Ride1up range per battery charge

AZOldTech

Active Member
Ive ridden both and no they don't. He is right about how weak the R1Up is.
And I've ridden both too and I say they are similar on assist levels, with the Ride1up plenty strong given its own limitation of 25mph max speed versus the 28mph for the Pace. And they both produce that speed from similar 500W motors. The difference is 12% in top speed between the two and maybe that is what is the difference you "feel". Remember that the Ride1up used to be $999 when I bought it (and included the LCD display) while now is $1200 and no LCD (vs the Pace which has stayed $1400). So the price difference used to be 30% more for 12% more speed while now is 16% more for 12% more speed (and you also get hydraulic brakes and LCD display versus +$55 for LCD on the Ride1up). So IMO given these current prices, the Aventon Pace 500 is clearly the better buy now.
 
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AZOldTech

Active Member
Mike, You are absolutely right about acceleration and power. The Aventon 500 is quite a bit stronger than the Ride1Up City. Tested both on the same hill. Aventon at PAS 5 went up at 28-29mph with strong pedalling. The Ride1Up at PAS 9 could only manage 21mph with similar pedalling effort. On full throttle the 500 hit a little over 20mph while Ride1Up managed 17-18mph. I imagine with better tires (higher pressure less rolling resistance) the 500 could even do better with less pedalling.
There is a difference on top speed with the Ride1up, or any ebike for that matter, with a fully charge battery (90-100%). I have no problem hitting 25mph on throttle alone or PAS 9 (its max speed) even when riding heels IF the battery is fully charged. The top speed drops once the charge goes below 85%. But then again that's true on the different ebikes that I've tried. Having said that the Avanton Pace 500 has a bigger battery 10.4 vs 11.6 which should last longer with a top speed of 28mph. So given the current prices of both the Aventon 500 is the better buy with its hydraulic brakes and included LCD display vs +$55 extra for the LCD display on the Ride1up. When I bought my Ride1up it was $999 and included the LCD display. BTW, I'm happy with the Ride1up, its built, speed (25mph) and range (30 miles). If the prices were the same as back when I bought it ($999 w/LCD), I would buy it again. But given the huge increase in price (+20% and no LCD), if I wanted an ebike now, I would go for the Pace 500.
 
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AZOldTech

Active Member
I kind of wish I had read these posts before I bought the Ride1up. So far it fits my purposes - hopefully the company will be around for a while.
Even though I like the Pace 500 very much, and I do recommend it, you need to be aware of couple of things. First, unlike the Ride1up, the Pace 500 comes with a rigid fork so your ride will feel every bump of the road. So you will either have to purchase a suspension fork or a suspension seatpost or both if you want a more cushioned ride. Also it comes with 15 degree sweptback handlebar that I'm not a fan of but you may not have a problem with. Also the throttle does not work like you would think (which is very weird as I've never seen an ebike throttle work that way before) as you have to give it a few pedal strokes for it to kick in, and it is limited to 20mph (pedelec on the other hand is 28mph). Also this is a cadence sensor only ebike (just like the Ride1up), as I think someone mentioned incorrectly that it also has a torque sensor (it does not). See court explaining it at 2:45 as well as the throttle. I'm also including a 2nd review that mentions some other issues that the reviewer experienced. But in general, the Pace 500 is a great ebike for the money and even with its quirks I do recommend it over the Ride1up after its +20% price increase. However if I had it I would have changed the fork and the handlebar and try to find a way to reprogram that weird throttle to work up to 28mph (instead of 20mph) and without the need to pedal to engage it.
 
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However if I had it I would ... try to find a way to reprogram that weird throttle to work up to 28mph (instead of 20mph) and without the need to pedal to engage it.
The US Class III standard is for pedal assist up to 28mph and throttle (if one is available) up to 20mph. That is probably why it behaves this way. If the throttle assisted the speed beyond 20mph it wouldn't be a class III bike.
 

AZOldTech

Active Member
The US Class III standard is for pedal assist up to 28mph and throttle (if one is available) up to 20mph. That is probably why it behaves this way. If the throttle assisted the speed beyond 20mph it wouldn't be a class III bike.
The weirdness that I'm referring to is the need to pedal to engage it, and that is not a Class III anything. And I'm sure that both the speed as well as the need to pedal are software controlled and so should be changeable. BTW, the Ride1up throttle works without a speed limit (pedelec or throttle makes no difference on speed limit to 25mph) and without the need to pedal to engage it. And IMO, that is the right way to do a throttle.
 

AZOldTech

Active Member
...hopefully the company will be around for a while.
There is nothing proprietary on the Ride1up, even if the company is no more (unlike buying any of these other expensive custom frame/battery made ebikes). You can buy everything off the shelf to replace if something stops working past the 1 year warranty period. And in many ways you can improve the ride1up if you do. Upgrade the standard 48V Reention Dorado battery with up to 21Ah DOUBLE your current battery capacity. Upgrade - your gearing and breaking are Shimano and Tektro and can be replaced with same or even better Shimano/Tektro components, even hydraulic brakes. The motor is a 500W Bafang motor that is readily available off the self, and the standard 48V Lishui controller can be replaced with same or with 48V Bafang controller which also gives you access to a myriad of Bafang LCD displays with more information and other features. The point is that everything can be replaced on the ebike without the need for the company to be around. That is another reason why I chose the Ride1up, use of easily replaceable standard components, on top of good quality for the price when I bought it.

BTW, I have upgraded my Ride1up with integrated rear light, better rolling resistance tires, rack, fenders and gearing (front and back) with minimal cost (about $60 for front & back gearing, $45 for the tires and about $95 for rack, bag, fenders and rear integrated light).
https://electricbikereview.com/forum/threads/integrated-brake-light.25988/#post-179317
 
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AZOldTech

Active Member
The US Class III standard is for pedal assist up to 28mph and throttle (if one is available) up to 20mph. That is probably why it behaves this way. If the throttle assisted the speed beyond 20mph it wouldn't be a class III bike.
BTW, I found this from Bosch's page which states that class 3 ebikes are NOT supposed to have throttle: https://electricbikereview.com/forum/threads/another-twist-to-throttle-vs-pas-ebikes-comments-wanted.28435/page-2#post-201223
Of course IF this regulation was to become state or federally mandated (meaning all 50 states), you just disconnect the higo connector and remove the throttle from the Ride1up/Pace 500 (or whatever ebike >20mph you have) and the throttle is gone, so no big deal.
 
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BTW, I found this from Bosch's page which states that class 3 ebikes are NOT supposed to have throttle: https://electricbikereview.com/forum/threads/another-twist-to-throttle-vs-pas-ebikes-comments-wanted.28435/page-2#post-201223
I had thought that most legislation allowed throttles up to 20mph for class 3 bikes, a sort of class 2+3. But, looking into it some more it appears that I am wrong. Legal definitions of class 3 don't seem to include throttle to any speed. For example, California defines it in section 312.5 as follows: A “class 3 electric bicycle,” or “speed pedal-assisted electric bicycle,” is a bicycle equipped with a motor that provides assistance only when the rider is pedaling, and that ceases to provide assistance when the bicycle reaches the speed of 28 miles per hour, and equipped with a speedometer (from https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billNavClient.xhtml?bill_id=201520160AB1096)
 

AZOldTech

Active Member
FWIW Ride1up now has a 17.5Ah battery for the 500 for $449
 

1littlekim

New Member
The R1Up is private label of Motorlife ebike. You can find it on Alibaba, and get it for around $650 as a sample. You'd have to pay import and customs fees which would put the price at or above what R1Up charges. But they are buying container loads.

Whereas, Aventon owns its factory , has full control of design, engineering, and quality control. Big difference in not only how the two are made, but how they are supported, supply chain management, and financial health.

R1up is strictly an importer like an M2S.

Literally anyone could put up a website, do preorders like R1up, or M2S both have, with not much capital at risk and few employees. They can shut down or go out of business in the blink of an eye. For instance if warranty claims get too frequent or costly and the supplier chooses to not fully support. Worse an importer like this has little legal recourse if something really goes South.

To save maybe $100 or $150 vs a pace 500, seems to have an incredible amount of hidden risks beyond just the bike itself. Aventon as a company has established a healthy regular bike business in some distinct niches having many faithful shops and loyal ones who love their outstanding response times and support. It's rare to see it these days, and no one else out of about 2 dozen vendors I deal with comes close. They bend over backwards, don't give you red tape or a dismissive attitude when problems arise (which are comparatively few).

Speaks volumes about their management and leadership. Integrity is second to none.
I know I am late to the game, but your post would carry much more weight had you included a link to the site on Alibaba. In addition, your posts comes across as promoting Aventon which you carry in your store for your profit. I appreciate your taking the time to help us less informed, but I know you as well as I know Kevin.... except he has answered some tough email questions regarding his product.
 

1littlekim

New Member
Mike relentlessly shills for the bikes he carries, esp. the Surface604 Shred and Aventons. He trashes every other brand. He's an embarrassment to the industry, really. He's like a broken record, just repeating his hateful rants against brand competitors over and over again. I can't even imagine what it would be like dealing with him when the inevitable warranty issue/s pop up with these bikes.

As far as the Aventon, these bikes are severely under-engineered. They kick like a mule on the lowest level of assist. They're impossible to ride slowly. I like to ride fast, but I also like to be able to control my speed. The only way to ride slowly on the aventon is to turn the pedals a quarter revolution, let the bike lurch forward, slow down, ease off the pedals, then tap the pedals again for another big kick of power, etc. It is an awful ride experience.

Not to mention, the swept back bars are horrible for handling. Any time you want to steer, the aventon just yells back: "NO!" The bike doesn't want to do anything besides plow forward in a straight line.

The Aventon would hypothetically be fun to ride on a completely empty track in a straight line only. But if you want to ride it in the real world, which requires modulating your pace, cornering, navigating through city traffic, it is downright awful.

Which is too bad. I've met quite a few of their staff reps and they are nice people. They're not bicycle enthusiasts: they're very young kids fresh out of college just looking for their first job, but they are well intentioned and have a good attitude overall.

The Aventon was my first experience with cadence sensor bikes, and I just automatically assumed that any bike with a cadence sensor rode as badly as the aventon. Fortunately, I rode the rad rover later on and discovered bikes with cadence sensors can actually ride much like a normal bike, only with significantly more horsepower.
Thank You for the response. Even after I posted this my research led me to other threads, and this practice was much more evident. I thank you for validating it and adding your own individual response leading to a bike not even in the conversation. That is all anyone should want; open, honest, and transparent discussion. It seems as though EBR forums would catch on to it or create a forum for *newbies* which was monitored closely for such tactics by people who could profit for them. Maybe I just presumed wrong thinking this was community vs business...
 

Mike's E-Bikes

Well-Known Member
I'm with you littlekim. Nice to know somebody else is picking up on his borderline honesty and speaking up about it. Mike and I have battled verbally here on several occasions, as I felt he was either misrepresenting the topic at hand, or providing just one side of the story as absolute truth, presenting rookies (those that don't already know Mike is a self promoting dealer) with bad info. purposely.

That said, he does provide interesting industry info on occasion.
Keep up the defamation Al. I have never once provided bad or misleading information. Just because I am a dealer doesn't mean I can't post here. I've compared and tried over 100 ebikes over the past 5 years. I've had many of the on line brands come into my shop for repairs bc people are desperate since no one else will repair them, and they couldn't trouble shoot or fix on their own. The misleading info on here comes from a lot of people who are too gutless to even post their real names, and they shill for their particular one or two ebikes they ride, only after very brief test rides. And gutless cowards like eMTBdude who has no real countering points, but just attacks the person and the post. Some of you also post at a very high rate and seemingly have to weigh in on every little topic. 3000 posts is absurd. So it's not surprising to see you weigh once again. For the record I receive a lot of private emails and posts thanking me for the information I provide, and people encouraging me to keep people like you honest and straight. And yes there are a couple brands I like , but carry more than a dozen, and have compared them side by side with some of these others, and there is just no comparison. I take the ebikes apart, including motors, and I do a lot conversions as well, so I'm constantly evaluating and testing all kinds of parts.

I'm a mechanical engineer with significant industrial and commercial energy technology experience and have worked on production floors. Also have been in sales of technology equipment involving power technology and motors. I'm not just some bike shop owner who just happened to get in the industry and enjoys bikes. I got into the industry with a very specific purpose and it was after years of following a number of concurrent technology developments, not just limited to batteries but also transportation and distributed power. I've been tracking and trying out ebikes since 1999, so I'm not the newbie some people may speculate on.

After seeing so many technically shallow reviews by people who get worshipped who have no technology experience at all, I am going to be doing side by side ebike reviews and allow people to understand why I chose the brands I carry, and compare them to these other on line only brands that people elevate far more than they should, while getting suckered into a lot of marketing hype. As an owner I also do repairs, all of them,and all troubleshooting. I'm going to do this for the entire time I remain in the business, and at some people teach new people how to troubleshoot,which I did for many years at industrial facilities. There are so many trades these days that lack training, and repair people are borderline incompetent in many industries where they deal with the consumer. It's not limited to just ebikes. You can pretty much assume that any HVAC guy or other appliance person who comes to your home does not know very much about repairs and that you will be ripped off. The number of scams in this industry and the lack of ethics is frightening and I'm going to do my small part to address that in my own shop, and my own geographic area, and occasionally on this forum, even if it results in ad hominem attacks like from this gutless troll emtbdude. Too much of a coward to share his identity and just hides behind his pc in obscurity making ridiculous rants, with no substance or knowledge at all of this business or the products other than what he might ride.
 

Mike's E-Bikes

Well-Known Member
I know I am late to the game, but your post would carry much more weight had you included a link to the site on Alibaba. In addition, your posts comes across as promoting Aventon which you carry in your store for your profit. I appreciate your taking the time to help us less informed, but I know you as well as I know Kevin.... except he has answered some tough email questions regarding his product.
See attached documents I got from motorlife. They actually reached out to me to carry the ebike that ride1up private labeled, back in 2017. I get these vendors contacting me all the time, that can be found on Alibaba. It's the same ebike as their 500 series. I could specify the 48volt if I wanted and larger battery, and different derailleur etc. They are selling this same ebike around the world to white labelers like Ride1up. There are dozens of these Chinese contractors with frames that they copy from each other . No engineering on their own. No specs on metals used or quality control. They just slap on components and sell someone their bikes. The pricing would be a lot lower than shown if bought in container loads. Customs is cheaper that way as is shipping, so unit costs even lower than shown in their attached invoice which was just for a sample of 3. This is also for AHicks. Who thinks I'm not honest and desires to use defamatory language.
 

Attachments

krdugger

Member
Hi guys, Guess I am late on this thread, and haven't been able to read every comment naturally. To the OP, if you want to add a lot more range, we offered owners only our 17.5ah battery for $329 and currently have it at only $349. I don't know anyone that offers this battery at this price. We try to take care of our customer. Let me know if you want one. You can email me and I can get you set up.
Regarding the aventon pace 500 vs ride1up 500 series; They are both good options as car replacements. To be perfectly honest, our bike costs more to manufacturer (but is currently selling for $200 less). I know their supplier (Chinese Factory as well as ours). They make great bikes also, I am not bad-mouthing anyone here. Their motor is actually a 500w shengyi motor with a different gearing setup offering higher top speeds but lower torque. We are actually changing to this same motor setup as it seems more desirable for most riders and is cheaper. Our current 500 series motor was the slightly more expensive bafang 500w.
@Mike's E-Bikes, most companies that aren't Trek/Specialized are operating on a similar basis. Partnered with a Chinese factory like Motorlife, enwe, etc etc. Juiced, Radrover, Aventon, Luna, etc. There isn't anything inherently wrong with this, but it not as simple as just slapping a logo on their models as I'm sure you would expect. I have a German couple over their running our QC operations. I also do a load of customization with frame geometry, components, features, etc. It's just the simple fact that the entire manufacturing process is tied to Chinese or Taiwanese factories. They want to grow as well and don't have the patience to wait for my business, or iGo, or Rambo, or M2S, or whoever that company is to grow large enough for their capacity; so naturally, they market to everyone they can. Buying a bike from them normally is more expensive and much more difficult then buying the same spec'd bike from our company (Ride1UP). Simply because the average person wouldn't have the means to fill all the roles that we have established to get a quality product delivered to your home. This could be a day long discussion no doubt, but it is a little concerning when you tout your industry experience (which I have no doubt about) but then state that these are just carelessly slapped together bikes from Chinese factories all copying another. Then in the next sentence you go on to speak about defamation. That isn't just hypocritical, it is quite hurtful to the thousands of hours of work we put into design, QC, engineering, etc. Our process is also quite similar to the hundreds of other bikes which you have mentioned and tested. Our business models, designs, and missions all differ a bit, but again, the process and supply chain is quite similar.
I'm sure this could be a long discussion and would be best in person.
On a separate note, I just found out today from Bafang's head of sales that the juiced's CCS is using a 500w motor but calling it a 750w motor. There is no doubt a large amount of misinformation in the new world of eBike starter companies, but I always attempt to be as transparent as possible. Of course we want our site to be as sales'y/promotional as possible, but I am a huge advocate of transparency.
 

Browneye

Active Member
Don't try to discharge a battery to any specific level - recharge it when you use it, 5 miles or 20. These are lithium-ion, no memory, very little self discharge, and not li-po so you won't blow it up. LOL

If you're going to store it more than a few days then run some juice out of it - ideally to 50%, but anything less than a full charge is fine. And keep at room temp - so bring it in from the garage if it's extra hot or cold.
 

Browneye

Active Member
Well, that went downhill fast. 🤣
Nice of Ride1Up to stop by - thank you. Wish you great success.

I test rode the Aventon Pace 500 and 350. Liked them a lot. The 500 was a little too abrupt, so actually liked the 350 a little better. But the component spec is a little nicer on the 500, and the optional bigger (17ah) battery. Yes, I would replace the bars first thing, with a flat or moderate rise standard bar.

I would have bought one, but after seeing how a hub-drive works I decided to convert the wife's bike with the same hub instead. What I find curious though are the various Bafang geared hub housing sizes - I got one that is 170mm in diameter while most of them you see for sale at various watt ratings are 158mm. The one I got is stamped with 48v 500w, it is the largest of them from Bafang. So far so good - it's very powerful, quiet, and easy to ride. Wife absolutely loves it, and I've test-ridden it enough to be completely satisfied with how it works.

On the heels of a $16B market - yes, that's billions - we can surely expect a lot of upstart distributors here in the US, with various business models. I say more power to them. I'm not really an entrepreneur, more of a problem solver and systems guy, and nearing retirement, but this or the cannabis industry are ripe for making BANK if you can find your market niche. 👍

All the back-biting and infighting is off-putting at a minimum, however. And I think the emtbdude guy has been kicked out.