Polaris No Longer Make eBikes

jazz

Well-Known Member
Looks like Polaris is out of the ebike game. There website now has limited information with just a landing page and contact page. The official Polaris ebike FaceBook page is now gone. They haven't updated their bike models for 2 years.

I wouldn't buy one at this point as it will be tough to get any warranty honored unless you can get a great deal on one and take your chances.

As an owner of 2 Polaris ebikes this is not good news. I thought that Polaris, a multi-billion dollar company, would succeed.

Not sure why they did not and I can only speculate. The bikes were very well built, nice looking with good quality components. Some of the possible reasons for their demise-- one is that they were just too expensive. You could get a comparable bike for much less. Also, the batteries were just too small and ran at a non-standard 44v. At 6Ah the batteries were just too measly. Another possible reason, they were hard to find due to limited availability in bike shops--which is interesting since Polaris has tons of dealerships. I find it hard to believe they could not also sell these eBikes in their dealerships in addition to bike shops.
 

George S.

Well-Known Member
Interesting. I could see them making a light motorcycle that would have to be registered as a motorcycle. That market is wide open. Maybe a 5 thousand watt motor with a 3 kWh battery and up. With the legal limits for ebikes, it is hard to make something that fits in with their performance image. Maybe an electric Slingshot?

There is a British electric ATV. That's a concept I see developing. There are too many producers in the ebike field, and almost anything can be made in China, imported, and sold with a brand badge on it.

If you put RC packs together in twos, you can make a 44v pack. It's 12 cells. But they really missed the mark on their packs. They have to be thinking electric for some of their other products.
 

pxpaulx

Well-Known Member
Didn't they have an outdoorsy type fat bike? I think the problem is their main market are motorsports buyers who wouldn't be interested in an ebike. Didn't Polaris own brammo electric motor cycles? I could be way off (name might not even be right...).
 

jazz

Well-Known Member
Polaris released their Victory Empulse TT electric motorcycle this year which was just an updated Brammo Empulse. I have a Brammo. Good quality and well built. Support since Polaris took over has gone way down hill. Polaris has been struggling with all their products across the board in 2016.
 

Abe L

New Member
I own 4 Polaris ebikes; what is the recommend environment to store the batteries during the winter-- temp x and humidity level? I live in the cold midwest. Where does one get replacement batteries?
ty
 

jazz

Well-Known Member
I own 4 Polaris ebikes; what is the recommend environment to store the batteries during the winter-- temp x and humidity level? I live in the cold midwest. Where does one get replacement batteries?
ty
This company is stocking parts for Polaris ebikes, email: 3rdpartyebikeservice5@gmail.com

There is lots of different information about storing lithium. I just charge mine up and store them indoors others say charge up to 80% and store. With the Polaris bikes it is easy to remove the batteries and take them indoors.
 
I was reading in the latest issue of "Electric Bike Action" magazine that a new company has taken over the Polaris bike business. PIM Power In Motion is continuing on with the design.
 

jazz

Well-Known Member
I was reading in the latest issue of "Electric Bike Action" magazine that a new company has taken over the Polaris bike business. PIM Power In Motion is continuing on with the design.
Update 1/6/2017 PIM has not been responsive to any of the email or contact form messages I have sent them. Not a good sign for their support of this product.


Yes that is true. Power in Motion (PIM) has taken over; however, not Polaris warranties (as you would expect). PIM can sell you new bikes and parts (not confirmed). You can find them: http://pimbicycles.com.
I am happy someone is continuing the line. I always thought Polaris had great ebike designs and build quality. I was a big fan and proponent of Polaris eBikes.
It will be a big test to see if PIM can make it where Polaris failed.

Having owned a couple Polaris eBikes, the biggest issues I saw:

1) Price. Good, well-built products, but the product line was priced way too high.
2) Low Wh/Ah batteries. 6 aH/290 Wh is very wimpy and well below current eBike averages
3) Proprietary 44v system with high cost for replacement parts. Last year I was quoted $900 for a 6aH replacement battery for my Terrain.

Positives for PIM:

1) Well-built, great looking bikes and good quality components
2) Reliable. I have had no real failures. Even my 1st Gen Vector with 30v battery (from 4 years ago) still working great.


Keys to PIM Success:

1) Lower prices at least 20-25% (over what Polaris sold them for).
2) Component warranty needs to be better than 180 days. 1 year is standard with most companies.
3) Further develop the ebikes. Technology in these bikes is at least 2 years old. Need to explore higher capacity batteries, mid-drive motors, and remove 20 mph limits for off-road use.
4) Increase battery capacity or offer much less expensive 2nd battery options.
5 Improve Marketing. For a company in business for at least the past 6 months, there is very little about PIM anywhere. Need to improve online footprint by leaps and bounds. Not all advertising has to be paid. Social media is free and reviews from people like Court on this website is free. Get Crazy Lenny to carry your line. He sells a s*it ton of ebikes at awesome prices (best anywhere in the world) which will go a long way to proving your brand.
6) Need to put these bikes into the hands of people who can spread the word. Give me one or sell me one at a good, reasonable price and I will spread the word. ;)
 
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I really wanted Polaris to succeed with their ebikes, US company and all that. I think they made 3 critical mistakes, 1) the tiny battery. Why a company that knows big power sells, snowmobiles, 4 wheelers, big street bikes are big HP sports, and they put a flashlight battery in their bikes ??? 2) use a heavy a** direct drive hub motor. When I think Polaris, I think off road HP. direct drive hubs do not do well in slow hard pulls. 3) Dealer network. They have a super network but require dealers to purchase a separate franchise to carry the line. My local Polaris dealer had never even heard of Polaris ebikes until the spring of 2016!! I'm shocked they failed!!
 
I own 4 Polaris ebikes; what is the recommend environment to store the batteries during the winter-- temp x and humidity level? I live in the cold midwest. Where does one get replacement batteries?
ty
RPE in Las Vegas, NV claims they can rebuild or construct any battery for out of date or out of production ebikes or scooters etc. Might be worth looking into if necessary.
 
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jazz

Well-Known Member
I really wanted Polaris to succeed with their ebikes, US company and all that. I think they made 3 critical mistakes, 1) the tiny battery. Why a company that knows big power sells, snowmobiles, 4 wheelers, big street bikes are big HP sports, and they put a flashlight battery in their bikes ??? 2) use a heavy a** direct drive hub motor. When I think Polaris, I think off road HP. direct drive hubs do not do well in slow hard pulls. 3) Dealer network. They have a super network but require dealers to purchase a separate franchise to carry the line. My local Polaris dealer had never even heard of Polaris ebikes until the spring of 2016!! I'm shocked they failed!!
Agree 100%. Polaris is a multi-billion dollar company. They had a decent product, the name recognition, money and dealer network. Poor execution, overpriced and terrible marketing.
 

Bob G

New Member
Would it be possible to add a rear rack and then run a 48v battery directly to the hub motor? Don't most controllers have a range of acceptable voltage input? Or is the controller in the battery assembly and then only the proprietary battery would work.
To me their battery was the fatal flaw, everything else was minor stuff.
 

jazz

Well-Known Member
Would it be possible to add a rear rack and then run a 48v battery directly to the hub motor? Don't most controllers have a range of acceptable voltage input? Or is the controller in the battery assembly and then only the proprietary battery would work.
To me their battery was the fatal flaw, everything else was minor stuff.
Yea I think it would. I have a Terrain and I am going to see if I can put a BBSHD mid-drive on it and eliminate the rear hub motor/controller all-together. I will also modify the downtube battery to use either 48V or 52V minimum 11.4 aH battery. The biggest issue is where to put the new controller I would need.
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
One of our techs gutted out the Terrain and put a Luna mighty mini and Cyclone motor. That thing has a motorcycle like power...
 

_AleX_

New Member
On a tangent, in the context of big automotive brands (motorcycles in this case) expanding into an e-bike line, I present to you the piaggio e-bike series.

It's sort of similar. Their core business is gas powered two wheelers (scooters, vespa, aprilia, guzzi, ...). This is their e-bike: http://www.piaggio.com/wi-bike/en_EN/models/

I especially like the Comfort line:



They are also very reasonably priced for a well engineered product. If I'm not mistaken about 2800 euro, which is average for a factory built e-bike. Don't forget Europe is a totally different market. We love our bikes as utility products for every day, not just weekend toys. So I can see people investing in one of these for the long run, if the reliability is good. With the backing of piaggio and multiple sales points (their dealerships) could really work.

And i have to say, they're probably well built. IGH, belt drive (no lubricants, long life time, no noise, ...) Mid drive, torque sensing, and the switchgear looks like it came from a motorcycle, very well designed. The frame as well looks properly solid, and the joints and seems with the engine unit look tight, overbuilt, and well matched together. I haven't tested one yet. They are heavy, but I'm just starting out in getting familiar with e-bikes so I have no real benchmark. Maybe all e-bikes are heavy like this.

Let's hope they carry their e-bike line longer and with more focus than polaris has done.
 

jazz

Well-Known Member
Update 1/6/2017:

PIM has not been responsive to any of the emails or contact form messages I have sent them. Not a good sign for their support of continuing the Polaris line of ebikes. At this point, I would stay far away from this company or from buying any used Polaris ebikes.