Softening the ride without breaking the bank

#1
A lot of folks here have commented on the stiffness of the Stromers without any suspension. The carbon fork on my ST2 allegedly helps absorb vibrations better than aluminum, but that's not saying a whole lot. Even though I got a spectacular deal on my ST2 (Thank you Crazy Lenny's!!) I spent more than I had planned. After I bought the necessary little things like extra inner tubes and tire liners, chain lube, a better headlight, panniers and locks, I was out of money.

Lots of folks here have Thudbusters or Bodyfloat seat posts which are quite pricey. Even the less expensive Suntour version isn't cheap. Then I found the Satori Animaris parallel- linkage post on Amazon:https://www.amazon.com/Satori-Anima...id=1533567644&sr=8-1&keywords=satori+animaris

It's gone up a bit in price since I got it, but for the money I don't think you'd find something that works nearly as well. Even large irregularities in the road are smoothed out.

I didn't want and couldn't afford to buy the front suspension kit offered by Stromer dealers. But my hands have been numb since the day I got the bike. Gloves help a bit, but I really wanted a Sta-Fast suspension stem. But they cost a lot. I tried a less expensive RedMotion Shockstop stem, and that was good for minor road chatter. It would probably be fine if it were my only option, But then I stumbled on these suspension handlebars from Baramind (a French company): https://www.baramind-bike.com/bam-trek

They make three different versions: a City version with quite a bit of rise and back sweep, an MTB version with adjustable amounts of deflection which are flat bars, and a Trek version which is halfway between the first two. I got on the mailing list and ordered it last week when they began to ship. It took only 5 days from Paris to Vermont which was impressive, but not nearly so impressive as the handlebars themselves. They are amazing. At $100 they're not exactly cheap, but they're still cheaper than the available suspension stems, and the design makes more sense to me and from my experience, they work better.

For $150 I went from numbness in some very vital body parts to feeling like I'm riding on deflated fat tires, but the handling hasn't changed. If anything, being more comfortable improves how the bike handles.

Stay comfy and wear your helmets-
 

Trail Cruiser

Well-Known Member
#2
A lot of folks here have commented on the stiffness of the Stromers without any suspension. The carbon fork on my ST2 allegedly helps absorb vibrations better than aluminum, but that's not saying a whole lot. Even though I got a spectacular deal on my ST2 (Thank you Crazy Lenny's!!) I spent more than I had planned. After I bought the necessary little things like extra inner tubes and tire liners, chain lube, a better headlight, panniers and locks, I was out of money.

Lots of folks here have Thudbusters or Bodyfloat seat posts which are quite pricey. Even the less expensive Suntour version isn't cheap. Then I found the Satori Animaris parallel- linkage post on Amazon:https://www.amazon.com/Satori-Anima...id=1533567644&sr=8-1&keywords=satori+animaris

It's gone up a bit in price since I got it, but for the money I don't think you'd find something that works nearly as well. Even large irregularities in the road are smoothed out.

I didn't want and couldn't afford to buy the front suspension kit offered by Stromer dealers. But my hands have been numb since the day I got the bike. Gloves help a bit, but I really wanted a Sta-Fast suspension stem. But they cost a lot. I tried a less expensive RedMotion Shockstop stem, and that was good for minor road chatter. It would probably be fine if it were my only option, But then I stumbled on these suspension handlebars from Baramind (a French company): https://www.baramind-bike.com/bam-trek

They make three different versions: a City version with quite a bit of rise and back sweep, an MTB version with adjustable amounts of deflection which are flat bars, and a Trek version which is halfway between the first two. I got on the mailing list and ordered it last week when they began to ship. It took only 5 days from Paris to Vermont which was impressive, but not nearly so impressive as the handlebars themselves. They are amazing. At $100 they're not exactly cheap, but they're still cheaper than the available suspension stems, and the design makes more sense to me and from my experience, they work better.

For $150 I went from numbness in some very vital body parts to feeling like I'm riding on deflated fat tires, but the handling hasn't changed. If anything, being more comfortable improves how the bike handles.

Stay comfy and wear your helmets-
Shifting your weight/load from upper body to the seat helps a lot in riding comfort, especially in relieving hand numbness.
There are many options out there. These are the steps I did:
1. Shorter stem

short stem.jpg

2. Stem riser

riser.jpg

3. Swept handle bar

jones.jpg
 
#3
Well said about all the extra expenses to customize the bike.

For me, the numb/tingly hands were from leaning over to my handlebars. The more I raised my handlebars so that I rode in an upright sitting position or cruiser style, the hand numbness vanished.

The drawback to just finding a tall stem is that all the cables and wires for brakes, gauges and 5 other things will need to be replaced if you are to truly get the handlebars high enough to stop the after ride hand discomfort.
 

opimax

Well-Known Member
#5
Good gloves and adjusting the seat height and angle helped my numbness. Since then I have added front suspension, switch between Body Float or Thudbuster (have both), new gel seat . I would be interested to test a Brooks saddle but have not taken the plunge yet. I have put on st2s size tires on my st2 which are thinner. I ride at near max pressure . I am on paved surface over 90% of the time.

all of this is the oposite of breaking the bank, I have quit spending on other toys since this is what do when i can. No more sports cars , now a van to carry the bikes, no more aftermarket car stereo and sold all the spares, home stereo is good enough i guess too (it is but i could always use some good new interconnects) but i am not home listening to music i am out listening to cheap earbuds (maybe break down and call this part of biking and splurge)
 
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opimax

Well-Known Member
#7
Thx, I am on the current belief that this more miles per battery, I try not to use the lights on the built in battery also. Until someone tells me how many specific feet or miles I am using with lights and lower pressure I am going to save every foot possible. A little OCD goes a long way :)
 
#8
Wonder how they came across that catchy name”SATORI ANIMARIS”?
I bought a rear trunk bag on ebay made by a company called "Cool Change". I have no idea why they put so little effort (or so much effort?) into naming things stupid names.

Also- an update on the Baramind BAM Trek handlebars: They are worth every penny. I've been riding with them for almost a week now and can report with confidence that they do what they claim to do. I don't feel them flex, but I do notice that roads and paths simply seem much smoother. The numbness in my hands is gone completely. The tension in my upper back, shoulders, and neck after a long ride is gone. They make for a far more relaxing ride and I feel like I can ride harder, faster and farther without feeling as though I've worked harder. Hell, if it were only placebo I'd still be happy that I feel better, but I really didn't expect such a difference. Here is a video of them in action. Note: the slo-mo video makes them look almost flimsy, which is not at all how they feel.


I am not affiliated with the company in any way and have nothing to gain by posting this. I just know that I appreciate it when someone alerts me to something new that really works. These things really work.
 
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Rincon

Active Member
#9
Thx, I am on the current belief that this more miles per battery...
There was a study that showed that there was no calorie/mileage difference between max pressure tires and lower pressure tires. (I did not save a link to the study.) The reason is that while low pressure tires do have more rolling resistance, high pressure tires transmit more road shock through the frame and the rider which reduces efficiency—road shock being an equal and opposite reaction to forward movement. The efficiency reduction of low pressure rolling resistance was about the same as that produced by a harsh, high tire pressure ride. In other words, there was no gain in efficiency by running high pressure tires.
 

opimax

Well-Known Member
#11
Rincon, since I have a front suspension, thudbuster/body float, I wonder if/how that is offset??? How does one feel rolling resistance vs road shock while riding? also at what point does the law of diminishing return come to play?

on a side note i had 1 pinch flat since riding ebikes and that was at lower pressrue , where does puncture resisrtance come into tire pressure?
 

Rincon

Active Member
#12
Rincon, since I have a front suspension, thudbuster/body float, I wonder if/how that is offset??? How does one feel rolling resistance vs road shock while riding? also at what point does the law of diminishing return come to play?

on a side note i had 1 pinch flat since riding ebikes and that was at lower pressrue , where does puncture resisrtance come into tire pressure?
Great questions. The study didn’t account for suspension. Suspension counteracts road shock. That’s what it is supposed to do. So by adding weight in the form of suspension forks, you can ride firmer tires faster and more efficiently. But increased weight is itself less efficient. There is no free lunch, but it would greatly depend on your roads—the more bumps, the more shocks will pay off. I think if you are going to use suspension, then you might as well optimize by hiking pressure to the max.

The study didn’t address puncture resistance at all. It was strictly concerned with the efficiency of skinny-tired road bike tire pressure. It only tested for a single variable, like all good studies. I thought it was interesting. The unsprung trade off between low pressure rolling resistance and high pressure road shock were nearly identical.
 
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Alaskan

Well-Known Member
#13
Good gloves and adjusting the seat height and angle helped my numbness. Since then I have added front suspension, switch between Body Float or Thudbuster (have both), new gel seat . I would be interested to test a Brooks saddle but have not taken the plunge yet. I have put on st2s size tires on my st2 which are thinner. I ride at near max pressure . I am on paved surface over 90% of the time.

all of this is the oposite of breaking the bank, I have quit spending on other toys since this is what do when i can. No more sports cars , now a van to carry the bikes, no more aftermarket car stereo and sold all the spares, home stereo is good enough i guess too (it is but i could always use some good new interconnects) but i am not home listening to music i am out listening to cheap earbuds (maybe break down and call this part of biking and splurge)
I love listening to good tunes sometimes when I ride. However ear buds are to much of an impairment to situational awareness, something I do believe can prolong my life. I use this little bluetooth speaker/radio/horn/ hands free phone unit. Damn near the best $40 I have spent on my bike. I can listen and still hear what is going on around me.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Bike-Premi...var=423485324339&_trksid=p2060353.m1438.l2649

 

opimax

Well-Known Member
#14
I hope I am safe rider . My goal is never to do anything that causes you to react. I am not perfect just close. I could not do this if I could not hear what is going on around me. In my case I have some kind of listen device in my ear. I find the difference here is the volume control. As a 62 year old child I do have and use ability to keep sound at level which allows me to hear outside of the earphones.

I do try to make myself as noticeable as possible with excessive lights and at least an extra bell ring when passing. Most I pass may be slightly annoyed at me but the point is they know I am there and there for no physical contact does us both good. That being said I don’t want to hear everybody’s radio, excessive noise to me but does add a little more safety I would think.

Ps born in Fairbanks, sister lives there.
 

opimax

Well-Known Member
#15
So how to set up a bike (mine in particular) for most mileage? Even with the front lock out there is some give,I leave it set there. The seat post can be set to little or a lot of preload I am soft but some and tires near max th effrontery 5 less than the rear, what other suggestions or modifications to get more feet per battery?
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
#17
Shy of adding a suspension fork, a Redshift ShockStop Suspension Stem takes quite a bit of impact out of the handlebars https://redshiftsports.com/shockstop-suspension-stem

A Kinect Body Float Seat Suspension will help keep the tush happier https://cirruscycles.com/

There are several saddles that will help as well. The Ergon St Core Prime is one of the best http://www.ergon-bike.com/en/article-st-core-prime.html

Ther Ergon Grips also help spread the road shock over a larger area of the hand.
 

bluecat

Well-Known Member
#18
The former Stromer CEO Christian Müller is since a few years CSO at Biketec, the biggest eBike manufacturer in Switzerland. Their brand "Flyer" was in earlier years a little competitive to Stromer. Meanwhile, they changed the model range. At the top is the Uproc 7 with full suspension and the M99pro:

1533847636721.png


So please excuse my sense of humor, but this bike offers a very smooth ride up to 25km/h. And for sure, your dealer will add a racks and a trailer hook.

Okay, there will be no Flyer dealers in the US. Back to the ST2...