Single Speed ?

#3
There are tons of people and that commute on single speed bikes. A great example of that is here in New York City where a vast amount of commuters and messengers are fans of their simplistic single speed/ fixed gear bikes. It makes sense to want one less part (derailleurs and shifters) on your bike to maintain. Even though I've been surrounded by ebikes for the last three years working at Propel Bikes, I still enjoy riding my single speed bike after work and cruising the neighborhood.
The Copenhagen wheel is a cool option for folks that still want to maintain the simplicity of their bike, but with a bit of extra boost. It's a neat package considering if you already have a single speed bike you really love, like a nice Cinelli or Linus, and want to upgrade your commute. I would however like to see more color options, something more stealthy to so it's not as flashy when locking up on the streets of NYC. A neat feature I do like is the regenerative braking when you pedal backwards, which in most other retrofitting cases, requires you to run a brake sensor cable to your brake levers. The Copenhagen wheel takes away the hassle of cables and zipties and leaves that simplistic look it's supposed to have. I hope as ebike technology progresses, the price point will also come down.
 
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Dewey

Active Member
#4
Single speed ebikes like the E-Glide SS, Populo Sport, Sondors Thin, and EasyGo Race are some of the lightest weight affordable complete ebikes. Court has mentioned some can be geared high so you don't spin out and for that reason he likes a throttle or more sensitive PAS sensor so the motor can help you get moving from stationary or up hill.
 
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Thomas Jaszewski

Well-Known Member
#9
Well , I think there are two separate levels of Schwinn .
One for department stores like Walmart , and one for independent bicycle shops .
Their hasn't been a quality level Schwinn built since the mid 70's. I owned them 60 years ago and recently checked out and purchased a couple for eBike builds. Not worth the time or money. It's only a name these days, not synonymous with any level of quality. But then I don't find bike in this price range, unless owner built kits to be worth the cost.
 
#10
Their hasn't been a quality level Schwinn built since the mid 70's.
I basically agree with @Thomas Jaszewski, but I would amend that to the 1980's. After all, the 1980's was when the Waterford, Wisconsin, factory was producing Schwinn Paramounts, one of the best bicycles ever made. After Schwinn went bankrupt in 1992, a succession of lesser companies have owned the name, and none have produced great bicycles. Indeed, the true successor to Schwinn, quality-wise, would be Waterford Precision Bicycles, co-founded by Richard Schwinn, great-grandson of Ignaz Schwinn. But Waterford does not make ebikes.

I still own a Schwinn Paramount that was converted (prior to my ownership) to single-speed. It is a great ride. And yes, a single-speed ebike is not a bad idea.
 

Thomas Jaszewski

Well-Known Member
#11
I basically agree with @Thomas Jaszewski, but I would amend that to the 1980's. After all, the 1980's was when the Waterford, Wisconsin, factory was producing Schwinn Paramounts, one of the best bicycles ever made. After Schwinn went bankrupt in 1992, a succession of lesser companies have owned the name, and none have produced great bicycles. Indeed, the true successor to Schwinn, quality-wise, would be Waterford Precision Bicycles, co-founded by Richard Schwinn, great-grandson of Ignaz Schwinn. But Waterford does not make ebikes.

I still own a Schwinn Paramount that was converted (prior to my ownership) to single-speed. It is a great ride. And yes, a single-speed ebike is not a bad idea.
I owned 2 Paramounts in the early 70’s an recently researched a friends mid 70’s frame. Made in the last schwinn factory in that era. I’d like to see any links showing any American made frame after that. It’s all Chinese. Not that thats bad. Its all in how the manufacture is monitored and controlled. China can build the best and worst. Schwinn name isused by low quality builders. There are no more Compagnola Schwinns. Niceto read someone liked them as much as me!
 
#12
I owned 2 Paramounts in the early 70’s an recently researched a friends mid 70’s frame. Made in the last schwinn factory in that era. I’d like to see any links showing any American made frame after that. It’s all Chinese. Not that thats bad. Its all in how the manufacture is monitored and controlled. China can build the best and worst. Schwinn name isused by low quality builders. There are no more Compagnola Schwinns. Niceto read someone liked them as much as me!
As I said, the Schwinn Waterford, Wisconsin, plant produced Paramounts in the 1980's. Here's a quote from Wikipedia's entry (emphasis mine):

"In 1993, Richard Schwinn, great-grandson of Ignaz Schwinn, with business partner Marc Muller, purchased the Schwinn Paramount plant in Waterford, Wisconsin, where Paramounts were built since 1980. They founded Waterford Precision Cycles, which is still in operation. In 2003 they employed 18 workers building lightweight bicycles.[59]"

The Waterford Precision Bicycles site also has several sections devoted to the history of the Schwinn Paramount. Of relevant interest would be this one, which details, down to wonkish frame details, how Paramounts where made in the Waterford factory throughout the 1980's.
 
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#13
Also, I just checked the serial number of my Schwinn Paramount:
495A WK 87130.

It says my bike was made in the Waterford factory in October 1987.

The first three numbers are the frame size, 49.5 cm. The letter "A" indicates it is a road frame.

The "W" indicates it was made in the Waterford factory.

The "K" is the month, October ("I" was not used).

"87" is the year, 1987.

"130" means it was the 130th frame scheduled during the month.
 
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Thomas Jaszewski

Well-Known Member
#14
My apologies, my old brain lost track of the dates. It was the southern factory in the late 80's, and early 90's I was thinking about. Regardless, the bikes are Walmart quality and despite the claim of a premium version, I find them to be a great disappointment over the bikes I rode from 1959-1973. 1973 Sports Tourer and Paramount were my last Schwinns. However the same shop still exists, I've seen them all, and I remain disappointed. Not the quality of eBike that interests me. The scooters were accidents waiting to happen IME.
 

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