RadRover -vs- RipCurrent

#1
Considering these two, and I guess I'll post in the Juiced thread as well, but here is what I think I know so far:

RadRover:

Likely better support from Rad
Solid design, good ergonomics
Standard components easily modified or replaced
Has larger, easier to read display
Nice front rack mounting points
Has more comfort ride setup WRG to bars, seat (which I like)
Extra battery is somewhat reasonable in cost

Mods: Can add ~$200 aftermarket controller / display to add a bit of power or control current delivery in PAS modes
? Any way to add a torque sensor to the above controller (or the stock one)?

Juiced RipCurrent or RipCurrent S

Perhaps should expect less in the way of factory support
Some concern over spokes breaking etc...
Uses same motor as RR
Uses smaller display (could be harder to see if your eyes aren't great)
No front rack mounting on frame
Has 52V option which should increase speed potential slightly, not much effect on range unless going with high capacity packs (heavier)
Expensive batteries (esp. 52v)
Has torque sensor (how well does it work? Is it that much better of a ride experience than w/out it (Rad Rover)?
Apparently can use 48v or 52v battery, which is nice.
Controller is mounted inside frame?? (Could limit changing it to a different model)?
Hydro brakes -vs- mechanical
RC Slightly more expensive
RCS a lot more expensive
Ripcurrent S has more aggressive riding position / bars (not good for me)
Ripcurrent (regular one) is not in stock - no idea how common this is or if it will be back in stock


Would assume range / speed on a 48v 13ah Ripcurrent -vs- a RadRover should be almost identical under same conditions? (same motor, same watt hour batteries more or less, equiv. bike weights)

Thanks for insights from anyone who has had both or has ridden both, or has other useful info to add.
 
#2
I choose the Rad because of the better display and the twist throttle. As far as brakes I wouldn’t want them any “better”. Wheels locking up and sliding out from me on sandy roads isn’t “better” for me. Same as locking up the front wheel on dry pavement.
 
#3
I have no basis for comparison to anything else but I have a little over 500 miles on my RadRover and I am very happy with it. I agree with Copperbill, but, again, I've never used hydraulic brakes. If I had them I'd probably brag about them, but I don't and I have never had the least bit of trouble or concern about stopping.

TT
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
#5
Has torque sensor (how well does it work? Is it that much better of a ride experience than w/out it (Rad Rover)?
Apparently can use 48v or 52v battery, which is nice.
Controller is mounted inside frame?? (Could limit changing it to a different model)?
  1. Ripcurrent would be lot more enjoyable to ride than Rad. Torque sensor is $175+, a cadence sensor is $12.
    This is what sets two bikes aapart.
  2. Hydro brakes are less maintenance than mech.
  3. Ripcurrent comes with shimano cassette, not a freewheel like the Rad.
Would assume range / speed on a 48v 13ah Ripcurrent -vs- a RadRover should be almost identical under same conditions? (same motor, same watt hour batteries more or less, equiv. bike weights)
Torque sensor maximizes your range. Cadence sensor just picks up speed when you don't want it and exerts more energy.

All of this doesn't matter if you are new to eBikes, you will be thrilled with either of them.
 
#6
  1. Ripcurrent would be lot more enjoyable to ride than Rad. Torque sensor is $175+, a cadence sensor is $12.
    This is what sets two bikes aapart.
  2. Hydro brakes are less maintenance than mech.
  3. Ripcurrent comes with shimano cassette, not a freewheel like the Rad.


Torque sensor maximizes your range. Cadence sensor just picks up speed when you don't want it and exerts more energy.

All of this doesn't matter if you are new to eBikes, you will be thrilled with either of them.
Thanks for the reply.

I've ridden a Pedego that had a torque sensor (cadence also), but it felt like nothing more than the cadence sensor many bikes (like the Rad Rover etc...) have. Felt like an on / off switch.

On the other hand, I've ridden some of the Yamaha and Bosh bikes with torque sensor (both mid drives), and they have a totally different feel in the motor assist department.

So I do realize that on paper, the Juiced has that advantage.

But there can be major differences in the way torque sensors "feel", and I was wondering how well the one on the Juiced bikes works, because the one on the Pedego (which was $4K) may as well have been unplugged - it was pretty much worthless. The Pedego bike with the torque sensor was hub drive, like the Juiced and Rad, BTW.
 

vincent

Active Member
#7
I have ridden the rip current and the torque sensor is a lot different than rad bikes, nothing like any pedegos or other cadence bikes I have ridden- much smoother pas

that being said I own an older rad rover so their programming may be a lot different than mine now

but for me the option of the bigger batteries, the hydraulic brakes and the torque sensor on the juiced bike is worth it

rad is a great company with better customer service though

will depend on what is most important to you