New Yamaha Gravel Bike

JRA

Well-Known Member
#41
I have observed that over 90% of the bicycle commuters in Portland, OR use drop bar bikes.

Other than that it is just a matter of personal preference and shouldn’t be based on peer pressure.
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
#44
If you're riding on gravel, I think you should have suspension.
The Yamaha gravel bike is essentially a road bike with different tire.

I think this one is better: https://ninerbikes.com/pages/the-mc...UKwTorrrr6FfSWBFWqhWf9eWwBpKIXhwfT7ViQw-b4kZo
Gravel riders need to precise handling and agility. Gravel bikes have endurance geometry compared to road bikes that have aero geometry.
For an untrained eye, both look the same but for a rider, they are different.

https://ninerbikes.com/pages/gravel-bikes

Niner doesn't make any gravel bikes with suspension, they just spec 700x50c tires.
 
#46
If you're riding on gravel, I think you should have suspension.
The Yamaha gravel bike is essentially a road bike with different tire.

I think this one is better: https://ninerbikes.com/pages/the-mc...UKwTorrrr6FfSWBFWqhWf9eWwBpKIXhwfT7ViQw-b4kZo
I guess it depends on what kind of gravel roads you ride. If fairly smooth, suspension is unnecessary and wider tires with lower pressure work well. Gravel bikes with suspension seem to be crossing the line with mountain bikes too much. On gravel rides I do, there is significant pavement riding as well, and I'd rather have a gravel bike that is more like a road bike, just with wider tires. That works well on roads with bad pavement as well. Suspension adds weight and complexity to a bike.
 

JRA

Well-Known Member
#47
Having ridden thousands of miles on gravel/pavé on a rigid drop bar bike I have seen no need for any suspension other than running the lowish psi afforded by using wide rims and tires, i25/40-45c @ 35psi tubeless.

But what works for me doesn’t mean it will work for everybody and it is good that there are options available to meet just about anyone’s needs.