Pedalling thru restricted zones with both assist and throttle off?

kloxxe

New Member
I wonder if one could legally "trick" e-bike restrictions by setting assist level to 0 and turning off the throttle - thus pedalling just like a regular bicycle?
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Most ebike regulations use the class system which refers to the equipment mounted on the bike itself. Whether or not the equipment is turned off is irrelevant. Class 1 is pedal assist only up to 20 MPH. Class 2 includes a throttle and assist up to 20 MPH. Class 3 includes pedal assist & throttle up to 28 MPH. Many manufacturers place class# stickers on their bikes which are used by law enforcement. You could be cited anyway even with the PAS & throttle turned off in a restricted area.

There was an article in the paper a couple of week back about someone who was cited for riding an ebike in a town park even though the rider had left the battery home.

Your best bet to avoid being cited is to make you & your bike as inconspicuous as possible and ride in a responsible manner.
 

kloxxe

New Member
It makes sense. Now what I meant above is with reference to below post from a Canadian ebike forum (I'm in Toronto):

In City of Toronto Parks electric bicycles may be ridden on parks roads, but motors should not be used on parks paths and trails. This means that on paths such as the Waterfront - Martin Goodman Trail, Don Valley Trail, or Humber Trail, a Police Officer or bylaw officer may ticket an electric bicycle rider $305.00 for engaging their motor. A electric bicycle user may use their motor while travelling on roadways to arrive to a City Park, but once they enter the park, they must turn off their motor, and propel themselves by pedalling while in the City Park.
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
It makes sense. Now what I meant above is with reference to below post from a Canadian ebike forum (I'm in Toronto):

In City of Toronto Parks electric bicycles may be ridden on parks roads, but motors should not be used on parks paths and trails. This means that on paths such as the Waterfront - Martin Goodman Trail, Don Valley Trail, or Humber Trail, a Police Officer or bylaw officer may ticket an electric bicycle rider $305.00 for engaging their motor. A electric bicycle user may use their motor while travelling on roadways to arrive to a City Park, but once they enter the park, they must turn off their motor, and propel themselves by pedalling while in the City Park.
I wasn't aware of this law. It seems to me that it would be difficult to enforce. Using the throttle and not pedaling would be obvious but how would a LEO know if you are using pedal assist?
 

JayVee

Well-Known Member
In Switerzland, the lawmakers have thrown a nice curveball to their law enforcement officers: 45km/h bikes, which are considered as mopeds, can circulate on paths restricted to mopeds providing that “the motor is off”. I think the lawmakers had the Solex in mind when they wrote the law. But it still applies...
 

raceto100

New Member
I'm in Toronto and have a Haibike Urban Plus. I sometimes ride on trails for exercise but only in the lowest assist or with the motor off.

I found that in the settings of the Cobi.bike app I can rename the assist level labels, so I specifically labeled level 0 as Motor Off. If I get asked about my bike by law enforcement I can show them my screen that says Motor Off. Below is a screenshot of the Cobi settings screen. It's found under Settings - Engine Type - Custom drive mode levels

IMG_6081.PNG
 

harryS

Well-Known Member
In Toronto, I read that your ebikes include vehicles that look like fast motor scooters with pedals. Well, I could see why "ebikes" are banned from your multi-use paths if the definition includes scooters.


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kloxxe

New Member
Well, there are different set of rules apply for e-scooters and e-bikes, e-scooters are banned from bike lanes, etc.. e-bikes (pedelec) are treated as bicycles, but municipalities can/do impose specific e-bike bans by bylaws (multi-use trails, parks, etc...)
 

kloxxe

New Member
I'm in Toronto and have a Haibike Urban Plus. I sometimes ride on trails for exercise but only in the lowest assist or with the motor off.
Do you see it being a real issue, or is it just one of those bylaws that nobody enforces as long as you behave?
 

JRA

Well-Known Member
"There was an article in the paper a couple of week back about someone who was cited for riding an ebike in a town park even though the rider had left the battery home."

That is one of the dumbest things I have ever heard of. Unless the rider was running over old ladies of course.
 

raceto100

New Member
Do you see it being a real issue, or is it just one of those bylaws that nobody enforces as long as you behave?

No, seems like law enforcement and e-bikes is not a big issue here in Toronto, as long as you ride safely no one will bother you.

I really only use the bike trails along the waterfront or through parks when I want to get some exercise and go for distance which is the main reason I use Motor Off or Level 1. When I am commuting or in a hurry I stick to city streets and cruise along at 32kph to 35kph in Level 3. On the street you have to watch out for the "door" prize, zombie texting walkers, and zombie texting drivers.

I rarely use the street bike lanes because cars are often stopped in them (very illegal), I have to deal with scores of slow regular bikers and lawless fast-moving fixie riders.
 
I think it'll depend on your municipality. I've never had an issue on these paths, if it's shared use I never ride above 15mph, which is slower than most people can ride a non-electric bike. Like kloxxe above, I think it'll mostly come down to how you behave, and to an extent what your bike looks like. We can all agree (I hope) that 2000W+ electric motorcycles with ancillary pedals are clearly outside the intent of regulations that let lower power pedalecs be considered bicycles.