Orbea Gain for commuting?

Jaxx

Well-Known Member
At least it's a helmet of some description. Over here many roadies (not MTB's) only wear them when racing. Duh.
 
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I know. These accessories really add up, especially for me as a beginner. It doesn't help that I really dig the sports aspect of cycling and would always rather get the racing versions of anything if i had a choice. I must have spent hundreds already....
 

Jaxx

Well-Known Member
I know. These accessories really add up, especially for me as a beginner. It doesn't help that I really dig the sports aspect of cycling and would always rather get the racing versions of anything if i had a choice. I must have spent hundreds already....[/QUOT

With the benefit of riding since 1965, I can assure you, it's only the start for splashing the cash. There's always a new shiny, lighter, faster accessory or item of clothing been released, that captures our imagination.
 

Frasee

New Member
I just bought the orbea gain flat bar bicycle with integrated rack & lights.

A few points to consider.

This is new & evolving technology so its good without being perfect.

The idea of the gain is to provide some assistance via the electric motor, however that assistance is to some extent reduced by the added weight of the battery & motor. Moreover, i was advised its not wise to put narrow tyres on it due to the weight & motor being in the back hub. So rolling resistance is moderate.

Overall, this bicycle is perfect for commuting if you have any of these issues:

Your commute is a long distance & you dont want to get exhausted arriving for work.

There are decent hills on your commute & this bike will take the sting out of the inclines.

After years of cycling i find hills can bash up my legs. In part thats due to multiple tendon injuries. This bike means Im not in pain. Similarily, if its windy its great.

A few points to note the gain has a new push button system to change gears on the handle bars. The integrated light system is brilliant. Its a must if you ride in the dark as cycling lights which need to be recharged are utterly painful. A few niggles The brooks saddle is ruddy uncomfortable & will take a long time to wear in. The handle bar grips are very firm so i changed them.

Overall this bicycle is perfect for me who is basically using this to replace my car when doing 20 kms a day visiting friends, going to the pool or visting my mum. All these trips are less than 7 kms.

If you dont want to do any work then this bicycle is not suitable.

In the future, the benefits of this technology will grow if battery weight could continue to fall.

So if you want to use your car less whilst getting moderate cruisy exercise this bike is highly recommended.
 

Jaxx

Well-Known Member
I just bought the orbea gain flat bar bicycle with integrated rack & lights.

A few points to consider.

This is new & evolving technology so its good without being perfect.

The idea of the gain is to provide some assistance via the electric motor, however that assistance is to some extent reduced by the added weight of the battery & motor. Moreover, i was advised its not wise to put narrow tyres on it due to the weight & motor being in the back hub. So rolling resistance is moderate.

Overall, this bicycle is perfect for commuting if you have any of these issues:

Your commute is a long distance & you dont want to get exhausted arriving for work.

There are decent hills on your commute & this bike will take the sting out of the inclines.

After years of cycling i find hills can bash up my legs. In part thats due to multiple tendon injuries. This bike means Im not in pain. Similarily, if its windy its great.

A few points to note the gain has a new push button system to change gears on the handle bars. The integrated light system is brilliant. Its a must if you ride in the dark as cycling lights which need to be recharged are utterly painful. A few niggles The brooks saddle is ruddy uncomfortable & will take a long time to wear in. The handle bar grips are very firm so i changed them.

Overall this bicycle is perfect for me who is basically using this to replace my car when doing 20 kms a day visiting friends, going to the pool or visting my mum. All these trips are less than 7 kms.

If you dont want to do any work then this bicycle is not suitable.

In the future, the benefits of this technology will grow if battery weight could continue to fall.

So if you want to use your car less whilst getting moderate cruisy exercise this bike is highly recommended.
Good to hear your choice of bike suits you. The Brooks, won't take long to break in? It always appears that way, soon you won't notice it. That's the "Brooks Way" Enjoy.
 

Solom01

Active Member
So a question for other Gain owners. Did lowering the maximum power output in the different levels make any difference in range? I know this sounds like a really dumb question since common sense would tell you that it should, but based on the way hub motors work and their efficiency I'm not really sure. At one point I lowered level one from 100 to 70% (since I rarely use level 2 or 3 I figured this would e the easiest test) and didn't really see much of a difference in battery use although I certainly felt a difference in the amount of assistance - has anyone here tried it for long enough to have a more sound answer? Thanks in advance.
 

Jaxx

Well-Known Member
Sol, yeah I've persisted with the trial. Actually ended up putting eco mode back to 100% like you I found little difference in usage. Also as you do, I hardly touch the other assist modes. When I do? It's because I need help, so they are staying at max setting.
 

Solom01

Active Member
Sol, yeah I've persisted with the trial. Actually ended up putting eco mode back to 100% like you I found little difference in usage. Also as you do, I hardly touch the other assist modes. When I do? It's because I need help, so they are staying at max setting.
Thanks Jaxx. I think I'll leave mine at 100% too.
 

Frasee

New Member
So a question for other Gain owners. Did lowering the maximum power output in the different levels make any difference in range? I know this sounds like a really dumb question since common sense would tell you that it should, but based on the way hub motors work and their efficiency I'm not really sure. At one point I lowered level one from 100 to 70% (since I rarely use level 2 or 3 I figured this would e the easiest test) and didn't really see much of a difference in battery use although I certainly felt a difference in the amount of assistance - has anyone here tried it for long enough to have a more sound answer? Thanks in advance.
No use asking me im inherently slack put the assistance up to full.
 

Frasee

New Member
4km isn't far, so the smaller battery of the Gain won't matter. It is really conceived of however as a bike for road enthusiasts who just want a little help uphill, and otherwise intend to be riding above 25kph under their own power. Not as a commuting platform. I like the stealth look and idea. For commuting, lights, rack and fenders are essential. You should be able to add these to the Gain. Running the lights off the main battery will probably not work. (So just use rechargeable detachable lights, or get a dynamo hub.) If you want to go on long road rides for fitness and/or fun (in addition to commuting) then this could be a nice choice. If you just want to accomplish your short commute, you can do that for less money with some other bike that will have more range and power, and include the essential lights, rack and fenders. Nothing will come