and product design on the Porteur are both superb. The Porteur is probably the most high-end electric city bike you can buy in the US today.
 
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Prof_Stack

New Member
Well, the Kickstarter campaign went over the top in a few days. All the $800 off retail Cortland and Cortland S models are claimed. I also added the auxiliary battery pack to the pledge, so now my Cortland S will have almost 600wH of available juice, evenly used by the BMS. That's probably more than I'll need for a long ride, but enough to eliminate range anxiety.
 

TrevorB

Active Member
At first glance this doesn't seem like much of ebike but after watching video see quality components and elegant design I realize what a great bike it is.

In regards to smartphone app, a better option would be smartwatch app, that way rider just needs to glance at their watch instead of digging out a phone.
 

Prof_Stack

New Member
On Kickstarter, Faraday announced that the Cortland will be delayed until early September. The delay is mainly due to frame issues, caused by improper welding and/or construction. Plus, or minus, the auxiliary battery is delayed until 2017. Looks like the Ohm Urban will continue to be my daily rider for longer than expected.
 

JoePah

Well-Known Member
Like to see a side by side comparison of the Stromer Thin (sales over 2,000 units) vs the Faraday Cortland.

Both are about the same weight, Thin has a larger battery and motor, and Aluminum frame. Single speed vs multi speed.
 

Prof_Stack

New Member
Like to see a side by side comparison of the Stromer Thin (sales over 2,000 units) vs the Faraday Cortland.

Both are about the same weight, Thin has a larger battery and motor, and Aluminum frame. Single speed vs multi speed.
Do you mean the Sonders Thin?
 

maqsews

New Member
So, has anyone received a Cortland S (or regular Cortland) yet? I know a couple of stores in my 3-state area just received a shipment, but I'd need to drive a few hundred miles to see a size small, and about 500 miles to see a size medium (which is what I need). Is it worth the drive? I was not wild about the Porteur due to the semi-bent-over ride position, stiff/bumpy ride (tires may have been over-inflated) and what seemed to me like too much boost even at the lower ("assist") level. I also did not like the 5 gears on the one I tried (Cortland should be better with the 8 gears). From talking to the sales folks at Faraday, I understand the mobile app due out Q1 of 2017 will let me set the max speed, max power and power multiplier to lower levels to fit my desire for more of a work out (when I want it) and reset it to higher levels, as desired. I want a step-through and I will eventually want the extra battery (which I believe will ship some time next year??), but I would like to have a plan in mind as to whether I should wait for this or buy something else. If it does not fit, feel comfortable, I will move on now.
 

Prof_Stack

New Member
Okay, I picked up the Cortland S today after work and brought it home in the light rain, dry in the back of the car. The fit and finish look good. The fenders look crisp and properly aligned. The rain stopped enough for me to ride it a little, getting the seat height adjusted upward.

The bike doesn't need e-power on level ground, and the low speed boost might be sufficient for all but the steeper hills. Tomorrow should provide time to ride it more, and I'll report on my findings and feelings.

There will be no honeymoon stage with this bike, as I'm still bummed it wasn't ready in July for great summer days of riding.

Having said that, it appears to be a well-built bicycle.
 

maqsews

New Member
Anxious to hear. The 3 Faraday Porteurs I have ridden at nearby dealers all had"issues" as noted in my first post. That is making me wonder about reliability. If these test vehicles are having problems, what happens when it's ridden every day. As noted, I need to drive a very long way to actually try a Cortland in size Medium (largest size available). I have tested several e-bikes and didn't like some thing about each one (Trek Lift Plus, Townie Go, Pedego City Commuter and Interceptor). I know nothing is perfect, but for $3000 plus dollars, I expect something pretty darn good. I was hoping Cortland might be the one.
 

Prof_Stack

New Member
Anxious to hear. The 3 Faraday Porteurs I have ridden at nearby dealers all had"issues" as noted in my first post. That is making me wonder about reliability. If these test vehicles are having problems, what happens when it's ridden every day. As noted, I need to drive a very long way to actually try a Cortland in size Medium (largest size available). I have tested several e-bikes and didn't like some thing about each one (Trek Lift Plus, Townie Go, Pedego City Commuter and Interceptor). I know nothing is perfect, but for $3000 plus dollars, I expect something pretty darn good. I was hoping Cortland might be the one.
Again, I have no emotional attachment to this new e-bike as it sits in the garage waiting for a ride today. I'll write something about it later today.

I'm sure this new Cortland will be reliable. The accessories ordered with the bike, like the rack, have not yet arrived. The dealer didn't know about the extras that people could order with it via the Kickstarter campaign. Until the rack comes, I'll continue commuting on the battlewagon Ohm Urban I've had since 2012.
 

Prof_Stack

New Member
I took the new Cortland S out for its maiden voyage, and things went very well.

The 10 mile or so loop starts on top of a hill and ends there, so the hill-climbing got tested at the end. For a non-suspension frame, the ride was relatively smooth.

The first power level is more than enough for level ground or slight uphill riding. There is some noise from the motor, but not that much. I'm used to the total silence of the Bionx motor.

I picked a VERY steep street to ride up, with full power boost and lowest gearing. That went fine, as long as I leaned forward a little to allow the front motor to have full traction. The rack will add more weight there.

The only possible glitch was that twice during the ride, after going over some rough pavement, the power switch moved to the off position. Or maybe my thumb accidentally hit it.

The light weight of the bike makes it a snap to carry inside, compared to the 60# or so of the Ohm Urban.

After the 10 miles, about 60% of the battery level was left, about what Faraday advertises. The newer batteries have around 300wH of juice.

So far, so good. I like it.

Cortland S #01.jpg

It certainly is a very handsome looking bicycle.
Cortland S #02.jpg

I put a Hotshot Micro rear light on the post stem just under the seat. That really shows up, as seen here:
Cortland S #04.jpg
 

IndyFab

New Member
Just picked up our Cortland S from our LBS.
Initial ride was like butter, but then the motor stopped working. headlight was still on so it seemed like it had power, but the hub would not work.
Thought it might be low charge, so we charged it overnight, but the motor will not start up. Lights both front and back power on.

We are new to Faraday, and loved the bike for the 5 miles uphill it worked, but now we are concerned of possible quality issues. Still waiting to hear back from the company and the bike store.

Anyone here have any suggestions on possibly an easy solution? I've checked all the cabling, and turned on/off, clicked controls to every possible combination to no avail.
I don't want to do anything more invasive for fear of making things worse and giving either the LBS or Faraday a scapegoat!

thanks in advance!
 

Ann M.

Well-Known Member
Also, follow that wiring all the way up to the controller. If one of the 3 pole wires came loose, bike doesn't go! And check that your motor inhibitors on the brake levers aren't engaged; that will stop the bike also. Faraday make beautiful bikes and is a reputable small company, so this should get worked out fast.
 

IndyFab

New Member
the LBS is apparently in touch with Faraday and will request parts to address the problem. Not clear what the problem was, but I'll keep the forum updated. I suspect it was in the handlebar controller, but i'll let ya'll know. thanks.