RadBurro as E-RV - Am I Crazy?

poorplayer

Member
Recently I watched Court's review of the Rad Power RadBurro, a very beefy trike designed to replace things like maintenance golf carts, utility carts, and small delivery vans. It has accessories such as a flat palette base, a delivery cargo box, a truck box, and even a pedicab attachment. While watching the review video, I couldn't help but have the thought - why not a mini-RV unit? You could feasibly use the flat palette as a base and build out from there, in much the same way as people build tiny homes on top of flat trailer frames. I could even imagine the rear portion engineered like the Hitch Hotel, which expands out from a 60 cubic foot storage to a 135 cubic foot space about 7' long and 3' wide. If this thing is designed to hold and transport 700lbs, it should theoretically work as a one-person electric bike/RV.

Am I crazy? Or better yet, is anyone out there crazy enough to design and build such a thing?
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
Recently I watched Court's review of the Rad Power RadBurro, a very beefy trike designed to replace things like maintenance golf carts, utility carts, and small delivery vans. It has accessories such as a flat palette base, a delivery cargo box, a truck box, and even a pedicab attachment. While watching the review video, I couldn't help but have the thought - why not a mini-RV unit? You could feasibly use the flat palette as a base and build out from there, in much the same way as people build tiny homes on top of flat trailer frames. I could even imagine the rear portion engineered like the Hitch Hotel, which expands out from a 60 cubic foot storage to a 135 cubic foot space about 7' long and 3' wide. If this thing is designed to hold and transport 700lbs, it should theoretically work as a one-person electric bike/RV.

Am I crazy? Or better yet, is anyone out there crazy enough to design and build such a thing?
I watched the video review the day it was posted and I was impressed by the offering. I see it as a commercial offering only. A business with private property campus or a pedicab business. A business could get the proper permits, license and insurance. There are just too many questions for private citizen use. The weight alone would preclude this from use anywhere as an unlicensed ebike. Then there's the possible power issues. It just doesn't meet any regulations for public property on road or off road use. It's really nice though.
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
One concern would be the gearing for pedal assist. It says 20mph, but no idea at what speed you pedal out and have to go to the throttle. Another would be the width while highway riding. Hugging the shoulder on a bicycle is a lot different that taking half the lane. I'd guarantee you'd have a lot more close calls with the Burro. I watched a movie about a guy who rode a lawn tractor pulling a trailer across Iowa, so if you are crazy, you could just join that club of crazy.
 
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Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
Recently I watched Court's review of the Rad Power RadBurro, a very beefy trike designed to replace things like maintenance golf carts, utility carts, and small delivery vans. It has accessories such as a flat palette base, a delivery cargo box, a truck box, and even a pedicab attachment. While watching the review video, I couldn't help but have the thought - why not a mini-RV unit? You could feasibly use the flat palette as a base and build out from there, in much the same way as people build tiny homes on top of flat trailer frames. I could even imagine the rear portion engineered like the Hitch Hotel, which expands out from a 60 cubic foot storage to a 135 cubic foot space about 7' long and 3' wide. If this thing is designed to hold and transport 700lbs, it should theoretically work as a one-person electric bike/RV.

Am I crazy? Or better yet, is anyone out there crazy enough to design and build such a thing?
There are various designs to support your idea. Not all of them are practical but it is cool to see this kind of creative thinking.
Check out some of the designs in this video:

 

poorplayer

Member
There are various designs to support your idea. Not all of them are practical but it is cool to see this kind of creative thinking.
Check out some of the designs in this video:
Thanks - this was quite interesting. One could imagine a package that could bolt onto the palette platform and fold out into a tent, following the design template of a lot of these offerings. I was thinking of something that required no set-up at all - just open the door and climb in - but that may be too impractical.
 

poorplayer

Member
I watched the video review the day it was posted and I was impressed by the offering. I see it as a commercial offering only. A business with private property campus or a pedicab business. A business could get the proper permits, license and insurance. There are just too many questions for private citizen use. The weight alone would preclude this from use anywhere as an unlicensed ebike. Then there's the possible power issues. It just doesn't meet any regulations for public property on road or off road use. It's really nice though.
Classification is an interesting conundrum. Not fast enough and probably too wide for state roads/shoulders, too large for bike paths. But if this thing can be ridden unlicensed and (presumably) uninsured on city streets for delivery, why not on state road shoulders? It's a gray area for me, and I don't have enough knowledge about licensing and regulations to know what might be legal. As a frame of reference, I am still confounded by the fact that people only need a non-commercial drivers license to drive massive Class A motorhomes or tow 40' fifth wheels.
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
Classification is an interesting conundrum. Not fast enough and probably too wide for state roads/shoulders, too large for bike paths. But if this thing can be ridden unlicensed and (presumably) uninsured on city streets for delivery, why not on state road shoulders? It's a gray area for me, and I don't have enough knowledge about licensing and regulations to know what might be legal. As a frame of reference, I am still confounded by the fact that people only need a non-commercial drivers license to drive massive Class A motorhomes or tow 40' fifth wheels.
It's not about license or insurance for riding on the highway. Most state laws are written that a bicycle can use the entire lane. But it's about safety. Riding at 16mph down a two lane highway and going over a hill. Coming up from behind is an 18 wheeler at 65mph and crests the hill to see you there. That's the issue! Another issue is all the crap on the side of the road, even on the shoulder. Lots of broken glass, nails, screws, and who knows what. So riding the shoulder has it's own dangers to your tires.
 

poorplayer

Member
One concern would be the gearing for pedal assist. It says 20mph, but no idea how at what speed you pedal out and have to go to the throttle. Another would be the width while highway riding. Hugging the shoulder on a bicycle is a lot different that taking half the lane. I'd guarantee you'd have a lot more close calls with the Burro. I watched a movie about a guy who rode a lawn tractor pulling a trailer across Iowa, so if you are crazy, you could just join that club of crazy.
Haha! The dimensions say that the width of the Rad Burro is 45", which is 3'9", which is 3" shorter than the average shoulder width of a 2-lane state highway (following general specifications for highways when possible). So this will fit inside the average shoulder when available. I may be a little crazy, but I would like to be as safe as possible. Lights, hi-viz marking, blazes on the rear.
 

poorplayer

Member
It's not about license or insurance for riding on the highway. Most state laws are written that a bicycle can use the entire lane. But it's about safety. Riding at 16mph down a two lane highway and going over a hill. Coming up from behind is an 18 wheeler at 65mph and crests the hill to see you there. That's the issue! Another issue is all the crap on the side of the road, even on the shoulder. Lots of broken glass, nails, screws, and who knows what. So riding the shoulder has it's own dangers to your tires.
Totally agree. What you say is absolutely true. But I would assume the same hazards apply to any bike cruising a highway shoulder, especially pulling a trailer. I would totally consider decking out the rear panel with as much safety paraphernalia as possible.
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
Classification is an interesting conundrum. Not fast enough and probably too wide for state roads/shoulders, too large for bike paths. But if this thing can be ridden unlicensed and (presumably) uninsured on city streets for delivery, why not on state road shoulders? It's a gray area for me, and I don't have enough knowledge about licensing and regulations to know what might be legal. As a frame of reference, I am still confounded by the fact that people only need a non-commercial drivers license to drive massive Class A motorhomes or tow 40' fifth wheels.
A lot of states require an ebike be under 100 pounds to classify as a bike. If it's a moped, then DOT regs come into play.

Right now ebike tech is moving faster than government can. It was the same in the early days of automobiles and motorcycles. "Break neck speed" was thought to be 40+ mph. Most of the current ebike laws will have to revised to allow for some of these new designs to work. I'm glad to see companies like Rad taking a chance. Bikes like this will never be accepted unless they exist.

Having done a lot of commuting, I'd be very nervous riding something this wide on the road. People in cages have no patience for pedal power.
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
Totally agree. What you say is absolutely true. But I would assume the same hazards apply to any bike cruising a highway shoulder, especially pulling a trailer. I would totally consider decking out the rear panel with as much safety paraphernalia as possible.
I rode on Historic Route 66 on my 66th birthday. I kept one eye on the mirror, because the pavement was less than 1' past the painted stripe. The people were extremely courteous and gave me plenty of room. But I was always ready to hit the gravel if I had to. We've had 16 state troopers hit on the side of the road in Illinois this year. If flashing red lights on top of a car isn't enough for people to move over, a safety placard doesn't have a chance.
 

poorplayer

Member
I rode on Historic Route 66 on my 66th birthday. I kept one eye on the mirror, because the pavement was less than 1' past the painted stripe. The people were extremely courteous and gave me plenty of room. But I was always ready to hit the gravel if I had to. We've had 16 state troopers hit on the side of the road in Illinois this year. If flashing red lights on top of a car isn't enough for people to move over, a safety placard doesn't have a chance.
Hey - I did Rt. 66 at 66 as well - but in a Mazda 3 Hatchback :cool: