Over 50's 2017 XDuro Trekking 4.0 Chronicles

2017 Haibike Trekking 4.0 Size for a 5'8 1/2", 29.5" inseam, 50+ year old novice bike commuter?

  • L 56 CM

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Bike is no good for commuting in any size

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    3
  • Poll closed .

Over50

Well-Known Member
I find the Haibike Trekking to be a very stiff frame, but I have 38C tires. @Over50 could you compare the ride comfort between this bike and the R&M Charger? Which fares better in the Detroit potholes?
First I have to caveat that I have the suspension set pretty stiff on both bikes. Most folks might ride my bikes and say "why have suspension if you don't use it?" Well its stiff on both but I've been riding that way on the theory that running close to max tire pressure and with stiff suspension will increase my efficiency (thus optimizing battery range). For the comparison between the two: I have the BodyFloat set the same between the two bikes (actually three bikes with my human powered bike). The front forks are set with similar air pressure (about 90 lbs) but I haven't taken time to tune the rebound identically on the two bikes. For starters on the Haibike, I set the rebound right in the middle. The R&M, off the top of my head, I don't recall where I landed after experimentation. The forks are both Suntour but different models. On both, I'm using only between 1/3rd to 1/2 of available travel. So with that background, I'd say right now the Haibike is smoothing things out a bit better but it isn't dramatically different. I was under the impression that the longer wheel base of the R&M would provide overall better comfort but it doesn't necessarily feel that way now they way I have things tuned. I've been running the same or similar tire pressure on the two bikes (same tires). I'm not sure what difference rim size makes but the R&M I think has 40 mm rims and the Haibike 35. I thought it odd they would be different for the same tire and it seems it could give the tire a slightly different profile but it isn't really noticeable by looking at the two side by side. I'm not sure how this impacts the ride. I do feel like the Haibike is more maneuverable for avoiding holes and debris. I feel a bit more stable on higher speed turns with the R&M. Probably a long non-answer for you but those have been my impressions so far. I wouldn't say one bike is head and shoulders over the other in comfort.
 

JayVee

Well-Known Member
I envy your SuperMoto tyres. I wish I could have gotten a bike with something similar. I have 38Cs because it was the only Haibike option available if I wanted to get a 45km/h bike. With narrower tires the Trekking is really tiring to ride on countryside roads. I'm looking into getting a seat post dampening device, although I haven't decided which one. Something like a Thudbuster probably won't work as it requires an 11cm clearance between the frame and the saddle, which I don't have.
 

Over50

Well-Known Member
I envy your SuperMoto tyres....
On my R&M thread I posted that on a few occasions I've found small pieces of glass embedded between the treads of the Super Moto Xs but as of yet no flats. On Friday I commuted on the Haibike and on Saturday's inspection of the bike I found a wire embedded in the rear tire between the treads. It was solidly embedded so I felt sure that as soon as I pulled it out I would have a leak. Since the tire hadn't lost any pressure I grabbed a spare tube and rode it over to the bike shop. I'm right at 500 miles so I also wanted them to inspect the chain, brakes etc. Anyway, we pulled the wire out with needle nose pliers. It was very sharp and thin and about 1/2 of an inch long about half of which was stuck in the tire. So it penetrated about 1/4 of an inch but didn't penetrate the tube. It appeared to bend as it went into the tire. Not sure if it just wasn't long enough or if the protective layer of the tire stopped the wire and bent it sideways. So far so good with these tires.
 

Sweetwater

Active Member
I'll just throw this out there as an option since you have a Trek dealer: I posted a couple of times here that I would have considered the new 2018 Trek Powerfly 5 hardtail over the Haibike had I known it was coming out. It has the CX motor but Trek has done an even better job at integrating that battery. It has the Purion display vs the Intuvia. It is listed about $1,000 less vs the Haibike but it does not come set up as a commuter. But you can add a rack, fenders and lighting per their website. Once you add those items, particularly the lighting, you probably have an equivalent price tag. But with Trek and Bontrager I think you might find better access to accessories and to service. I had already ordered the Haibike when I learned of the Trek. I just mentioned it to my dealer as a 'what if' and they seemed to think the add-ons were not a big deal and concurred that the bike could be turned into a good all-around/commuter. I'd probably also change the tires if the commute is strictly street riding. I guess much depends on the e-bike prowess of your local Trek dealer (my local store is pretty good and has been getting some of its techs certified with Bosch). Perhaps also with Trek you might be able to find a bike to demo.

https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/bikes/mountain-bikes/electric-mountain-bikes/powerfly/powerfly-5/p/2914600-2018/
It's a good looking bike on the surface and I really like the Bosch system (would love the 500W/h over my 2016 400 W/h) so I dug a little deeper.
Trek has been in my pedal bike stable routinely the past 40 years so the frame is solid.
However, the components used on this bike amounted to a major disappointment.
That's a similar price range to my FullSeven S Pro and it has better brakes, shocks (dual) and much better drive components.
I seriously question using entry level components on a 75nM drive, just looking for component failure sooner than later.
 

japalmer4

New Member
I just got my new Trekking 4.0 and noticed the maximum weight on the rack is 15 kg. That sounds low. Anyone try to put more weight on the rear rack?
 

Over50

Well-Known Member
I just got my new Trekking 4.0 and noticed the maximum weight on the rack is 15 kg. That sounds low. Anyone try to put more weight on the rear rack?
I don't have panniers that fit the rack/bike so I haven't put much weight on it. I am limited to a velcro attached trunk bag. The weight limit is surprising because the rack and bike/mounts seem burly. I noticed the bike has extra mounting points so I think you could change the rack. Something I might consider if I decide to keep the bike longer term.
 

SamC

New Member
I'm in the Haibike forum and not the Riese and Muller forum? Yes, I ordered a Haibike as my backup commuter and alternative ride. I wanted to switch things up from time to time and have a backup bike for when the R&M needs work.

Several factors influenced my purchase decision in no particular order:
  • felt like a class 1 wouldn't slow my commute too much due to all the start/stop I have
  • wanted to stick with Bosch for availability of service and battery sharing
  • wanted a lower tech bike as the backup (no IGH and not a belt drive) for better availability of mechanics that can fix things
  • most important: wanted to buy locally this time since I am not a good mechanic and am dependent on local shops for service - for mid-tier to upper-tier Bosch bikes this means I only had access to Trek and Haibike (could buy Specialized Vado if I wanted a Brose bike)
  • Rode the Trek Super Commuter but don't like the red color and lack of suspension
  • Really like the motor and battery integration on the Trekking 4.0; how the CX motor is tilted up, also like the lighting on the 4.0
  • Pleased with the Super Moto-X tires on the R&M and same come on the Trekking 4.0; originally thought to go to a narrower tire but my roads really suck; and I've run over a lot of glass with my Moto-X tires and so far no flats
The biggest concern was sizing and there are some posts in this thread about that:
https://electricbikereview.com/forum/threads/are-haibikes-huge.13377/page-2
Trying the bike for sizing wasn't going to be an option unless I was willing to travel. I spent quite a bit of money doing this when I purchased the R&M and didn't really want to repeat with this purchase. So sizing was the biggest concern/risk with this purchase. I had several knowledgeable opinions steering me to the S 52cm and several to the XS 48cm frame (I'm 5'8" to 5'9" and 29.5" inseam - buy 30" inseam jeans). I ordered the XS as the opinions and feedback on this forum seemed to tick slightly in the favor of the XS. But the real clincher was the shop telling me they would put the bike into inventory if it wasn't the right size and order another for me. Great service from the shop which is primarily a Trek dealer but also sells IZip. They are a local outfit with a few locations and one of their locations has sold some Haibikes. My location has never stocked one so they had to do some research on order process etc. But they seem to think the bike will be one they can sell to another customer if it doesn't fit me. That really reduced my risk of purchase. I even offered to pay a restocking fee if necessary but they cited me being a good customer etc and said that wouldn't be necessary.

We also compared the Trekking 4.0 specs to some Treks and it seemed to fit more closely to the Powerfly 5 which they had in the shop. I took out a 17.5" Powerfly 5 (really fun bike by the way) and it seemed a good fit. Standover height on the Powerfly was listed the same as the Trekking 4.0 for instance. Geometries after that varied somewhat but fingers crossed that the 17.5" Powerfly was close enough of a proxy to the XS Trekking 4.0.

So when the bike comes in and if it fits I plan to make some mods (BodyFloat, maybe pedals, maybe handlebars, locking seat clamp maybe some security skewers), find some fitting panniers and/or trunk bag, and then break the bike in for some later summer commuting. I hope to have some feedback and comparisons to the R&M Charger to post here in the near future.
My XDuro Trekking 4.0 arrived and I test rode it today - XS 48 cm.

To recap: the LBS agreed to put the bike back in stock if it didn't fit and order a different size. I've already paid full purchase price. I had some very knowledgeable folks advise me to order the S (52 cm) and some equally knowledgeable folks advise me to order the XS. For example, a Haibike Marketing Manager was in the small camp and Ravi and the shop advertising to be the biggest Haibike seller (California) was in the XS camp. I set the bike side by side with my Riese and Muller Charger (M - 49 cm) and it does seem a bit smaller front to back but not noticeably so. The height seemed the same. I straddled the XS Haibike with shoes on and I touch the top tube. This is almost identical Stand-Over to the Charger although their specs say they are different by a cm or two. Judging solely on Stand-Over, I think the XS must be the right bike as I would have zero clearance on the next larger size.

Now considering reach: the bike felt good when I started riding. It is actually more upright vs the Charger and my arms were extended without being locked. It seemed fine but after about 30 minutes of riding I felt some pressure on my hands that I don't feel on the Charger. This seemed odd to be with a more upright position. I think the seat could be pushed back about 1/2 inch and the grips could be rotated. An LBS employee commented that the bike looked a bit short in terms of reach. So this is the odd thing about the Haibike vs the R&M. It has the scrunched up Top Tube and shorter wheelbase and everything seems closer together. I like the sporty feel of the bike and I even like the wider handle bars. They do help me starting from a stop because I have more leverage. I feel like the bike will be easier to take over curbs and sidewalks when necessary whereas the R&M is a better cruiser over long distance. I definitely wouldn't say I like it better than the R&M it is just different in ride and handling. The Haibike is sportier, perhaps lighter, and feels more agile. The R&M feels like it is more comfortable and would be particularly more comfortable over longer distance of on-road riding (it is worth mentioning that they have the same tires).

As for the 20mph CX motor: I definitely can't get the top speeds I get with the R&M but we're talking 19-20 mph vs 22-25 mph. I don't know though if it will really slow my commute. I did the test ride a lot in Sport mode and the torque is impressive. I feel like I just jump right up to 19 mph effortlessly. I'm sure it will cost me a bit of time on my commute but I don't think it will be much. It might save me some effort given the amount of start/stop on my commute and also have and advantage at those downtown intersections. I usually ride the R&M in Tour and Eco and focus more on range vs fast starting and top speed. The Haibike in Sport mode just jumps into action and then levels off between 19 and 20 mph. I didn't have much success maintaining a speed over 21 although I did top out at 21 on my test ride. The motor cutoff is extremely smooth and I don't necessarily feel it cutting out. I moreso just notice that I can't keep accelerating.

I think it is going to be a good 2nd commuter offering very different ride characteristics. My LBS guy left on vacation today so I didn't take delivery of the bike. Next steps are to order a BodyFloat and some pedals (opting for the same Origin8 Slimline 9s currently in use on my R&M). When my LBS guy is back I'll go back in for some additional fit confirmation before I agree to take this bike.

Just a note on the rear carrier: there was a thread here about panniers/bags for the rack. I ordered the 20 mm Ortleib hooks and took them to the LbS to check the size. They seemed way too large. Odd because folks seemed pretty certain the Standwell rack requires the 20 mm hooks. The rack is a bit wider vs the Racktime on the R&M thus the Vaude bag with the Racktime adaptor will not fit. Also, the lights are not daytime running and can be turned on/off. I thought they would be like the euro-lights on the R&M and 'always on'. But I'm glad for the potential daylight battery savings when I can use my USB rechargeable flashers. When/if I take delivery of this bike next week I will post some side by side comparison pictures to the R&M.

Hi Over50, I hate to resurrect this topic, but I too am struggling with the “right size” question. I’m 5-10 with a 31-inch inseam. I am 53 years old and want an ebike for use on paved bike paths and maybe some very light off-road. I am looking at the 2017 xduro cross 4.0, which appears to be identical to the xduro trekking 4.0 bike w/o the fenders, lights, etc. I started this process thinking the 56(M) would be the most appropriate frame size – because I have always been a medium. Fortunately, I spoke to some very knowledge folks who were well aware of Haibike’s useless size designations for this bike. The choice is now between the S and XS. It looks like you went with the XS 48. I read some feedback you provided shortly after you got the bike in July. I got the sense you thought it was a good fit, but you had some concern with the reach. Has your opinion of the size changed after six or seven months? Any suggestions for me on the size decision? I hate the idea of a bike that is too small. My one complaint with my old 1989 mountain bike is that my hands go numb on long rides. I assume that one explanation for that problem is that I’m riding a bike that is too small (18-inch frame) - but I suspect the real explanation may be more complicated. Alternatively, if I got the XS, I think my 5-5 wife could ride this bike in a pinch (until she gets her own.) I fear that if I got the S(52), that would not be an option – but maybe I’m wrong. Any insight you can provide on any of this would be greatly appreciated.
 

Over50

Well-Known Member
Hi Over50, I hate to resurrect this topic, but I too am struggling with the “right size” question. I’m 5-10 with a 31-inch inseam. I am 53 years old and want an ebike for use on paved bike paths and maybe some very light off-road. I am looking at the 2017 xduro cross 4.0, which appears to be identical to the xduro trekking 4.0 bike w/o the fenders, lights, etc. I started this process thinking the 56(M) would be the most appropriate frame size – because I have always been a medium. Fortunately, I spoke to some very knowledge folks who were well aware of Haibike’s useless size designations for this bike. The choice is now between the S and XS. It looks like you went with the XS 48. I read some feedback you provided shortly after you got the bike in July. I got the sense you thought it was a good fit, but you had some concern with the reach. Has your opinion of the size changed after six or seven months? Any suggestions for me on the size decision? I hate the idea of a bike that is too small. My one complaint with my old 1989 mountain bike is that my hands go numb on long rides. I assume that one explanation for that problem is that I’m riding a bike that is too small (18-inch frame) - but I suspect the real explanation may be more complicated. Alternatively, if I got the XS, I think my 5-5 wife could ride this bike in a pinch (until she gets her own.) I fear that if I got the S(52), that would not be an option – but maybe I’m wrong. Any insight you can provide on any of this would be greatly appreciated.
My honest feeling is that the bike feels small to me. I feel like I am on a BMX bike. It is a different feeling vs when I'm on the Riese and Muller which is a 49 (should be little difference between a 48 and 49 right?). Now saying it feels small doesn't mean it is necessarily bad. I am a bit more upright, I feel like I have a lot of control over the bike and it is very agile. I do my 35 mile commute with no discomfort in hands, neck or back. I would say it beats my larger bike in agility. I've thought maybe the feeling of being on a small bike is caused by the contrast. That is switching up between a larger and smaller bike frequently. I think the larger sized Trekking 4.0 model would have worked for me but I guess I'll not be able to say for sure until I've tried one (not possible in my area with no Haibike inventory available).
 

JayVee

Well-Known Member
I would add to pay close attention to the difference between the ‘classic’ Haibike frame and the newer Xduro 4.0 or Sduro 9.5 frame.

For example, I have the classic Trekking in size 52. It has a horizontal top tube of 600mm, which is the same as some L sized frames I’ve owned. Moreover, it comes with 3 spacers which place the handlebars quite high. The standover height of 790 mm makes it easy to straddle, so I took the 52 (size S) even though I’m slightly under 6ft1. No regrets.

But the newer frames have a top tube measurement of 580mm. So you have to look at the geometry very carefully. If I got the newer style frame, I’d probably go with size 56.
 

Over50

Well-Known Member
I would add to pay close attention to the difference between the ‘classic’ Haibike frame and the newer Xduro 4.0 or Sduro 9.5 frame.

For example, I have the classic Trekking in size 52. It has a horizontal top tube of 600mm, which is the same as some L sized frames I’ve owned. Moreover, it comes with 3 spacers which place the handlebars quite high. The standover height of 790 mm makes it easy to straddle, so I took the 52 (size S) even though I’m slightly under 6ft1. No regrets.

But the newer frames have a top tube measurement of 580mm. So you have to look at the geometry very carefully. If I got the newer style frame, I’d probably go with size 56.
This reminds me of a point I forgot to make in my response. While the bike feels small to me (48), the standover height is perfect. I can straddle flat footed and I'm barely clearing the top tube (I'm 5'8 1/2). I have about the same amount of clearance on the R&M (a 49). I see on Haibike's description they mention something about a revised geometry (of the XDuro 4.0 Trekking). So I imagine that foremost they are referring to that scrunched up top tube you mention.

And as an aside, I mentioned to the LBS that the bike felt small to me but that it might just be the contrast with the other bike: they just offered up a possible experiment of trying a slightly longer stem to stretch me out a bit more. Said I could try it for a few commutes and they would switch it back if I didn't like the change. Not sure if I'll try this or not since I'm not having any discomfort on the rides.
 

JayVee

Well-Known Member
Yes, some sort of adaptor like Sonoboy posted might be a way to go. I've got my eye on an Arkel velcro option. Didn't really want to go to velcro when I've got a rack designed for a secure mounting system but velcro might be the least problematic at this point. Bag gets pretty good reviews:

I ended up getting the XLC BA-S47 bag. It's not as sexy as the Arkel, but it comes with the adaptor plate included. The bag snaps onto the rack and allows an extra battery to be carried around. My 2nd Yamaha battery just fits, so I assume the shorter Bosch battery should fit with no problems.

The big advantage I can see with the Arkel is that you can probably use your panniers and a trunk bag at the same time. This isn't really possible with the system plate.

https://www.amazon.de/XLC-Gepäckträgertasche-BA-S47-anthrazit-Systemgepäckträger/dp/B00GLHZZVU
 

Over50

Well-Known Member
After a couple of cold March commutes I was almost at 1,000 miles. So took the XDuro Trekking 4.0 to the shop for a good going over (cleaning, chain replacement). I opted to replace the chain early and went with the KMC EPT 11 (I think that was it). E-Bike rated chain.
 

Manu

Active Member
¡eye! Kmc ept 10 speed and kmc ept 11 speed have the same pin 5mm,They also exist in 6mm and 8mm for less speeds
 
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Over50

Well-Known Member
¡eye! Kmc ept 10 speed and kmc ept 11 speed have the same pin 5mm,They also exist in 6mm and 8mm for less speeds
Your post showed up as something different in my email. Stating a difference between the 10 and 11 speed chain. The XDuro 4.0 is an 11 speed so I used the EPT 11. Hope that was the right choice.
 

Manu

Active Member
I was wrong to look at the specifications and naturally I corrected the post.I should not give you problems with so few miles but if you see that pine nuts would have to change the cassette or plate for new ones, the new chain will have to adapt to the wear generated by the previous one.


For me it is the best chain and it adapts to many cassette profiles from other manufacturers.With more miles tell us how it works.

http://kmcchain.us/chain/x11ept-eco-proteq/

http://www.kmcchain.es/chain-e_bike-multispeed-10_speed
http://www.kmcchain.es/chain-e_bike-multispeed-11_speed

here is more detailed the size of pin and they are the same except the number of links and the treatment,114/118/136 links


the longest is the X10 ept of 136 links.


Buy a quick link reusable or noreusable and breakchain for that chain and your problems will be zero.


I have the x10 silver series with haibike and with 1200 kilometers, it seems recently bought
 
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Over50

Well-Known Member
My first commute (37 miles) today since the tune-up and new KMC chain. 32F on departure at 5:30 a.m. and 55 on return at 2pm. The XDuro Trekking was buttery smooth. I tripped the 1,000 mile mark (about 8 months after purchase with 2 months no riding).

Odd thing I didn't notice when I picked up the bike at the LBS after the tune-up so I didn't ask them about it. The max speed on my Intuvia display was previously around 26 mph and I did that on the down slope of a freeway overpass. The max speed after the LBS worked on the bike was over 31 mph. I always encourage the techs at my LBS to take my bikes out and ride them anytime they do work for me so I don't mind that they ride them around. But I was just wondering how the heck they could do 31 mph on a 20 mph Bosch bike when we have no hills in my neighborhood? Can you get that kind of speed reading by cycling the cranks when the bike is on a workstand?
 
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JayVee

Well-Known Member
My first commute (37 miles) today since the tune-up and new KMC chain. 32F on departure at 5:30 a.m. and 55 on return at 2pm. The XDuro Trekking was buttery smooth. I tripped the 1,000 mile mark (about 8 months after purchase with 2 months no riding).

Odd thing I didn't notice when I picked up the bike at the LBS after the tune-up so I didn't ask them about it. The max speed on my Intuvia display was previously around 26 mph and I did that on the down slope of a freeway overpass. The max speed after the LBS worked on the bike was over 31 mph. I always encourage the techs at my LBS to take my bikes out and ride them anytime they do work for me so I don't mind that they ride them around. But I was just wondering how the heck they could do 31 mph on a 20 mph Bosch bike when we have no hills in my neighborhood? Can you get that kind of speed reading by cycling the cranks when the bike is on a workstand?
Look at the odometer. Maybe they went for a very long ride...

The max. speed on some of the rental bikes I had was crazy. 80km/h and sometimes more in a city environment full of traffic. Sure, there are hills. But who would want to go that fast, and where?
 

Soijai

New Member
I just got my 2017 Xduro Trekking 4.0 a couple weeks ago at clearance pricing and am still making some changes and adjustments. Overall, I really like it.

My perspective is a bit different as I am 6'6" and got the 64cm bike. I have added a Suntour SP12-NCX suspension seatpost, but haven't gotten around to adjusting and testing it much. I also got a Weanas stem riser on Amazon and that has taken some weight off my wrists. The grips that came with the bike are pretty good, but I took the Ergon GP1 grips from my old bike and put them on. I had to build up the bars a little with tape to make the Ergon grips stable as the handlebar diameter is just slightly smaller on the ends than my old bike bars. I also switched out the seat for one I have been using for a while on my old bike.

After about 200 miles, I took off the Haibike rack and replaced it with the Topeak Explorer I had on my old bike. The Haibike rack didn't secure my Topeak EX trunk bag without bungee cords, which were inconvenient to deal with. Also, the lower bar for panniers put the panniers too close to my heels, causing occasional contact. The Haibike rack could support both the trunk bag and panniers, which the Topeak Explorer can't, but I ordered another pannier for when I need more space than one can handle. I'll use the panniers for commuting and just the trunk bag for shorter recreational rides.

I kept the fenders on, so, by replacing the rack, the back of the rear fender has nothing stabilizing it. It is just causing some rattling noise for now though. I'll drill a couple holes where it hits the end of the Topeak rack and secure it there. Also, I had to remove the rear light when I took off the Haibike rack, but I just use my old flashing rear light that clips on to the seat post, which works fine for me.

I also had a Topeak TourGuide DX handlebar bag that I wanted to move to the Haibike, but its mount (Fixer 8) doesn't fit with the Lupine front light and the wide mount for the Intuvia display. I tried using a bar extender, but that didn't work very well. I do see that there is a new Fixer 8E mount that is wider for Ebikes, so I'll probably try that. If the bag won't mount well due to the light, the light will win that conflict. I have been out a couple times in the dark and the Lupine light is way better than anything I have previously used.

For now, I'm using a cheap velcro strap mounted bag that isn't holding up well to the weight of the spare tube, tools and other things I keep there. It's also a bit cramped since it holds significantly less. It's workable for the short term, but I'd like to find something different.

I'm mostly using my bike for a 40 mile per day bike/bus commute and it is great for that. The weight of the the bike does cause some concern on the King County (WA) Metro bus bike racks though. After my first ride I added two 24 inch bungee cords to help secure the bike to the rack as all that weight isn't easily secured by one front wheel brace.

I ride mostly in Eco to conserve battery life and I have found a balance of the right gear to be able to pedal consistently after the first few days. At first, I was in too low a gear and the cadence was hard to maintain, though I was able go a bit faster that way. I got the Ebike to take the strain off my knees, mostly in climbing situations, but want to get as much exercise value out of riding as I can while avoiding strain.

I spent a bunch of time looking around at different models and the Xduro Trekking 4.0 checked all the boxes for me. I really wanted to get the Super Moto X tires on whatever bike I got. They have a great combination of performance and protection and I wanted a wide tire. The only thing that didn't work so well for me was the rack. I am still working out seat comfort tissues, but that should just need some more tweaking.
 
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Soijai

New Member
I forgot to mention that I also changed the pedals. The stock ones were a little too small for me. I also started riding with the front suspension disabled, but have turned it back on and still have no problem being able to do the 40 mile commute on one battery charge.
 

Over50

Well-Known Member
... still have no problem being able to do the 40 mile commute on one battery charge.
Interesting ... how much charge or estimated range do you have left after the 40?

On last week's commute (posted about above), I had 32F, a very light headwind and a full battery on departure. My charge indicator slipped from 5 ticks to 4 at about the 8.5 mile mark riding maybe 50/50 Eco to Tour. At that point I drew the conservative estimate of 40 miles of range under those conditions. I always give the battery a boost just to insure against return headwinds or end of work day fatigue so I've never tested a full commute without additional charge on this bike.

By contrast to that estimate of 40 miles, I commuted yesterday and had 42F on departure, a light cross wind and a full charge. I was 13+ miles into the trip before it slipped from 5 ticks to 4 and I was riding more in Eco. Thus I estimated 65 miles of range under those conditions. I had similar results on the remainder of the commute. It was a surprisingly big difference with given only a 10F temperature difference, slightly more favorable winds and a bit more rider effort.

As i am getting back into shape I am able to do more of the ride in Eco. I would estimate that with yesterday's commute I did 60/40 Eco to Tour. Eco mode with that CX motor is still quite powerful IMO.