Quick-E+

Onewbrew

New Member
I talked to John at Giant NZ and they said "Unfortunately they are unavailable and will be for a while we have about 6 on back order with Giant and are waiting for them. They have no ETA"

Any pannier fit well without the Mik Rack adapter?
Yeah I’ve got a Kathmandu pannier (no longer sold) that works, wanting something a bit bigger so waiting for mik adapter
 

M8tt

New Member
Been riding the Quick-E for about 4 months now and I'm very ready to upgrade to a 48T chan ring.
For those that have upgraded or have general experience upgrading... Do you also need to upgrade to a slightly longer chain? or was the existing length (with 42t setup) still suitable? Thanks
 

Berserker26

Member
Been riding the Quick-E for about 4 months now and I'm very ready to upgrade to a 48T chan ring.
For those that have upgraded or have general experience upgrading... Do you also need to upgrade to a slightly longer chain? or was the existing length (with 42t setup) still suitable? Thanks
You will definitely need a longer chain, adding 6 teeth to the chainring will make for a very very tight chain. Good practise on any bike is to change the chain whenever you change a chainring or cassette, even if it's just like for like with no size change.
 

Alan111S

Member
I have a 48T and I've managed with the original chain just fine. However, I will upgrade it when it needs changing.
 

gorse

Member
Hi from Germany!
This is my quick +e FS 2019



Meanwhile i added a Racktime rack deck and i´m about to order a jones h-bar, because the Giant bar is really uncomfortable on longer rides.

Daniel
Congrats and a nicely framed shot. Interesting to see the suspension fork on a Quick E
 
I passed the 1000km mark recently on my 2019 Quick E+ and thought an update was in order. The short summary is the Giant quick E+ is an awesome bike when it works BUT a pain in the backside when things go wrong, particularly if you live in NZ where we don't seem to have ready access to spare parts. I've now experienced most issues that have been outlined on this thread :-( If you are going to be using this as your main mode of transport make sure you are mechanically inclined and/or have a good local bike mechanic who knows their stuff, my bet is you will see them fairly regularly.

Here's a quick summary of issues I have experienced (with suggested resolutions where known). I've listed them in decreasing order of level of annoyance/hassle

1) My controller died on my first really wet ride, meaning I couldn't turn my bike on any more. My local bike shop had several other Giant E bikes with the same issue, so I suspect a manufacturing defect that allows moisture in. The bike shop said that for some of the other customers they had fitted a different controller (the ride control one https://www.giant-bicycles.com/gb/showcase/ridecontrol-one ) to tide them over as the replacements were a while away. The ride control one doesn't come with a display but my mechanic hasn't heard of anyone having issues with that type dying in the wet. They didn't do that for me as replacement evo controllers would be arriving "soon" but unfortunately soon turned out to be 4 weeks :-( In retrospect I should have asked for the ride control one to be fitted while I waited, as a month without my main means of transport was super annoying. No issues with my replacement evo controller as yet, hopefully they found a way to make it water proof. If it fails again I'll be switching to the ride control one despite the fact it doesn't come with a display.

2) I developed issues with not being able to shift down into the smallest rear sprocket (the chain would keep jumping back to the second smallest sprocket). I had the derailleur adjusted by three different mechanics in three different shops without solving this problem. Finally a mechanic suggested that I had worn out my rear sprocket and that I should replace it. I was very surprised that it would have worn out so quickly (the problem started showing up after just a few weeks of riding and continued intermittently). Fortunately I didn't need to replace the entire cassette, it turns out you can buy just a single sprocket (although whether they will be able to get one in quickly is another matter). The mechanic reckons the replacement sprocket looks stronger than the original and so far I haven't had too many problems with the rear cassette now that the sprocket has been replaced. I'm being a bit more careful with my shifting and also now try to use some of the other gears a bit more (from years of single speed riding I tended just to sit in the hardest gear). Given the difficulty I've had in sourcing parts, I grabbed a spare sprocket when they were in stock. IMPORTANT TIP, make sure the little lever on your derailleur is switched to on, if it is off there is more slack in the chain and I think this may have contributed to this problem (only switch it off when removing the back wheel and then make sure you switch it back on again).

3) When the chain comes off the front chain ring and gets stuck between the motor and the chain ring it is a SERIOUS hassle to get it unstuck. There is just enough clearance for it to get in but not out again (at least not without damaging something). This is a major design flaw in my mind, a few mm extra clearance would have removed the issue) I've had the chain get stuck 3 times now and am wondering if there is some modification that will either prevent the chain from coming off or make it easier to get back on. The only solution I came up with in order to free the chain was to completely remove the chain ring, which is fiddly, messy and time consuming (and also risks losing small parts). This can be done on the road side armed with just an allen key but it takes me about 15-20 minutes and I end up with grease all over my hands.

Taking the chain ring off requires removing four allen bolts, taking the guard off and then the chain ring off (you don't have to remove the crank to do this). Be very careful not to lose either the 4 bolts or the 4 "nuts" (first time I did this I spent ages hunting some that had rolled away). You can then easily free the chain, then comes the much trickier part of reassembling the chain ring. I've yet to come up with a nice quick way to do this, the problem is that it is very hard to keep the "nuts" in place when putting the chain ring back in place (they tend to fall out as nothing is holding them in place until the bolt goes in). Best I've come up with is to do one at a time, rotating the chain ring around to where my fingers can just about hold the nut in place from behind, while screwing in the bolt. Maybe if I taped them in place onto the chain ring it would be easier. Also remember to put the chain guard on the right way around, it is easy to install it backwards and then your chain won't fit back on.

My mechanic had someone come in with their chain stuck on the same model and I was curious to see how they dealt with it so I stuck around. They spent 10 minutes trying to free it before resorting to brute force and some sort of tool that I don't carry with me to try and move things - so it isn't just me.

4) The integrated pannier rack looks great but I had issues with it not quite fitting my ortlieb panniers. The fix was to by the MIK rack deck: https://www.giant-bicycles.com/nz/mik-rack-deck-2019 which solved the problem BUT I had to wait about three months for it to arrive (getting spart parts seems to be a real issue in our corner of the world)

5) My rear wheel started rubbing on the frame. Fortunately I had read about this kind of problem and as I expected the wheel was no longer sitting properly in the drop outs). I loosened off the quick release, re-adjusted the position, and tightened it back up really tight. So far the issue hasn't returned but I'll be keeping a close eye on this.

6) The display that mounts on the handle bars occasionally fogs up on the inside (presumably moisture getting in). I had this replaced under warranty but my replacement unit has the same issue. The moisture does seem to disappear after riding for a while in the sunshine but it does make it hard to read speed etc until the display defogs. Annoying but not a show stopper.

7) The handle bar grips aren't particularly good at damping out vibration and I often end up with numb/tingling hands. I didn't have this problem on my previous bike. I've upgraded to some different grips to see if this solves the issue: https://www.giant-bicycles.com/nz/ergo-max-plus-lock-on-grips-w--bar-ends Too early to tell if this will solve the problem although I'm enjoying being able to use the bar ends. It should be noted that the controller that mounts on the handlebar is designed to slot into a particular style of giant grip (lock on ones), so your options are limited (unless you butcher a giant grip and cut a bit off so that you can still mount the controller while using a different grip.

8) Lost the screw that held the rear mudguard in place - not a biggy, just needed to take the wheel out, find a screw that fitted and replace it.

I've also had a couple of punctures so far but that's to be expected if you commute any sort of distance regularly.

Given all the issues, would I buy a Giant Quick E+ again? For me the biggest selling point was the 45km/h speed and I've yet to see anything similar on the NZ market that looks better than the Giant Quick E+. A lower maintenance, hassle free E bike with a 45km/h speed limit would be my preference but I'm not sure one exists.
 

Berserker26

Member
Great write-up Peter.

Sounds like we can avoid a few of those now we know from your experience. Just on the computer in the wet, where do you think the water was getting in? Might be something some laminate clear paper can fix?
 

M8tt

New Member
I passed the 1000km mark recently on my 2019 Quick E+ and thought an update was in order. The short summary is the Giant quick E+ is an awesome bike when it works BUT a pain in the backside when things go wrong, particularly if you live in NZ where we don't seem to have ready access to spare parts. I've now experienced most issues that have been outlined on this thread :-( If you are going to be using this as your main mode of transport make sure you are mechanically inclined and/or have a good local bike mechanic who knows their stuff, my bet is you will see them fairly regularly.
Thanks for the update Peter. I can totally relate (being another NZ user) and experiencing a lot of similar issues.

- Waterproofing... absolute total shocker imo. Huge fail from Giant. Mine has display fogging too and water filling up in the controller (triggering the dreaded "walk-mode" issues among others). So much fun. I'm now pretty-much a regular at my local bike mechanic (in Britomart Auckland) who seem to always have a Quick-e+ (2019) their being repaired. I'm actually in the process of opening up the electronic components myself, drying them out and re-waterproofing them properly with Sikaflex 291 (marine adhesive/sealant). I have had experience with this sort of stuff before so i'm not too phased by it. Pretty annoying thing to have to do considering the thousands $$$ i've paid for the bike.

- I'm not experiencing shifting problems. My local cycle store now stocks the two highest gear sprockets separately since their all their quick-e customers have been wearing through them pretty hard. I personally don't think that Giant have got their gearing ratios right since the users of the 45kph models are always max'd out on the two highest gears (which as a result wear like crazy). Unfortunately modifying the setup to remedy the problem (upgrading to 48t chainring for example) supposedly voids the warranty. And voiding the Quick-e warranty is a risky business considering all the faults cropping up.

- I haven't had any chain issues thankfully, sounds like a nightmare experience for you. Maybe change to a slightly slimmer (11 speed) chain to solve the jamming problems???

- Yep, standard rear 'rack' is pretty useless for fitting with anything really useful. I've ordered the MIK Rack attachment and have been waiting over THREE months for them to come into NZ. Bit of a joke that Giant hasn't predicted the demand for a functional rack solution for the Quick-e considering its positioned in the market as a commuter bike... should really have come as a standard part. It looks like they still haven't got it right with the 2020 models either!?

- Rear wheel problems... yep, tick for me too. When I first purchased mine I went in to pick it up and the rear guard was completely out of alignment with the rear wheel. It was was actually rubbing on the rear rack pretty badly. They blamed it on "factory tolerances". The mechanics tried a bunch of things to fix the problem without luck. I told them i'm not riding it home in it's current state so left it with them to resolve. They supposedly got the friendly local Giant rep in and they somehow re-aligned it.

So yea, I really did expect more from Giant to be honest... especially with the electronics waterproofing which is a major fail. However, despite all the issues I don't regret buying one (yet) .... i'm so much happier being a cycle commuter despite Auckland drivers trying their very best to murder me (have been recently been knocked off in a hit & run incident). Fun times.
 

gorse

Member
I sprayed the Evo display seams, all cable entry ports (including the frame ports) and the controller button assembly with CRC 808 Silicon. It won't cause harm and will help resist water ingress. If it's absolutely hosing down or the bike is being transported on a rack in rain, I'll put a latex glove over the display. My Trance E mates have had issues with water getting into the controller requiring replacement.

To be fair, all eBikes are subject to the same water proofing issues. A friend who is a lead designer on the Paparoa Track (worth googling, it will be awesome) told me the contractors bought a bunch of ebikes for getting to the work site and they've all had issues with water damage, including Specialized Levo, Trek Powerfly etc, so it's a common problem.

Shifting and drivetrain issues are common to any bike - become your own bike mechanic or become poor. Park Tools website has some easy to follow advice: https://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help?query=&sort=postDate+desc&area[]=52
 
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M8tt

New Member
Great write-up Peter.

Sounds like we can avoid a few of those now we know from your experience. Just on the computer in the wet, where do you think the water was getting in? Might be something some laminate clear paper can fix?
I've stripped back and taken apart my controller and LCD screen (because of water ingress issues) and think with my controller, the water was getting in through the connection where the cables feed into the unit. I've discovered that the waterproofing overall is pretty minimal, however on mine, at that cable joint weak point, the sealant had actually come away from the cables (since they're are naturally prone to movement). The interior connection wasn't any better, the adhesive hadn't properly adhered to the interior plastic around the cables either (so it was just sitting there a bit like a loose plug). Travelling at speed, any water running along those cables will eventually be forced into the unit. Once the water is in the controller it runs down to the lowest point and collects where the walk-mode button is (which eventually triggers the connection and the bike then goes for a bit of a walk). Open it, pour the water out, dry it up, seal it again with good quality flexible adhesive-sealant and it should work fine as mine did (check if there is any corrosion first).

As for the LCD screen fogging. I removed the outer black metal casing to investigate.. and from there is was clear that they had only used a very small and patchy amount of sealant. Once the sealant was pealed away away I discovered that the unit was actually super-glued and fused up tight so I didn't get inside LCD unit itself (since cutting and drilling out the glue would have been a mission and probably done some damage). There were however a few gaps that the sealant hadn't covered, and the superglue was patchy. So with the LCD screen i'm not entirely clear where the water was getting in. I suspect it could be along the cables as well. I did take off the plastic front panel to dry out the moisture, and the screen glue (double sided foam adhesive) is very thin along the top edge of the display, so that may have been a weak point too. There was only a small amount of moisture inside the LCD screen, so opening up the USB port cover and leaving it in the sun for a few house would probably be a quick fix, but would not solve the problem. I'm thoroughly re-waterproofing my unit to avoid the lengthy repair waits others are experiencing in New Zealand.
 

M8tt

New Member
@gorse Far out. Sounds like the eBike industry seriously needs to some learn some things from the marine electronics industry. I've a Garmin fish-finder (on my kayak) that's still going strong after a decade! 'Big Bicycle' are all charging a premium for a product that's not fit for purpose. They all need to pick up their game.
 

gorse

Member
I think you're right - motorbikes don't have these issues and they're full of electronics, even dirt bikes have computers
 
Looks like many of the components are similar. The major difference is the frame design which doesn't look like it uses a top pull energypak (despite that being listed in the technologies section here: https://www.giant-bicycles.com/nz/fastroad-ex-eplus-pro--25km-h--32km-h--45km-h--28mph--2020 ). Also the energypak is listed as a 375, which implies a smaller capacity than the energypak 500. I like the look of the frame, very sleek, but am not sure I wold trade down from 500Wh. I assume this is a new kind of energypak as it doesn't look like a top pull, side pull or downtube design. I can't see how it would detach.
 

ChrisLoewen

New Member
Peter, Great write up on issues you’ve had.

It hasn’t rained here in California for several months since I bought the bike so I haven’t run into the waterproofing issue. Good to know about though! I’ll be careful to watch out for the rain now.

I recently (1300 miles) replaced my cassette and a new chain on because I was having issues with the smallest gear skipping. I didn’t realize I could replace a single gear - good to know. (This is also my third chain since buying the bike - first one snapped at 890 miles)

My bike odometer is now at 1400 miles (2250km).

A new thing I ran into was the repair wrench showed up at about 1800 km but the phone app said everything was working fine. I took the bike into the shop and they installed a new firmware update on the bike. The bike store guy thought the light came on at 1800km to get you to come in for regularly scheduled maintenance.

I’m currently on my third back wheel. The first two have literally cracked down the center - I suspect due to mostly my weight (320lbs) and maybe the wheel being slightly out of alignment(?). Both previous wheels were replaced under warranty. Anyways, my current back wheel is a stronger mountain bike rim (looks the same but different brand) that my LBS built for me.

One more issue I ran into when I was having my cassette replaced - the bike repair guy noticed that one of my engine mount bolts had slipped (loosened) and my front crankset was slightly wobbling. He tightened it back up but 100 miles later and I’ve noticed it start to have a slight wobble again. I noticed last time I road that if I have my feet in the pedals with any pressure it won’t go into the smallest (hardest) gear - I suspect due to the small wobble (?) ( it’s a brand new chain and cassette). I’m probably going to have to take it back to the shop to get it looked at again this week.

Anyways, despite all of these issues I’m still enjoying the bike and am glad I bought it.
 

Berserker26

Member
What's the biggest tires you can fit on the Quick E? Mine has the 2.25 Schwalbe G-Ones - thinking of the 2.4 or 2.8 Super Moto X if they'll fit.