New Signs Posted On Some Pennsylvania Trails

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
I'm seeing new signs posted at trailheads in parts of Pennsylvania. The old "No Motor Vehicles" signs are being replaced with ones that say "No Unauthorized Motor Vehicles".

IMG_0671a.jpg

The print is too fine to read in the picture but the sign to the left reads:

To Accommodate Mobility impaired Persons

1 - Wheelchairs and similar devices built specifically for mobility disabilities are allowed.

2 - Other power driven mobility devices not specifically designed for mobility disabilities
may be used by individuals provided:

a - Motors on devices are 750 watts or less
b - Devices weigh less than 100 pounds
c - Devices are no more than 36" wide
d - Devices have fully operating pedals

3 - No internal combustion devices


This pretty much follows Pennsylvania's e-bike policy but I find it encouraging to see it posted at trailheads.
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
Wahoo! This makes my Stromer legal (class 3)
Unfortunately not in PA. We have a max assisted speed of 20 mph. Motor must stop assisting at 20. The state and many local governments are doing really well, some areas are dragging their heels, but we're getting there. Maybe one day we'll get to speed pedelecs.

@6zfshdb thanks for posting this. Brightened my day:)
 
Unfortunately not in PA. We have a max assisted speed of 20 mph. Motor must stop assisting at 20. The state and many local governments are doing really well, some areas are dragging their heels, but we're getting there. Maybe one day we'll get to speed pedelecs.
I don't know the law in PA, and I'm not arguing that, but I don't understand why it matters how fast your bike can go. It seems like what matters is how fast you ride it. Interesting that the sign doesn't say anything about speed.

There are cars on the streets, forget about Interstate Highways, that can go 160 mph or maybe even 220 mph. As long as they don't actually exceed the speed limit no one suggests they shouldn't be allowed on the streets. Beyond that, there are plenty of people who can pedal an analog bike at 30+ mph without gravity or a tailwind assist. Should they be banned because of their Class 3 muscles?

TT
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
I don't know the law in PA, and I'm not arguing that, but I don't understand why it matters how fast your bike can go. It seems like what matters is how fast you ride it. Interesting that the sign doesn't say anything about speed.

There are cars on the streets, forget about Interstate Highways, that can go 160 mph or maybe even 220 mph. As long as they don't actually exceed the speed limit no one suggests they shouldn't be allowed on the streets. Beyond that, there are plenty of people who can pedal an analog bike at 30+ mph without gravity or a tailwind assist. Should they be banned because of their Class 3 muscles?

TT
The sign doesn't include a lot of the requirements in the state law. It would be a very large sign if it did. You're shooting the messenger. I'm not defending the law, just stating what it is. Since April we've been actively fighting local regulators here to keep/get access to local trails for ebikes. I'm doing my bit, fighting our fight. If you don't like the laws here, please join us.
 

opimax

Well-Known Member
With my out of state plates I park and ride, hard to argue with the sign. I would hope I could at least play ignorance and be sent home without any other problems of tickets or having my bike confiscated :). Maybe this implies less hassles or scrutiny, my bike looks like a class 1,2 or 3 to me
 

Ken M

Well-Known Member
Unfortunately not in PA. We have a max assisted speed of 20 mph. Motor must stop assisting at 20. The state and many local governments are doing really well, some areas are dragging their heels, but we're getting there. Maybe one day we'll get to speed pedelecs.

@6zfshdb thanks for posting this. Brightened my day:)
My understanding is that states can only have regulations on usage of ebikes and not redefining what is a compliant ebike. There is a federal ebike definition that maybe the lawmakers in PA need to read and then consider how to apply usage regulations around that. Otherwise just saying assist must cut off at 20mph is just going to steam roll right over the policy if/when it ever gets challenged in court.
 

Ken M

Well-Known Member
I don't know the law in PA, and I'm not arguing that, but I don't understand why it matters how fast your bike can go. It seems like what matters is how fast you ride it. Interesting that the sign doesn't say anything about speed.

There are cars on the streets, forget about Interstate Highways, that can go 160 mph or maybe even 220 mph. As long as they don't actually exceed the speed limit no one suggests they shouldn't be allowed on the streets. Beyond that, there are plenty of people who can pedal an analog bike at 30+ mph without gravity or a tailwind assist. Should they be banned because of their Class 3 muscles?

TT

Great point but I don't think many lawmakers even realize what some traditional bike riders are capable of. In reality what ebikes have provided is a way for most riders to just average a faster safe speed that is still well below what a human on a traditional bike can achieve at least for a short distance.

Note: The 1 hour record has a rider averaging over 30 mph so those that claim it's not possible are not informed. A 20mph assist limit on ebikes is just not rational unless you are Bosch, Yamaha, Brose, or other mid drive manufacturer wanting to make the low powered EU ebikes the global standard.