recommendations for an inexpensive repair stand

DDBB

Well-Known Member
If I had my bike on the stand a lot, I'd buy a quality stand. .Mine is used for light maintenance and is sufficient for that.. I didn't want to spend a fortune just so I can easily lube the chain and adjust the gears.
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Inexpensive stands suck. All of them. None were designed for 50-75 lb bikes. Ebike stands worth a turd are 2k. I have a park tools model 9 stand but lifting a 65 lb bike and getting itbinto the stand for and old fart means another helper. This is the year of the power lift.
I hear you! Lifting my heavy ebike onto a stand isn't an easy task. I've used the relatively inexpensive Park Tool PCS-10 for years with my conventional bikes. I discovered a fairly easy way to get my 68 pound Pedego Interceptor onto the PCS-10 without lifting the entire bike. Lift just the front wheel and leave the rear tire on the ground. Clamp one of the tubes and pivot the bike up into position. I posted these pics in an earlier thread :

P1060773a.jpg P1060774a.jpg P1060777a.jpg P1060778a.jpg

It can be tricky with a step through but fairly easy with a diamond frame bike.

That power lift looks really sweet but a bit out of my price range.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
I bought a $50 stand on ebay early in 2018. I do almost all my own maintenance and installation and really enjoy tinkering on my bike. The plastic parts on the stand started breaking almost right away. My bike weighs around 60 pounds after I remove the batttery, lock, bags, etc. Being a step through, I have to clamp it on the seat post. Thus it is not balanced on the stand. The geared plastic part that holds the bike when you are tilting it forward or back broke almost immediately. I had to make it barely serviceable using a wire wrap. The tripod is not really wide enough to hold the large frame bike in a stable manner. I have to hold the bike with one hand and wrench with the other. It was an exercise in frustration.

I finally broke down and bought the Park Tool PC 4-2 Wow what a vast improvement, It is safer to work on, much more stable and clearly built to last. You really do get what you pay for. I should have bought the Park Tool stand in the first place instead of wasting my time and money on a plastic POS.

So my recommendation about an inexpensive repair stand is, if you can possibly afford a good one, bite the bullet and buy it. Don't buy an inexpensive one.

PCS-4-2_001.jpg
 
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I agree, a well built (and expensive) purpose built stand can't be beat. But I am cheap, so will probably go the DIY route. Making it out of gas pipe should be plenty strong, and I don't have to have all the bells and whistles like having it rotate and stuff.

I'm an old fart too, and it's true that it's no fun hefting a heavy e-bike. Mine has a hub motor, and the battery is quick release w/ a key lock, so removing the battery and rear wheel assy only takes about 10 minutes and makes for a much lighter bike.

FWIW, 95% of my bike work can be done w/ the bike simply turned upside down on the floor. I lock the rear brake and pull up on the handlebars and rotate it over onto it's topside. That is much easier than trying to lift the whole bike from the side. It balances well on the handlebars and rear basket, and it's easy to take some 2x4 scraps and slide under things to make it stable. My kitchen chairs have casters on the bottom like a computer chair, and it's comfortable to sit in one and roll around to the different parts of the bike and work on it.
 

thatdude902

Active Member
I just went with a DIY stand with some 2x4s and a couple of 3D printed parts. It's simple and stores out of the way. For basic maintenance, it's good enough. The only issue might be if I had to take off both wheels, in which case, I would need to find a way to keep the balance (like tie one end to the ceiling.

IMG_20181104_100256.jpgIMG_20181104_100428.jpg

I used to do all my bike maintenance on a bike trainer, but the ebike is just too big to fit the trainer.
 

Thomas Jaszewski

Well-Known Member
When I owned my Vespa GTS I bought a $1000 hydraulic lift. It was life changing when it came to wrenching. I sell stuff and don't repair bikes for others, but we're thinking of opening the garage, more than 1200 sq ft, to bike kit builders. I just need to sort the best price. $1800 is the best I can find after a short, 20 min, search. I can no longer load a bike on simple stands. With my Vespa stand I recovered 80% of the purchase price. A consideration I always explore. what is the value, used?
 

bob armani

Well-Known Member
Next, tired of struggling. If I can manage a dealer discount of at least 25%, ammin!
ITEM # PRS-33
/ REPAIR STANDS / SHOPPOWER LIFT SHOP STAND
Now that is what many of us need, however, a little pricey for the average E-biker. Another option is bolt a Power Hoist onto the garage rafters and use the wired remote to lift your bike. Looks like it would work with a little tweaking IMO. Save your backs guys!:D
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
Although I am happy with my Park Tool Pc 4-2 This Ez lift counterbalanced stand made Efficient Velo Tools in Portland Oregon is on my wish list https://www.efficientvelo.com/shop/ez-lift-repair-stand. Our local shop in Bellingham just bought one and put my bike on it yesterday to change tires. The base is twice the thickness of the Park tool pro base. It is just plain awsome. Slide the clamp down the pole to bike ground level, clamp it on and raise it up. There is a weight inside the pipe that make lifting the clamped on bike smooth and easy. Expensive as hell but half the price of a power lift and built to last in the USA.

 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Although I am happy with my Park Tool Pc 4-2 This Ez lift counterbalanced stand made Efficient Velo Tools in Portland Oregon is on my wish list https://www.efficientvelo.com/shop/ez-lift-repair-stand. Our local shop in Bellingham just bought one and put my bike on it yesterday to change tires. The base is twice the thickness of the Park tool pro base. It is just plain awsome. Slide the clamp down the pole to bike ground level, clamp it on and raise it up. There is a weight inside the pipe that make lifting the clamped on bike smooth and easy. Expensive as hell but half the price of a power lift and built to last in the USA.

This would definitely be worth looking into if I had a dedicated space to work on my bikes. Until I build a bigger garage, I'm going to have to settle for a portable model.
 

Feliz

Well-Known Member
I just used my Xtools stand I purchased from Chainreaction cycles in the UK and it worked great for setting up my latest purchase of a fat tire ebike weighing nearly 70 pounds. I'm glad I had it as the gears where way out of adjustment, it was better quality than I expected especialy considering the $50 price and free shipping. This workstand is sold under several brands mostly in Europe. Recommended
 

BrianMura

Active Member
I just went with a DIY stand with some 2x4s and a couple of 3D printed parts. It's simple and stores out of the way. For basic maintenance, it's good enough. The only issue might be if I had to take off both wheels, in which case, I would need to find a way to keep the balance (like tie one end to the ceiling.

View attachment 28588View attachment 28589

I used to do all my bike maintenance on a bike trainer, but the ebike is just too big to fit the trainer.
@thatdude902 Do you know where I could find the STL file for the 3D printed parts? I'd like to try making one of these stands. Very economic and portable!
 

thatdude902

Active Member
Oh sorry I didn't see that someone had asked about the 3D printed parts. I designed those, they were pretty simple, design wise. The cutouts are there because of the magnetic sensor on the Rad Rover. Anyway, here is the part: Thingiverse.