Ride1up range per battery charge

AlanC

New Member
I bought a Ride1up bike about 3 weeks ago, and I am having an issue that I would like to see if others have experienced also. The range of the battery is important to me. The range for this battery is 25-50 miles per charge. After my first charge I barely squeaked out 20 miles riding mostly at Level 7 (out of 9 levels) and just a couple of moderate hills. I emailed Kevin, the owner, and asked if I had received a good battery. His response is that that mileage sounded normal for the conditions and that maybe check the psi on the tires and it may take a few cycles to get the battery "up to speed". The psi was low so I filled the tires. I have charged the battery six times hoping that a few cycles would improve the mileage. Once I got 21 miles before the battery cut out, but it is usually 20 miles per charge. If 20 miles is the standard for normal usage, then why is the low end not rated at 20? I ride about 12 miles a day, so the difference between 20 and 25 miles is the difference between charging once every two days and having to charge it every day. That is significant. Is any other Ride1up owners getting only 20 miles per charge? How on earth could a person get 50 miles out of a single charge? (BTW, I have been riding electric bikes for over 3 1/2 years and have had experience with about 6 different ebikes, so I am not a newbie to ebikes).
 

ebikemom

Administrator
Staff member
Ride1up is a small company, I believe (You can ask Kevin how many bikes they have sold), so you may not hear from many folks by asking here. Do they have a social media page for owners where you may find more folks who own one of their bikes to connect with? What does the owner mean about "normal for conditions?" This may mean that the estimate is, perhaps, based on flat terrain, and an unloaded bike, with a smaller rider? Perhaps he can provide more information?
 

rcdanner

Member
I have ridden my Ride1Up City for about 2 weeks. I ride everyday about 28miles in hills with over 1500ft elevation gain at PAS 5 level the entire route. Well, sometimes I cheat the last couple of miles and kick it up to 7 in a hurry to get home. I originally charged to 100% for the first week. I got home with no less than two bars. Sometimes it would volt rebound at home to three bars. The second week I charged only to 80% with my Luna Advanced charger. I always returned home with at least one bar which quickly bounced back to two. The bar count was verified on the battery also. The last two rides were with a new spare battery charged to 100% before each of those two rides. The same result. Two bars bouncing back to three after a few minutes in the garage. I use 65 lbs in the tires at all times. I am more than pleased with this stock 10.4Ah battery by Reention. I like this ebike very much. Very comfortable full upright position. Wind in the face. But who cares...the powerful 500 watt Motor takes it in stride. Good quality components. Not top end stuff but good enough. Customer service is the best. I’m sure Kevin will solve your problem. Period!
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Alan, there's no magic required here, just an understanding that going fast (or using higher PAS levels), uses more power than going slower (or riding at lower PAS levels).

It really is that simple. If you want to increase your range, peddle harder or slow down.

Maybe just use the higher PAS levels when you need to, as in climbing a hill, then lower back down once the hill is crested?
 

Mike's E-Bikes

Well-Known Member
I bought a Ride1up bike about 3 weeks ago, and I am having an issue that I would like to see if others have experienced also. The range of the battery is important to me. The range for this battery is 25-50 miles per charge. After my first charge I barely squeaked out 20 miles riding mostly at Level 7 (out of 9 levels) and just a couple of moderate hills. I emailed Kevin, the owner, and asked if I had received a good battery. His response is that that mileage sounded normal for the conditions and that maybe check the psi on the tires and it may take a few cycles to get the battery "up to speed". The psi was low so I filled the tires. I have charged the battery six times hoping that a few cycles would improve the mileage. Once I got 21 miles before the battery cut out, but it is usually 20 miles per charge. If 20 miles is the standard for normal usage, then why is the low end not rated at 20? I ride about 12 miles a day, so the difference between 20 and 25 miles is the difference between charging once every two days and having to charge it every day. That is significant. Is any other Ride1up owners getting only 20 miles per charge? How on earth could a person get 50 miles out of a single charge? (BTW, I have been riding electric bikes for over 3 1/2 years and have had experience with about 6 different ebikes, so I am not a newbie to ebikes).
If you have the 48 Volt, 10 amp hour battery, and are riding using level 7 out of 9, it sounds like you are probably going at a speed of at least over 20 mph. (probably 23 to 25 if you are in gear 7). If its a 500 watt motor, then a range of 20 to 21 miles at that level of assist, is actually about normal. To get to maybe close to a 40 mile range, you'd need to be in Level 1, or MAYBE Level 2 assist, and likely only traveling at speeds of between 10 and 12 mph. On mostly flat terrain (i.e. no hills or very small ones). That is the only way you will get longer range. Wind resistance alone, really increases once you are doing 15 mph, and much worse at 20 mph. The wind resistance curve is not linear as speed increases, and generally increases at a higher rate of change once you get around 15 mph and higher. Also unless you are REALLY strong and in very good shape, the energy your legs provide is probably only doing a third of the work, once you are over 20 mph, and in Level 7. The Ride1Up has a cadence sensor, so that motor is drawing a lot of watts out of the battery when you are on level 7, because that type of controller and display, (bafang) are speed range based levels. Lastly, on the bafang display, there is almost no difference in the power drawn once you get above level 5. Its almost flat or barely any increase of power or speed after Level 5. Sort of joke, but you see this all the time on their aftermarket kits and displays that have capability of 9 levels. Usually I just change them back to being only Levels 1 through 5. (can be done in the second level menu).

10 amp hour capacity, and 48 volts, with a 500 watt motor, seems like a 'stretch' to make 50 miles, especially with cadence sensing, so they are really pushing the 'truth' envelope on that one. It could possibly be done if you had torque sensing, like what existed on the Surface 604 Rook and Colt, that have a 48 Volt battery, 10 AH, and 500 watt motor. But again, stay in level 1 only, keep your speed down, and do some of your 'own work' to make it that far, keep tire pressure at the max, and maybe your range will be longer. Another variable is rider weight. If you are like a Court, and 135 lbs when in sopping wet clothes, maybe you can make that range. If you are 200 lbs, doubt it very much.
 

Mike's E-Bikes

Well-Known Member
Their website states:
The range is affected by a variety of factors; wind, surface, rider weight, tire pressure, bike tuning, surface grade, and by the amount of pedal assist. If you are 170lb rider using only the throttle without pedaling on a smooth surface with no headwind, you can expect a range of 30 miles, pedal assist high - 30 miles, pedal assist low - 60 miles.

Very flat and smooth surface. Check.
No head wind. Check.
Pedal level, low assist (Level 1). Check
Rider weight 170lb. Check.
Tire Pressure. (put at max). Check.

60 miles ? LOL ! (Not.) (20 mph wind to your back ?. Then maybe.)

40 miles. (Maybe, and would be reasonable to state that.)
 

Mike's E-Bikes

Well-Known Member
The LG 2600 mah cells they are using, is sort of low density. And potentially worse, the quality tends to vary more with LG (than Samsung or Panasonic), so larger voltage variances between cells can occur, (and still be within "spec") to short change you on overall true capacity, even when new. That doesn't account really that much for your situation, but be aware that does exist. They are definitely less expensive cells (than Samsung or Panasonic) for a reason. Hence the lower price point on this ebike. (i.e. they are selling this 10.4 ah battery for only $299. A typical Samsung 48 Volt 11 Amphour battery sells for $499 from other quality ebike OEM's - and even more if its Panasonic.) All battery's are not created equal. So the AH rating is not always going to tell you the whole story.
 
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AlanC

New Member
Thanks everyone for your replies. For those educating me on the principles of battery consumption, while I am not an electrical engineer or anything, I have ridden about 12,000 miles on electric bikes over the past 3 and 1/2 years. My questions are not so much about the basics of battery consumption, but rather how to achieve at least the minimum range on a given bike (Ride1up). I have ridden about 6 or 7 different ebikes during this time period, and this is the only one where I have not been able to reach the minimum range that is projected for this bike. Thanks, RCDanner, for your response. I was actually looking for the experience of other Ride1up users, and your info was really helpful. I do appreciate everyone's two cents.
Any other Ride1up users who can share their experience?
 

AlanC

New Member
Update: Yesterday and today I really consciously applied everything I know about conserving battery power and test-rode my bike. I kept it (for the most part) at level 5. On the console display, I found a setting that says how much power is being consumed at any given moment, so that was useful. I could really see that by pedaling much harder, the power usage went way down. I got 26 miles with a couple of bars still showing. At that point I was satisfied with the results, so I stopped my testing. If I can get 25-30 miles per charge, I am happy.
One more observation - using level 1 or 2 feels like no electricity at all, so it just seems counter-productive to pedal at that level just to extend the battery. At that point I would rather just ride a lighter non-electric bike....
Thanks again for all the replies,
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
I think you do need to pay attention to get max range. Watching/monitoring your power usage frequently can modify your riding style just enough to make a difference - so you're riding efficiently without all the focus.

Regarding the amount of power you add personally, gear usage is key as well.....
 

AZOldTech

Active Member
I bought a Ride1up bike about 3 weeks ago, and I am having an issue that I would like to see if others have experienced also. The range of the battery is important to me. The range for this battery is 25-50 miles per charge. After my first charge I barely squeaked out 20 miles riding mostly at Level 7 (out of 9 levels) and just a couple of moderate hills. I emailed Kevin, the owner, and asked if I had received a good battery. His response is that that mileage sounded normal for the conditions and that maybe check the psi on the tires and it may take a few cycles to get the battery "up to speed". The psi was low so I filled the tires. I have charged the battery six times hoping that a few cycles would improve the mileage. Once I got 21 miles before the battery cut out, but it is usually 20 miles per charge. If 20 miles is the standard for normal usage, then why is the low end not rated at 20? I ride about 12 miles a day, so the difference between 20 and 25 miles is the difference between charging once every two days and having to charge it every day. That is significant. Is any other Ride1up owners getting only 20 miles per charge? How on earth could a person get 50 miles out of a single charge? (BTW, I have been riding electric bikes for over 3 1/2 years and have had experience with about 6 different ebikes, so I am not a newbie to ebikes).
The conditions you ride will change the range of your ebike. I'm a 200lb 6'2" guy and ride in a flat paved area, half way going and the exact reverse half way back, at assist level 7-9, and I get about 30miles out of a fully charged battery. However if you have hills to climb or in a windy area, this is where you would lose a good amount of juice. Overcoming wind resistance as well as climbing hills could easily lower your pack range from my 30 miles. In order to get a higher range you will need to lower your speed/assist level. I haven't tried it, because I find 30 miles to be a good range for what I want, but I think I could probably get 35-40miles if I lower the assist level to 2-4 with the lower speed. But as I said my area is flat.

Also you did not say which Ride1up you have. If you have the mtb tire version, changing the tires to a better rolling resistance tires will also help. Especially if you ride your ebike in paved areas. I'm riding the mtb version and my 30mile range is with better rolling resistance tires (27.5"x2.00" Schwalbe Big Ben Plus GreenGuard), NOT the standard MTB ones.
https://www.amazon.com/Schwalbe-Plus-26x2-15-Wire-GreenGuard/dp/B01M8NO0IZ/
 
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AZOldTech

Active Member
BTW, here is a great article of testing the different 3500mA cells out there of Sanyo vs Panasonic vs LG vs Samsung. LG does not fair well and ends up dead last...
3500mAh cells tested: Sanyo vs Panasonic vs LG vs Samsung
https://secondlifestorage.com/t-3500mAh-cells-tested-Sanyo-vs-Panasonic-vs-LG-vs-Samsung

IMO, buying a genuine Samsung cell battery pack is the best value for the money, as those are better quality (for the price) and can be purchased for 48V 10.4Ah, 13Ah, 14.5Ah, 15Ah, 16Ah, 17.5Ah, 21Ah and can give you a higher range up to twice as much. Of course the battery price goes up with the more Ah you want.
 
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The duke

Active Member
Update: Yesterday and today I really consciously applied everything I know about conserving battery power and test-rode my bike. I kept it (for the most part) at level 5. On the console display, I found a setting that says how much power is being consumed at any given moment, so that was useful. I could really see that by pedaling much harder, the power usage went way down. I got 26 miles with a couple of bars still showing. At that point I was satisfied with the results, so I stopped my testing. If I can get 25-30 miles per charge, I am happy.
One more observation - using level 1 or 2 feels like no electricity at all, so it just seems counter-productive to pedal at that level just to extend the battery. At that point I would rather just ride a lighter non-electric bike....
Thanks again for all the replies,
Hi AlanC. Count yourself lucky. I have a brand new EasyMotion BH Atom X. Stats on their website promise "get there and back" power from a 700Wh battery that they rate at "up to" 90 miles of range. I'm averaging 6 MILES OF RANGE on level 3 of 4, doing moderately hilly street riding. ???? I weigh 200lbs and the weather in the 2 months I've had the bike has been a consistent 70 degrees. "Your results may vary" is a key phrase.
20190619_104355.jpg
 

Mike's E-Bikes

Well-Known Member
Update: Yesterday and today I really consciously applied everything I know about conserving battery power and test-rode my bike. I kept it (for the most part) at level 5. On the console display, I found a setting that says how much power is being consumed at any given moment, so that was useful. I could really see that by pedaling much harder, the power usage went way down. I got 26 miles with a couple of bars still showing. At that point I was satisfied with the results, so I stopped my testing. If I can get 25-30 miles per charge, I am happy.
One more observation - using level 1 or 2 feels like no electricity at all, so it just seems counter-productive to pedal at that level just to extend the battery. At that point I would rather just ride a lighter non-electric bike....
Thanks again for all the replies,
Seriously ? No electric at all in level 1 or 2 ?

That's totally the opposite of what occurs on the Aventon Pace 500. With the 500, Plenty of assist on Level 1. Many riders say Level 1 is probably all they will ever need. I mention this as a lot people perceive or commented here on EBR that Ride1up is the 'same' as a Pace 500. Based on performance alone, nothing could be further from the truth. Range is also much longer as well.
 

AZOldTech

Active Member
Seriously ? No electric at all in level 1 or 2 ?

That's totally the opposite of what occurs on the Aventon Pace 500. With the 500, Plenty of assist on Level 1. Many riders say Level 1 is probably all they will ever need. I mention this as a lot people perceive or commented here on EBR that Ride1up is the 'same' as a Pace 500. Based on performance alone, nothing could be further from the truth. Range is also much longer as well.
Of course there is assist at level 1 or 2. Ride1up and the Pace 500 have a very similar feel.
 

rcdanner

Member
Ive ridden both and no they don't. He is right about how weak the R1Up is.
I have both Ride1Up City and the Aventon StepThru Pace 500. I think they both have the same 500 watt power. They seem to ride about the same. The real difference I feel is Pace throttle and assist need at least one full pedal revolution before motor engages. Also the minimum speed on PAS 1 is about 11-12mph. This 'high speed' takes some getting used to. Particularly when turning. Ride1Up throttle engages from 0 start but the PAS needs one pedal revolution before motor engages. Also the minimum speed of Ride1Up in PAS 1 is a leisurely 6mph. The above comment I am sure refers to the lower AmpHour rating of 10.4 vs Pace 500 11.6Ah rating. So far, I am quite pleased with the range I am getting on Ride1Up during my 28mile daily ride of 1500ft elevation gain in Tucson Mountain riding. 80% charge gets me home with 2bars remaining. I will be doing the Tucson bicycle loop of 57 level miles in the next few days. I expect the Ride1Up with 100% full charge will make the loop. Or I'll be pedalling it all by myself home.
 

Mike's E-Bikes

Well-Known Member
I have both Ride1Up City and the Aventon StepThru Pace 500. I think they both have the same 500 watt power. They seem to ride about the same. The real difference I feel is Pace throttle and assist need at least one full pedal revolution before motor engages. Also the minimum speed on PAS 1 is about 11-12mph. This 'high speed' takes some getting used to. Particularly when turning. Ride1Up throttle engages from 0 start but the PAS needs one pedal revolution before motor engages. Also the minimum speed of Ride1Up in PAS 1 is a leisurely 6mph. The above comment I am sure refers to the lower AmpHour rating of 10.4 vs Pace 500 11.6Ah rating. So far, I am quite pleased with the range I am getting on Ride1Up during my 28mile daily ride of 1500ft elevation gain in Tucson Mountain riding. 80% charge gets me home with 2bars remaining. I will be doing the Tucson bicycle loop of 57 level miles in the next few days. I expect the Ride1Up with 100% full charge will make the loop. Or I'll be pedalling it all by myself home.
True - the R1up has slower level 1 and 2, but that is due to lower torque. It just cannot accelerate as fast. The difference is on hills where the Pace stands out. By the way, you can control the top speed in level 1, by adjusting pedal cadence, by choosing the right gear. Amphour rating has nothing to do with speed and is the capacity of the battery determining range.
 

Mike's E-Bikes

Well-Known Member
The R1Up is private label of Motorlife ebike. You can find it on Alibaba, and get it for around $650 as a sample. You'd have to pay import and customs fees which would put the price at or above what R1Up charges. But they are buying container loads.

Whereas, Aventon owns its factory , has full control of design, engineering, and quality control. Big difference in not only how the two are made, but how they are supported, supply chain management, and financial health.

R1up is strictly an importer like an M2S.

Literally anyone could put up a website, do preorders like R1up, or M2S both have, with not much capital at risk and few employees. They can shut down or go out of business in the blink of an eye. For instance if warranty claims get too frequent or costly and the supplier chooses to not fully support. Worse an importer like this has little legal recourse if something really goes South.

To save maybe $100 or $150 vs a pace 500, seems to have an incredible amount of hidden risks beyond just the bike itself. Aventon as a company has established a healthy regular bike business in some distinct niches having many faithful shops and loyal ones who love their outstanding response times and support. It's rare to see it these days, and no one else out of about 2 dozen vendors I deal with comes close. They bend over backwards, don't give you red tape or a dismissive attitude when problems arise (which are comparatively few).

Speaks volumes about their management and leadership. Integrity is second to none.