Rear rack on Fullnine

#1
I would never have considered fitting a rack on a full suspension bike until now.
So the story goes, my wife & I bought Fullnine's to ride trails together.
Which we did for a while, but she is now just using hers for work.
I was looking to replace it with a trekking or similar to be more suitable for her.
In the old days you would just hang the bike on the wall in the garage & buy a new one.
But with the cost of an ebike today, you are less likely to do that.
I have tried a few dealers but they don't want trade-ins, so you are left with trying to sell it.
I have advertised it but haven't been rushed with offers.
So as a plan B, I am considering transforming it into trekking mode.
Basically that means fitting full mudguards & a rear rack for her handbag & stuff.
Mudguards are not a problem, but the rack is not so easy.
I have been searching the net for a suitable setup, but are still looking.
Would like one that is attached to the frame, not just the seat post.
Was wondering if anyone could recommend one & give me a part number so I could source it.
Bearing in mind I am down under in New Zealand.
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
#2
I would never have considered fitting a rack on a full suspension bike until now.
So the story goes, my wife & I bought Fullnine's to ride trails together.
Which we did for a while, but she is now just using hers for work.
I was looking to replace it with a trekking or similar to be more suitable for her.
In the old days you would just hang the bike on the wall in the garage & buy a new one.
But with the cost of an ebike today, you are less likely to do that.
I have tried a few dealers but they don't want trade-ins, so you are left with trying to sell it.
I have advertised it but haven't been rushed with offers.
So as a plan B, I am considering transforming it into trekking mode.
Basically that means fitting full mudguards & a rear rack for her handbag & stuff.
Mudguards are not a problem, but the rack is not so easy.
I have been searching the net for a suitable setup, but are still looking.
Would like one that is attached to the frame, not just the seat post.
Was wondering if anyone could recommend one & give me a part number so I could source it.
Bearing in mind I am down under in New Zealand.
@Mike TowpathTraveler has a great setup. Look for photos shared by him. You can also look into his profile and find out.
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
#7
I would never have considered fitting a rack on a full suspension bike until now.
So the story goes, my wife & I bought Fullnine's to ride trails together.
Which we did for a while, but she is now just using hers for work.
I was looking to replace it with a trekking or similar to be more suitable for her.
In the old days you would just hang the bike on the wall in the garage & buy a new one.
But with the cost of an ebike today, you are less likely to do that.
I have tried a few dealers but they don't want trade-ins, so you are left with trying to sell it.
I have advertised it but haven't been rushed with offers.
So as a plan B, I am considering transforming it into trekking mode.
Basically that means fitting full mudguards & a rear rack for her handbag & stuff.
Mudguards are not a problem, but the rack is not so easy.
I have been searching the net for a suitable setup, but are still looking.
Would like one that is attached to the frame, not just the seat post.
Was wondering if anyone could recommend one & give me a part number so I could source it.
Bearing in mind I am down under in New Zealand.

https://electricbikereview.com/foru...sist-and-regular-bike-feel.26240/#post-174736
 
#8
Rocky: That bike is too nice to consider moving out where there is an alternative out there. After a lot of thought and consideration, including thoughts of using those clunky looking Thules; even considering drilling holes in the rear suspension triangle to accept riv-nuts that will allow attachment of a more traditional rack installation, I found the answer in the Old Man Mountain rack that works in conjunction with The Robert Axle Project and their most excellent custom made thru-axles. I have the Haibike Full FatSix as Ravi noted here. Enclosed are some pictures of the front Bluto suspension fork installation. The rack I have here is the OMM Phat Sherpa......

I deviated a bit here. OMM supplies hardware as well as the cushioned clamps made of plain or a coated steel. I replaced that hardware with stainless steel bits off of ebay. The OMM supplied quick release which is used on the front Bluto is a bright aluminum finish q/r lever; so again ebay to the rescue with a more subdued Hope q/r release lever that I adapted to the extra-long skewer supplied in the OMM kit. The OMM stand off legs that attach to the Robert Axle Project thru axle, as well as the two extenders were taken to a local powder coater who finished these parts in a nice matte black powder coat. All told, it was a fun project, though keep in mind the OMM rack set up is not a cheap one; but it is the best engineeered IMO as it puts the weight of the rack and the gear directly onto the thru axle, where it should be.

Being in NZ, I'd advise calling OMM in the morning, before 9am Pacific Coast Time, to talk directly to the owner and express your needs.

I pretty much have most of the parts needed for the OMM Phat Sherpa rear rack project for the Full FatSix. Awaiting on a rear tail light bracket and then it's off to the powder coater. Plans are to detail the installation here in the Haibike forum for reference by any future Haibike Full FatSix owners.

Let us know what you decide to do. We love to read of owner modifications that can be of benefit to everyone!

Mike
 

Attachments

#9
I bought this Thule rack before returning it and getting the Old Man Mountain. This Thule rack was truly a piece of crap. Cheap, weak aluminum and plastic. The "fitting system" is nylon straps and weak plastic buckles - very hard to adjust - then they work loose after a little riding. The plastic breaks easily. Capacity is only 20 pounds, per the package. Difficult or impossible to level it. In summary, the worst. Thule should take it off the market. Fortunately, REI took it back.
 
#10
I bought this Thule rack before returning it and getting the Old Man Mountain. This Thule rack was truly a piece of crap. Cheap, weak aluminum and plastic. The "fitting system" is nylon straps and weak plastic buckles - very hard to adjust - then they work loose after a little riding. The plastic breaks easily. Capacity is only 20 pounds, per the package. Difficult or impossible to level it. In summary, the worst. Thule should take it off the market. Fortunately, REI took it back.
This forum is most valuable when the collected real-world experiences of bikes and gear are posted for all to read and consider.

Clyde, I looked at that rack and considered long and hard over it as there really aren't a lot of choices out there for a thru-axle set up on a bike with no threaded frame attachments, like the Haibike mtb series.

The turn off for me were those straps and clamps, just begging to come loose. And all the while when on the trail, collecting dust; the straps helping to wear the paint away underneath them!

Just too funky of a design for my liking!
 
#11
Thanks for the replies.
Some good information there, especially the comments on the Thule rack.
I think I'll flag that one.
The Old Man Mountain rack looks good & solid but I think it would work out too expensive for me, with shipping costs added on.
There are quite a few on ebay similar to that but with unsuitable mounts.
I might be better off getting one of those & modifying or making up custom mounts.
 
#14
Having said that, I mean, don't want to hang anything from the seat post.
A Haibike Fullnine is fairly tall & I want to keep the centre of gravity as low as possible.
So if one or even two saddlebags were to be added later, the COG would be lower if they were hung from a rack/carrier fixed to the rear fork.
 
#15
Your other alternative is using a heavy duty rack of your choice in conjunction with an axle made by The Robert Axle Project that is used in support of a Bob Trailer. Here is the axle they advised me to use for the OMM Phat Sherpa Rear Rack: https://robertaxleproject.com/shop/12x197-1-75-mm-thread-for-bob-trailer/

Those bright stainless end pieces are what that's going to allow you to attach the rack down legs/and or their supports onto the rear axle. The stainless end pieces are threaded onto the axle itself; on the outside, female threads accept the rack mounting screws.

Robert Axle is very receptive to questions; I got an answer back in just several hours on which axle I needed to complete my rear rack installation. It appears they do make a bob trailer compatible rear axle for your smaller width axle, but best to call them and confirm exactly what you would need.

As for the top stays, you'd have to fabricate some aluminum bars to attach onto the rear triangle top half in the way it does for the OMM rack that Clyde showed you. That way, the rack pivots with the axle & triangle.

Attachment points to the triangle would be done using aircraft clamps which can be found online most anywhere.

Never will understand why so many mountain bikes today don't have threaded inserts to accept rear racks....