Riese & Müller 2020, integrated battery trend continues..

elect

Member
I just saw this video:


unfortunately it's in german and for the most part they show the speaking guy. But they do show (shortly) some of the new incoming bike though..

I'm looking forward to the new motors (although it looks like they will have some anti-tuning protection system), however one thing I cant wrap my head around, is this trend of integrating the battery into the bike frame..

I see only one advantage, aesthetics, and many disadvantages, such as weight, no ventilation and longer time to take it out

Am I the only one?
 

Mr. Coffee

Well-Known Member
I see only one advantage, aesthetics, and many disadvantages, such as weight, no ventilation and longer time to take it out

Am I the only one?
No, and there are more disadvantages:
  • In-tube batteries are longer and skinnier and it is harder to carry extra batteries.
  • Proprietary form factors and design will likely limit future availability of replacement batteries.
  • That damned plastic cover that rattles all the time.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
I am with @elect and @Mr. Coffee on the use of power tube batteries. The only advantage I can see is aesthetic. Every practical factor is negative. At least the 2019 Homage that has a power tube plus an older power pack piggy back on the downtube which would allow one to bring along extra old style power packs for extended range. I'm sure the new motor is something to be desired but the new delight has no other appeal to me because of the batteries.
 

opimax

Well-Known Member
Anything towards stealth is worth it when you just want to ride and not be hassled. I have carried 2 extra Stromer batteries at almost all times, these are smaller. I go through a lot of Ortleib bags though.

The Delite, Fuelle, and maybe new Haibike Flyon are the 1st 3 choices when I can compare them in person or test...and possible service issues (local support). The Delite is the only dual suspension of the three (any other suggestions?)
 

Mr. Coffee

Well-Known Member
For myself I find all of this quite disappointing.

I probably am in the tiny minority here that use their R&M bike for long-distance touring. As it is the 2017 R&M Charger with dual batteries is still the bike to beat.

Going to integrated batteries makes the bike less practical for that application (largely because you can't put a power tube battery in a pannier).

They also don't seem to be addressing obvious and substantial issues with the racks and the brakes which keep it from being a dream e-bike touring machine.
 

elect

Member
I am with @elect and @Mr. Coffee on the use of power tube batteries. The only advantage I can see is aesthetic. Every practical factor is negative. At least the 2019 Homage that has a power tube plus an older power pack piggy back on the downtube which would allow one to bring along extra old style power packs for extended range. I'm sure the new motor is something to be desired but the new delight has no other appeal to me because of the batteries.
I saw the new integrated battery modules, 400 and 625 Wh.. any possibility of compatibility with previous bikes, like your, Alaskan?
 

Smultron

New Member
Powertube 400 is the same size as the 500 but it is NOT compatible with DualBattery. If using a single battery configuration the 400 will work like the 500.
The 600 is bigger by 67mm so it needs new frames.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
For myself I find all of this quite disappointing.

I probably am in the tiny minority here that use their R&M bike for long-distance touring. As it is the 2017 R&M Charger with dual batteries is still the bike to beat.

Going to integrated batteries makes the bike less practical for that application (largely because you can't put a power tube battery in a pannier).

They also don't seem to be addressing obvious and substantial issues with the racks and the brakes which keep it from being a dream e-bike touring machine.
I guess the up side in the changes that Riese & Mulller is making is that we remain happy with the bikes we have and are not pining for the latest and greatest.
 

tompat

Active Member
such as weight, no ventilation and longer time to take it out
there are more disadvantages:
  • In-tube batteries are longer and skinnier and it is harder to carry extra batteries.
  • Proprietary form factors and design will likely limit future availability of replacement batteries.
  • That damned plastic cover that rattles all the time.
  • Weight is about the same as frame batteries. About the same = these are not UCI Carbon fibre road bikes but heavy e-bikes..
  • Ventilation, never occured to me but yes in warm temperatures this would be a slight disadvantage, in cold temperatures the in-tubes are at an advantage since they are more protected and thus you get longer range in colder weather
  • Long time to take out, why take them out at all? Just use the charing port on the bike..
  • The in-tubes fit well into my Ortlieb pannier bags
  • Proprietary design already is a problem for all Bosch batteries regardless of form factor, there are none and has never been any third-party replacements for Bosch gear
  • What bike are you riding, the plastic covers on my Supercharger are dead silent

I probably am in the tiny minority here that use their R&M bike for long-distance touring.
Qurious as to what is "long distance" in your terms?
 

steve mercier

Well-Known Member
For myself I find all of this quite disappointing.

I probably am in the tiny minority here that use their R&M bike for long-distance touring. As it is the 2017 R&M Charger with dual batteries is still the bike to beat.

Going to integrated batteries makes the bike less practical for that application (largely because you can't put a power tube battery in a pannier).

They also don't seem to be addressing obvious and substantial issues with the racks and the brakes which keep it from being a dream e-bike touring machine.
I carry three batteries most tours now. The extra weight is of little matter with a motor but it means all these R+M bikes should have 203 Ice tech rotors as standard equipment. The rack plate replacement is steel now so I am good with that retro fix. I am with you Mr Coffee. As for battery style , the powertube looks sleek but my wife has a Trek that uses the same powerpack batteries as my R+M and I like the fact that I can access all 4 batteries on either bike.
 
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Smultron

New Member
Long time to take out, why take them out at all? Just use the charing port on the bike..
Remove them for transportation on a bike rack.
For charging in the office or during a break (might be difficult to take a bike inside a restaurant)
If you commute it might be a good idea to take them inside if it is freezing or really hot.